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!becca
04-30-2008, 11:29 AM
How do you store and dispose of your paint, medium, and turpentine soaked clean-up rags? I have been simply collecting them from my work area, putting them into small plastic bags and placing them in the garage until the trash goes out weekly. That has not worked so well for me. Yesterday morning they caught fire. By the time I realized it there was a 10 ft square fire blazing in my garage fueled by plastic containers and some cat cushions an a retired exercise bike. Fortunately I thought of my garden hose in time and put it out, it was very frighting and very dirty. Smoke was so thick I couldn't see the lit light bulb over my head. My blond hair was black with smoke. Fortunately there was no structural damage. I do not want to repeat this ordeal so please help me find a better way to handle these materials.

obxladybear
04-30-2008, 11:45 AM
I hadn't really thought of the rags catching on fire before, but I don't use much flamable..(acrylic and water soluable paints is what I favor)...but I suppose you could get one of those aluminum garbage cans with the lids from a hardware store (I have some I use for bird seed) and still store the rags in the garage, but being in the can and closed with the lid, should be pretty safe...:)

bairam
04-30-2008, 12:10 PM
I have a bucket with water in it. I drop the paint rags in there. The one I'm using I make sure to let it dry hanging on a nail between sessions.

Lap3
04-30-2008, 01:11 PM
Wow, that is really scary. I have heard that could happen but really haven't been all that careful. I also have heard that you should keep them in a metal trash can with lid so that the oxygen is not there for ignition. I guess I will be going out to get me one as well. I am glad that you posted this it may save several of us.

Cheryl

doodledee
04-30-2008, 01:48 PM
Yep, I use a metal trash can w/lid.

Bizkit
04-30-2008, 08:27 PM
(your suppose to dispose of them?)...just kidding!!!!
I usually just toss them out with the trash, trash goes a couple times a week so its not really a problem.

Naturegyrll
04-30-2008, 08:53 PM
Here is the link for the Material Safety Sheet for Turps: http://www.dick-blick.com/msds/DBH_00442.pdf


This says to place the rags in AIR TIGHT METAL containers before you dispose of them.

Gamsol OMS: http://www.dick-blick.com/msds/DBH_00456a.pdf

Says to immerse the rags into water but small amounts can be tossed in the trash.

Other folks have suggested to put them out in the open in order to dry out before you toss them out. A collection of vapors is the real problem and when it gets hot outside, the flash point becomes more of an issue.

I have wondered how real the threat is but your experience is stunning and a good lesson for us all.

!becca
04-30-2008, 09:47 PM
Thank you, everyone for responding. I guess that it is a metal container from now on, probably with water. I was skeptical about the real danger of fire myself. Maybe it is a mix of turpentine, stand oil, and damar I have been using that in some way made a hotter mix. I don't know. Anyway, thanks again, and I hope that no one else has to learn this lesson the way that I did.

billmahler
04-30-2008, 10:51 PM
Becca
Sorry you had that episode and thank you for the heads up.
I've thought about it, but never heard of it happening.
I'll put mine in a sealed plastic bag till I can get a metal container, and that will be soon!

TallGuy
05-01-2008, 12:00 AM
Becca,

I have been concerned with this issue in the past too.

Some other threads on the issue

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185896
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=162224

These days I use paper towels for rags and cleanup. When finished I put them into a plastic bag with enough water to soak them before disposal.

Jason.

!becca
05-01-2008, 12:38 AM
Thank you, Bill, and don't forget the water.
Thanks, Jason, the threads were very helpful.

janeTuesday
05-01-2008, 01:08 AM
Glad to hear YOU were/are ok Becca, even if your blonde locks ended up sooty :eek:.

I only started painting in oils about 6 months ago and I would have never thought about the saftey issues involved. I don't use rags, instead paper towel and I always throw them in the kicthen bin. They never get soaked as I generally wipe paint off brushes onto them, clean the brushes in turps and then squeeze them dry with more paper towel. I take my old turps outside and pour it all over weeds in garden. Is this wrong??? I have concerns now :eek:.

!becca
05-01-2008, 02:06 AM
Thank you, Jane. I use paper towel too, and your procedure is a lot like mine. A little caution can't hurt.

dirtysteev
05-01-2008, 03:12 AM
scary stuff becca, glad it wasnt out of control. incidentally, water is very often the worst agent you can hit a chemical (ie petroleum distillates) fire with. keep an extinguisher in the studio. (hopefully everyone is taking a minute to review materials handling of ALL of the chemical compounds that enter their studios. in my field as a carpenter i have seen two spontaneous combustion events, both were straight linseed oil on cottton rags. one was actually in a metal trash can with a lid on it. i have since kept a five gallon bucket half full of water in the studio. all spent rags get completely submerged. when it becomes full i take it to the local dump and they kindly dispose it as haz-mat for me. totally safe.
jane tuesday, i question your pouriong turps into the ground for several reasons. i certainly hope you arent eating out of your garden!
cheers, be safe everyone. steve

janeTuesday
05-01-2008, 04:24 AM
dirtysteev - no way! I wouldn't pour it anywhere near my vege patch :eek:. I pour it on the weeds that take over the lawn at the front of our property. Where does everyone else pour their turps?

soap
05-01-2008, 04:32 AM
Oh My! How scary that must have been!!
I only use kitchen paper toweling and I throw them in the (plastic) outside bin every day. The bin gets emptied by the binman once a week.
Is this unsafe?? I imagine it might be in the summer when the plastic bin can get quite warm.
so am I suppose to keep them in a fireproof container till the binman can take it? My! My pastels are beckoning again....less hassle.

Really sorry to hear this Becca. Glad you are ok.

Jane, I really thought you were joking! We should really all throw our turps away at the chemical waste disposal point somewhere in our town. Its the worst for the environment and when we throw it down the drain, or pour it in the garden, we are helping to ruin our soil, groundwater, rain etc etc. I feel guilty doing it (I poor it down the drain) but I use probably a teaspoon per month of the stuff so I tell myself I am not so bad. But you cannot pour it outside! It will not only kill your weeds but anything else you might wanna grow there one day. Not to mention the groundwater, wildlife etc.
Sorry, enough preaching...didn't mean to lecture....:o

janeTuesday
05-01-2008, 05:52 AM
My goodness, I never knew (or even thought) about if I was harming the environment :eek:. I just loved the way the weeds were dead in about 10 minutes. Out the front will never be anything but grass but I shall stop doing it as of the next pour! We have our own sewers where we live so no chemical is allowed down our drain, but I shall now tip it all into a larger container and take it down to local tip :).

Soap, how on earth do you use such a little amount of turps though :confused:. I use about 100mls daily.

gee, what have you started here Becca :p

soap
05-01-2008, 06:18 AM
well, OK maybe two teaspoons a month....:D
But I clean my brushes with water and dishwashing liquid and I only use a tiny amount of white spirit for underpainting. I hardly use any medium but in the last layers of painting I often use a bit of linseed oil (which is flammable!)

!becca
05-01-2008, 11:05 AM
Thank you for the wonderful comments and suggestions Steve and Sophie. I will be changing my habits; cleaning more with soap and submersing rags in water. I will need to buy some spare brushes, but that is cheap in comparison to what happened. Also will purchase that fire extinguisher. Jane, I have set the bit of old turp that I need to dispose of outside to evaporate.

Naturegyrll
05-01-2008, 12:00 PM
I have never had the need to dispose of turps. I let it settle, pour off the clear stuff on top to a new container. Then I wipe out the residue with a paper towel. Let it dry (evaporate) and then I toss it in the trash. It's easy and kinder to the environment.

janeTuesday
05-01-2008, 05:47 PM
Naturegyrll - that is a great idea. I think I will adopt that one. OK, so no more turps on those horrible weeds :D. And I too will buy a metal bin for my paper towel (needed a bin in studio anyway).

stoney
05-02-2008, 12:08 AM
How do you store and dispose of your paint, medium, and turpentine soaked clean-up rags? I have been simply collecting them from my work area, putting them into small plastic bags and placing them in the garage until the trash goes out weekly. That has not worked so well for me. Yesterday morning they caught fire. By the time I realized it there was a 10 ft square fire blazing in my garage fueled by plastic containers and some cat cushions an a retired exercise bike. Fortunately I thought of my garden hose in time and put it out, it was very frighting and very dirty. Smoke was so thick I couldn't see the lit light bulb over my head. My blond hair was black with smoke. Fortunately there was no structural damage. I do not want to repeat this ordeal so please help me find a better way to handle these materials.

Put them in a sealed metal container which has a grounding strap attached (nut/bolt/washer/lockwasher and braided cable preferably; although a 12 Ga., (minimum) copper wire will do. A difference in potential due to atmospheric conditions is enough to cause combustion.

A racked Class B fire extinguisher should be kept near by.

stoney
05-02-2008, 12:14 AM
Here is the link for the Material Safety Sheet for Turps: http://www.dick-blick.com/msds/DBH_00442.pdf


This says to place the rags in AIR TIGHT METAL containers before you dispose of them.

Gamsol OMS: http://www.dick-blick.com/msds/DBH_00456a.pdf

Says to immerse the rags into water but small amounts can be tossed in the trash.

Other folks have suggested to put them out in the open in order to dry out before you toss them out. A collection of vapors is the real problem and when it gets hot outside, the flash point becomes more of an issue.

I have wondered how real the threat is but your experience is stunning and a good lesson for us all.

The threat is very very real. Take a look at how the military handles things like that-including spray cans of paint. Hard experience. The military keeps spray cans of paint in a vented metal locker which has a ground strap.

The most dangerous class of fire is Class D. A metal fire (steel wool anyone?) creates its own oxygen.

Emergency fire starting tip. Steel wool and the two class D batteries from a flashlight. Put the two flashlight batteries series aiding [- to +] then stretch the steel wool to touch the outer poles. Ignition results.

stoney
05-02-2008, 12:16 AM
Thank you, everyone for responding. I guess that it is a metal container from now on, probably with water. I was skeptical about the real danger of fire myself. Maybe it is a mix of turpentine, stand oil, and damar I have been using that in some way made a hotter mix. I don't know. Anyway, thanks again, and I hope that no one else has to learn this lesson the way that I did.

Spontaneous combustion does happen.

stoney
05-02-2008, 12:58 AM
Glad to hear YOU were/are ok Becca, even if your blonde locks ended up sooty :eek:.

I only started painting in oils about 6 months ago and I would have never thought about the saftey issues involved. I don't use rags, instead paper towel and I always throw them in the kicthen bin. They never get soaked as I generally wipe paint off brushes onto them, clean the brushes in turps and then squeeze them dry with more paper towel. I take my old turps outside and pour it all over weeds in garden. Is this wrong??? I have concerns now :eek:.

http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthguidelines/turpentine/index.html

http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthguidelines/turpentine/recognition.html#storage

STORAGE

Turpentine should be stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area in tightly sealed containers that are labeled in accordance with OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard [29 CFR 1910.1200]. Turpentine can undergo autoxidation in contact with air and can generate heat that may spontaneously ignite in a confined space. Containers of turpentine should be protected from physical damage and should be stored separately from strong oxidizers (especially chlorine), heat, sparks, and open flame. Only nonsparking tools may be used to handle turpentine. To prevent static sparks, containers should be grounded and bonded for transfers. Because containers that formerly contained turpentine may still hold product residues, they should be handled appropriately. [/excerpt]

http://www.illawarrasurf.com/msds/turps.pdf

stoney
05-02-2008, 01:02 AM
dirtysteev - no way! I wouldn't pour it anywhere near my vege patch :eek:. I pour it on the weeds that take over the lawn at the front of our property. Where does everyone else pour their turps?

I've never used turps and have no need for it.

stoney
05-02-2008, 01:03 AM
Naturegyrll - that is a great idea. I think I will adopt that one. OK, so no more turps on those horrible weeds :D. And I too will buy a metal bin for my paper towel (needed a bin in studio anyway).

Don't store the bin in your studio when you aren't immediately needing it.

!becca
05-02-2008, 01:41 AM
Thank you, Stoney.

stoney
05-02-2008, 01:42 AM
Thank you, Stoney.

You're more than welcome, gracious lady. :)

idcrisis55
10-12-2008, 11:15 AM
This is an older thread but I do have a question. I live in the country and am wondering if it would be considered safe to burn small amounts of paper towels soaked in solvents, mediums and paint? We do not have a local hazardous waste disposal or even a land fill. My concern is spontaneous combustion of the towels. Currently, I place the towels in a trash can and pour water over them. Any thoughts or concerns would be appreciated. Thanks

AlbertSc
10-12-2008, 11:52 AM
Geez, I always wanted to use H. Rap Brown's famous line: "Burn, baby, burn!"

You should have no problems burning oily or solvent soaked paper towels IF YOUR COUNTY PERMITS IT. Where I am, open burning is prohibited; the next county over, however, lets you burn almost anything in the open. Remember the smells of leaves burning in autumn? Alas, a vanishing delight.

You local hardware emporium may sell burn barrels -- nothing more than 30-gallon galvanized cans with a series of vent holes let in near the bottom for draft. While there, get hold of some hardware cloth from which to fashion a screen to retain the hot ash (which wants to fly off and burn your neighbors out -- a liability or benefit wholly dependent upon the neighbors :rolleyes: ).

I keep an open box next to my easel, and I chuck paper towels into it as I use them. Don't wad them tightly. Most dry quickly if the burden is a solvent; linseed takes a bit longer, but by the end of a session of a few hours ordinary boiled oil is stiffening up. If you are really very messy and generate a copious amount of refuse, you might want to keep an open, metal can just outside the house, emptying it often into your burn barrel. Burn small lots often, rather than major conflagrations that will earn you a place in your neighbors eyes, if not in their hearts.

Check your county about the law. And, always check local fire conditions before tossing that match.

!becca
10-12-2008, 11:54 AM
I have adopted the practice of placing my rags in water with a little detergent now, and fortunately we do have a landfill. All waste at the landfill here is burned, so I don't see why you shouldn't burn your own. I am certain that environmentally there are better solutions, but given your options, I would burn them.

idcrisis55
10-12-2008, 12:57 PM
Albert and Becca, thank you both for your information. Burning is allowed in our county unless we are under a fire or wind watch. The smoke is noxious and would hate to disturb the neighbors (or myself) with it so was thinking of burning very small amounts at a time.

Becca, I read about the spontaneous combustion happening in your garage and that has made me even more cautious. Is there a reason you add detergent to the water?

AlbertSc
10-12-2008, 02:39 PM
I shall not presume to speak for Becca, but the addition of a small amount of dishwashing detergent would assure rapid wetting of the towels despite the solvent or oil on them.

idcrisis55
10-12-2008, 04:09 PM
Thank you Albert. I wasn't sure of the reasoning behind adding a dishwashing detergent and you answered that. :)

!becca
10-12-2008, 04:19 PM
Thanks, Albert.

Snowbound
10-12-2008, 05:03 PM
It is illegal to dispose of these materials by pouring them on the ground, for good reasons. It may not seem like much, but cumulatively these chemicals contaminate the air, soil, and both surface and ground water-- they don't stay in one place. A "little here" and a "little there" add up to nonpoint pollution, the most difficult kind to control and correct.

I wouldn't recommend using plastic even as a temporary storage-- the plastic can become part of the problem. Several people have suggested good-- and legal-- methods of disposal. Please use them, for your sake and for everyone's!

Dayle Ann (water and soil quality specialist in a former life)

LifeOfArt
10-12-2008, 05:20 PM
I am thinking about trying out oil paints. And thought I would check out this site. It is a good thing I did. I never acurred to me that all the salvents that you use. Would catch fire. I know that turp is flamable. And I planned to be very careful using it. But I had bought some rags for wiping and cleaning my brushes. Now I think I will now buy a bucket to put soapy water in, before I ever start with the oil paints.

Is it the paints that catch fire to? What about the ones you can use water with? :confused:

!becca
10-12-2008, 05:37 PM
I doubt that the water based paints are a problem, and oil paints in the tube are not likely to combust even though they have some oils. It is the turps and mediums.

stoney
10-12-2008, 09:30 PM
This is an older thread but I do have a question. I live in the country and am wondering if it would be considered safe to burn small amounts of paper towels soaked in solvents, mediums and paint? We do not have a local hazardous waste disposal or even a land fill. My concern is spontaneous combustion of the towels. Currently, I place the towels in a trash can and pour water over them. Any thoughts or concerns would be appreciated. Thanks

I'd suggest waiting for any burn season to open then burn them in a metal container which would contain the ash. Once cold-place the ashes in a smaller secure lidded container. The key is not to contaminate the ground. Such is very expensive to clean up-especially anything petroleum based.

You might contact the local rural fire department or the fire department in a city when you are there.

stoney
10-12-2008, 09:33 PM
I doubt that the water based paints are a problem, and oil paints in the tube are not likely to combust even though they have some oils. It is the turps and mediums.

The soiled paper toweling or rags even more so.

stoney
10-12-2008, 11:00 PM
I doubt that the water based paints are a problem, and oil paints in the tube are not likely to combust even though they have some oils. It is the turps and mediums.

The soiled paper toweling or rags even more so.

Keep in mind the danger increases when humidity is low. Keep the stuff in a lidded metal container which *has* a ground strap. Static electricity is sufficient to touch it off. With a ground strap the *maximum* resistance reading from the metal case or bolt to a known good [Zero Ohm reading] is 1 Ohm. If it is more, the slight touch of sand paper will take care of that.

If you're going to fuel your car; touch the door metal before touching the fuel pump handle. If you go back into your car again, touch the door, roof, hood {bonnet} metal before touching the pump handle. You've explosive vapours right there. If there is a fire-do *not* pull the pump handle out-unless you want a flame thrower.

Danger of static discharge is also why one is supposed to put a gas can on the ground before filling.

Consider the shock you'll feel from time to time when you're getting out of your car. The *minimum* threshold for you to feel it is 50,000 volts. Such is a lightening strike. I'm sure you've seen pictures of holes blown in things from hefty lightening strikes.

Consider the circuit cards in computers and other devices which operate using, now, 1.5 volts. The light, to you, 50,000 volt shock-barely felt-is as that lightening strike to a circuit card. Such may or may not cause immediate failure, but it will contribute to failure down the line. Such is called ESD {Electro-static Discharge}.



This lady was very lucky. Looks like the auto shut-off when the nozzle is removed from the tank fill pipe saved her. There was just the residue to burn and the auto shut-off protected the petrol station main fuel tanks.

Electrostatic Discharge - Fueling up
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1dTSuwz0R8

Gas Pump Explosion Caused by Static Electricity
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tYO4jvnJHw&feature=related

A cell phone and static electricity
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gct1BmKNvU0&feature=related

PSA - static electricity blows up gas stations
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qpzw_mR8M-Q&feature=related

Guy set on fire filling up his car
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kK-lvtp7G0E&feature=related

Gasoline Refueling / Gas Pump - Safety Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAA5w8PLs-0&feature=related

idcrisis55
10-13-2008, 08:28 AM
Thank you all for your thoughts and suggestions on this topic. You have been most helpful.

karenlee
10-15-2008, 09:49 AM
In The Artist's Handbook , Ralph Mayer describes why linseed oil wiped on a rag is so combustible: the oil is a colloid, capable of spreading over a large area in a rag. When the oil is dispersed on a rag, the surface area of the oil increases astronomically. The heat of oxidation in a crumpled rag can build up enough to ignite the rag.
"A familiar example of the changes in properties caused by increase of surface is the well-known spontanteous combustion of rags, cotton waste, etc when such materials are soaked in drying oils. Normally the oxidation or drying of linseed oil by the absorption of oxygen from the air is a mild and slow reaction, and no change in temperature can be observed; but when the oil is spread over such a finely divided substance, and is exposed to the atmosphere over such a widely extended surface, the heat developed by the reaction is so greatly magnified that it may be sufficient to ignite the materials."
So not only turps rags, but also linseed oil soaked rags are to be reckoned with!

karenlee
10-15-2008, 09:57 AM
:thumbsup: I doubt that the water based paints are a problem, and oil paints in the tube are not likely to combust even though they have some oils. It is the turps and mediums.
Since water-miscible oils are made with linseed oil just like regular oil paints, the same caution should be used with wiping rags that are used for water-miscible oils. Oil paints in tubes are not exposed to air or spread out over a large surface, as in a rag, so they aren't undergoing rapid heat-producing oxidation.

Use Her Name
10-15-2008, 12:09 PM
Most painting books will say do not store your rags in a big box in the garage as they will self-ignite. Glad you saved the garage.

The way I deal with the problem is to rarely use turpentine. I clean my brushes with oil (vegetable oil) and after with dish washing detergent, or "The Masters" brush cleaner if I have any.

I have a can of turpentine (galkyd) but I rarely use any. I also have a very small bottle of brush cleaner, for "forgotten" brushes that have hard paint on them. I get rid of the turps by putting the used portion in a jar with a lid and bringing it to the recycling center-- they take dangerous chemicals there.

SheGeek
08-08-2012, 07:37 PM
I have been searching for a thread that may have an answer to my question and this one was the closest to it that I could find. When I clear my pallet for the night I put my unused oil paints in foil and then into the freezer. The next time I paint I scrape them and put them back onto my pallet.
How should I dispose of the foil? I rinsed it, and crumpled it up, but too nervous to put it in my wastebin - I left it in my sink all night. Any suggestions?

!becca
08-08-2012, 07:44 PM
Ang, because the foil isn't combustible you likely would be ok...but what about a separate container that is fire proof for toxic waste? I don't know if you are using toxic products or not, but thought I would suggest it.

SheGeek
08-08-2012, 07:56 PM
Thanks for your reply.

I use walnut oil, baby oil and dawn.

I was just concerned that the foil might get hot and start a fire. I will keep the foil and dried paper towels in an old coffee can. I would just rather be safe than sorry.

!becca
08-08-2012, 08:04 PM
Ang. Sorry isn't a good place to be. You are lik ely safe with those products. But glad you are being cautious

DustyBrushes
08-08-2012, 08:27 PM
I've said this before and I'll say it again...treat your rags as if they are already on fire. Throw them in a bucket of water or sink of water or whatever. Just soak them.

Sarah Edgecumbe
08-11-2012, 07:35 PM
Ok - Quick question.

I have until now been using liquin ( don't shoot me i am new to oils..) because i was given some. I don't much like it. I am a lazy brush cleaner and i am going through too many brushes with the liquin.

I don't like using turps at all. I hate the smell and am trying to eliminate it from most of my painting.

I AM however loving using a little bit of linseed oil in my work. I got some to varnish my easel and used it on a painting and loved it.

I only use very very small amounts. perhaps a teespoon waste per painting session if i am lucky, perhaps less. i wipe onto a rag next to the easel.

Q: How long does it take for this NOT to be flammable? If it is dry is it safe?? or will it continue to be a problem after it is dry.

After it has been soaked in water will it still be flammable when i take it out?

ALSO: If i dip my brushes in the oil to clean them, and leave them with oil in them are the likely to combust? I normally dip them in the oil (instead of turps because i hate turps) and take them out to the laundry sink to soap and water them.

anyway, just trying to make my studio (attached to my brand new house) safer.

What a scary thing to happen.

Sarah

!becca
08-11-2012, 07:43 PM
Q: How long does it take for this NOT to be flammable? If it is dry is it safe?? or will it continue to be a problem after it is dry.

Sarah, after they are completely dry they should be safe...if you are soaking in water add a little soap..like Dawn, it will help leach the oils and solvents from your rags..but it will be a hazardous waste item after..

ALSO: If i dip my brushes in the oil to clean them, and leave them with oil in them are the likely to combust? I normally dip them in the oil (instead of turps because i hate turps) and take them out to the laundry sink to soap and water them.lol I have never heard of a brush combustion.:D could happen I suppose, but if they are in open air probably not and if you wash in soap it removes the oil...

I'm glad you are trying to be safe...you are right it is a scary thing to happen...maybe one of the scariest I have had...and that is saying something.

Sarah Edgecumbe
08-11-2012, 07:51 PM
Nods, very scary. Although, when i was small we had a similar incident with the Christmas cake. It turned into a 6 foot high inferno... (All i will say is Brandy is GREAT)

Thanks for the reply i will put them in a small metal tin with water until another option presents itself

!becca
08-11-2012, 08:05 PM
Sarah, it was hot enough to crack the windshield of my car and I was being very careful not to get it wet....a memory I will have till I am done I am sure..
And, I have seen those flaming deserts...amazing..a wonder more don't get away...brandy...amazing.:D

SSB
08-12-2012, 12:40 AM
I am storing any rags soiled with paint and have written a contract to have me stuffed with said rags upon my death, at which time I will be taken to the appropriate waste disposal and dumped with the rest of the toxic waste, which will be shuffled about until it ends up in the ocean...

I am just kidding!!!! That would be irresponsible. I actually chiffonade all my soiled rags and confit them in a gentle mixture of wild greens and herbs of the forest. Then they are rendered tender and noncombustible.

carolkay
08-12-2012, 01:22 AM
Scary Becca-

After each
Painting session, I take me rags outside to a metal trash covered can- place them in it.

Inside i keep a
Large trash bag, and when it becomes full, I place it in the trash to go out

BUT -- all the rags have had time to dry Nd the cans outside so even if a fire started it wouldn't get anywhere.

!becca
08-12-2012, 04:37 AM
I am storing any rags soiled with paint and have written a contract to have me stuffed with said rags upon my death, at which time I will be taken to the appropriate waste disposal and dumped with the rest of the toxic waste, which will be shuffled about until it ends up in the ocean...

I am just kidding!!!! That would be irresponsible. I actually chiffonade all my soiled rags and confit them in a gentle mixture of wild greens and herbs of the forest. Then they are rendered tender and noncombustible.:lol: :lol: :lol:

!becca
08-12-2012, 04:38 AM
Hi, Carol, outside is a much better place, and as I understand dry rags are safe,

karenlee
08-12-2012, 10:07 AM
Drying rags out is not the solution; it is the drying that is the problem: it is the very process of "drying"-- that is actually, oxidation of the oil in the rag-- that produces the heat that sets the rag afire. I think I posted this back on page 3.
I soak my used rags in water in a plastic bag and take them out to the metal garbage can after painting for the day is over.

!becca
08-12-2012, 10:13 AM
Thanks for that clarification, Karen, i realized the heat generated in drying caused the problem, but believed if they were allowed to dry in the open, the heat escapes and combustion can be avoided.,,I thought the risk was higher for crumpled rags in a confined place (as long as enough O2 is present)..I also thought once dry the risk no longer existed....I use water too, now.:)

tuzigoot
08-13-2012, 01:46 PM
After reading this thread I've started putting my used rags in a metal container like the ones gift popcorn comes in. Not exactly air tight. Today I took them out to the trash to be picked up today and noticed that they were all still quite damp.
So the question is: are the rags more likely to combust if they're still wet? Would I be better off laying them out, one by one, to dry and then putting them in the metal container? I do know that I can't put them in the trash in the garage, particularly this time of year when it gets unbelievably hot there, so my only option is to keep them elsewhere until it's trash day and then toss them.

!becca
08-13-2012, 01:52 PM
Linda, keep them in water if you can...either in the can or in bags as Karen said she does..at least thats what I would recommend at this point.

tuzigoot
08-13-2012, 02:09 PM
Was trying to avoid that as it will eventually rust the can. But I guess I can line it w a plastic bag. Thanks for the heads up, Becca!

!becca
08-13-2012, 02:15 PM
You're welcome, Linda..

DustyBrushes
08-14-2012, 04:39 PM
Linda, keep them in water if you can...either in the can or in bags as Karen said she does..at least thats what I would recommend at this point.

Treat them as if they are already on fire.

!becca
08-14-2012, 04:46 PM
Treat them as if they are already on fire.Nicy said..and I do add soap to my water for better wetting.

VicDiPilato
08-14-2012, 05:30 PM
As a celebration ritual for the completion of a painting, I light mine on fire!

Just kidding, I've never put much thought into the disposal, but it is something I need to do. I usually use three rags at a time. One for my face and hands. After it gets soiled, it gets promoted to my brushes. Once it's too dirty for my brushes it's left for cleaning up spills.

I'll buy a metal trash can

Tiptonite
08-14-2012, 08:04 PM
McMastercarr.com
They sell a metal container that has a pop up lid activated with a foot pedal and it was made specifically for this purpose. Please note this will only safely store the paint rags. safe disposal is another matter. For that I use a metal can, actually it's a minnow bait bucket, and barring any local burn bans
I burn the paint rags and when the ashes are cold they can safely be thrown out with the trash.

Tiptonite
08-14-2012, 08:06 PM
McMastercarr.com
They sell a metal container that has a pop up lid activated with a foot pedal and it was made specifically for this purpose. Please note this will only safely store the paint rags. safe disposal is another matter. For that I use a metal can, actually it's a minnow bait bucket, and barring any local burn bans...
I burn the paint rags and when the ashes are cold they can safely be thrown out with the trash.

Sarah Edgecumbe
08-15-2012, 03:12 AM
seriously after reading this thread, i went to art class. On the way home from art class, somehow my turps and linseed containers spilled in my art basket and went ALL OVER MY CAR SEAT..... *cries*

seriously annoyed. Thank goodness i have car seat covers and it had not got through the car seat cover.

I put the car seat cover in the laundry tub with soap and water and soaked it. Will it be ok to reuse now??

seriously annoyed with myself. I use so little of these things. I had visions of my car blowing up in the garage or work car park.

sigh

!becca
08-15-2012, 05:22 AM
Sarah, seriously, I would use caution with it, leave the windows open where you can to let the car dry and air out..and as for the seat cover I have heard of people washing contaminated work cloths and having them catch fire in the dryer...so I would soak twice and air dry after washing if it were me...
Maybe someone with more knowledge will have more advice.

Dave Johnson
08-17-2012, 06:38 AM
McMastercarr.com
... I use a metal can, actually it's a minnow bait bucket, and barring any local burn bans I burn the paint rags and when the ashes are cold they can safely be thrown out with the trash.

Maybe they're safe from a fire-hazard point of view, but I wouldn't recommend it for health reasons. I don't think it's a good idea to burn rags that may contain cadmiums, lead, or other toxic substances.

Sarah Edgecumbe
08-17-2012, 09:19 AM
Hmmm scary scary.

I am sure that none got onto the seat itself. It doesnt even smell. The seat cover i soaked for a very long while. Perhaps i will wash again in strong soap and let it dry in the strongest aussie sunshine i can find. Away from the house and vegetation of course. Then it either dries and is fine, or bursts into a spectacular and safe flame.

Need strong jars for my miniscule amounts of oil me thinks.

!becca
08-17-2012, 09:38 AM
Sarah, sounds like a good plan to me to rewash and air dry...

UGH
08-17-2012, 11:26 AM
Make sure to not use your electric dryer Sarah. This can ignite leftover oils.

Toril
08-17-2012, 11:26 PM
I'm wondering if I need to change my habits now...

Paper towels that I use to wipe off brushes for paint or medium or spills are thrown in an open paperbag, where they dry for weeks before I put them in the kitchen trash. The paper bag sits in my airconditioned, cross-ventilated (when I'm in there) studio (don't tell my hubby, he'd have a fit if he knew I have the windows cracked while the AC is running...).

I use Turpenoid Natural to clean my brushes in the kitchen, swishing them in a canning jar with about an inch of turp. When the turp gets too dirty, I wait until it has settled afterwards, then pour off the clear part and wipe the bottom 'silt' out with paper towels that go in the trash can in the kitchen.

!becca
08-17-2012, 11:41 PM
Toril, yes you need to change your ways; put them into something you can immerse them in water in. When my fire started it really wasn't hot, was a fairly cool day actually.

Sarah Edgecumbe
08-18-2012, 12:22 AM
Thanks UGH, I don't have an electric dryer. Aussie sun is normally good enough. So no worries there.

Am currently re-soaking the car seat cover.


QUESTION What is the time frame for things spontaneously combusting??

I understand about Oxidation being how it dries, does it then follow that the item is only likely to combust while it is drying. That being said, that the items are much more likely to combust early on rather than later?

Most of the senarios i have read about have things bursting into flames in the first 8 hours or sooner.


It has been a whole week since my linseed fell in the car. The car does not smell of linseed. (I'm almost sure none or only a very few drops got on the car...) I can see no staining on the seat. The seat cover is having it's second soap bath. I have had the basket outside in the hot hot sun for a week. (away from places where it would ignite anything but itself) and the car has obviously got super hot out in the sun.

I have had no reaction yet. How long should i treat these objects as a ticking time bomb? (which i am at present)

Lesson well learnt

thanks WC

Sarah

!becca
08-18-2012, 12:26 AM
Sarah, I wish I could tell you from my experience, but I really can't remember the time frame, though I do think they were fairly fresh.