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gmc
07-09-2002, 08:33 AM
Hi All,

Just curious. I have about two paintings I would like to mat and frame. I checked prices for mats on the computer. Matting and framing is the only drawback to using pastels and/or watercolor as far as I can tell.

I was curious as to how you all do it.

Do you custom mat through a distributor? And if so, which one?

Do you purchase ready made mats? If so, who do you purchase from?

Do you have a mat cutter and do your own?

If you own a mat cutter, which brand name is most effective and easiest to use?

Is owning a mat cutter economical in mat materials and time to warrant owning a mat cutter?

Is cutting mats difficult and wasteful in materials? Or easy enough for someone with all thumbs?

I should go back to work. I think too much when I am home.:D

Thanks for any input. geri

mf.sutton
07-09-2002, 09:04 AM
Originally posted by gloria777a
Hi All,

Just curious. I have about two paintings I would like to mat and frame. I checked prices for mats on the computer. Matting and framing is the only drawback to using pastels and/or watercolor as far as I can tell.

I was curious as to how you all do it.

Do you custom mat through a distributor? And if so, which one?

Do you purchase ready made mats? If so, who do you purchase from?

Do you have a mat cutter and do your own?

If you own a mat cutter, which brand name is most effective and easiest to use?

Is owning a mat cutter economical in mat materials and time to warrant owning a mat cutter?

Is cutting mats difficult and wasteful in materials? Or easy enough for someone with all thumbs?

I should go back to work. I think too much when I am home.:D

Thanks for any input. geri

Great questions Geri, glad you asked thats two of us want to know now. I was about to start a thread of my own, but you beat me to it :D

mike

KarenU
07-09-2002, 12:16 PM
For the few pieces that I've framed, I've used the ready made mats that I purchased at my local art supply store. Having said that, if your intention is to use these ready made mats, you have to be careful (unlike me :D) about doing consistent sizes in your art. I have several pieces that are odd sizes and obviously finding a ready made mat to fit is impossible.

I took a matting and framing class several years ago. It was a 3 session class and we did all of our cutting using a razor knife and a steel ruler. I found the class very helpful, but in the end, I didn't feel as if I could produce a "professional" looking mat. I'm sure with more practice it would become easier. The hardest part about mat cutting, for me, was getting clean corners.

I've never tried one of the mat cutters, and I think that they can be rather expensive. I suppose if I was going to mat and frame everthing I did (ha! :D) I might consider investing in one of these.

Until then, I think I'll just try to be more consistent with my sizes and stick with the ready made mats.

DFGray
07-09-2002, 02:29 PM
Hi Gloria777a
I try not to use mats anymore to much trouble and there seems no point to having cardboard behind glass my method
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=21744
regards
Dan

gmc
07-09-2002, 03:27 PM
mfSutton, I am sure we will both learn something here.

KarenU Thanks for your reply. I saw the ready made mats and I was wondering what they looked like.

Dan, I read your framing w/o mats article. I couple of questions please.

Where would one find plexi with self adhesive strips. Are you cutting the plexi to a size of 1/8 x 1/8 yourself and separately purchasing adhesive strips? from an Art Supply store?

And I'm laughing at myself here. What is a "fender washer."

And can't you see the medical tape through the glass or is it being hid by the linen liner provided with the frame.

Thanks for your help,

geri

DFGray
07-09-2002, 04:18 PM
Geri
I buy the "frame space" through a framer or a well stocked art supply store, it comes in different sizes (1/8" 1/4" etc) also black (which I am going to try)

the medical tape (or masking when framing temporarily) only goes over a small portion of the front usually just covering the frame space, it is hidden by the rabbit of the linen liner,

the fender washers are large washers with small centre openings (for the small screws that I use) from hardware stores

regards
Dan

ps when trying to save a mat with some pastel on it I use a fine grit sandpaper after removing as much of the pigment as possible with a factis eraser

chris 97
07-09-2002, 10:36 PM
if you do only a very few matts a year, it may be more economical to have someone else cut them. i do lots of watercolors and pastels so i purchased a logan 301 matt cutter, and i love it, it is very easy to use and always get good results (i cant imagine people cutting a bevel edge with a razorblade and a straight edge! i wouldnt have any fingers left , not to mention how horrible my matts would look). the spacers can be ordered from places like daniel smith, and manufacturers supple warehouse inc. i do buy my mattboard in bulk because it is cheaper that way and i use a lot of the archival stuff.......that means i have to have a place to store it (my husband built a great rolling cabinet type thing for them) also you need a large flat area....the ping pong table works great. hope all this helps........:)

chris 97
07-09-2002, 10:37 PM
ps. i buy most of my frames from graphic dimensions (they cut them to size and they are easy to assemble)

gmc
07-10-2002, 07:34 AM
Dan,

I just might try your method as I already have a few "linen-lined" frames from my oil days way back when. I am just a little confused on the assembly. Sorry, I know I am being dense. But, when you use the :D "fender washer":D and little screw, do you screw the screw through the hole of the washer? If so, how do you connect it to the frame. Lay it flat on the glass-pastel-backing piece or stand it upright so the edge of the washer is touching the glass-pastel-backing piece??

Chris97,

That's just what I am trying to figure out. I, too, have delt with Graphic Dimensions. I have purchased many frames from them. They have ready made mats, but the sizes don't correspond to the sizes I need to frame. I am wondering if buying a cutter would be economical for me.

Thanks for the valuable info on the Logan 301 cutter. I will check it out. I was thinking of going in that direction. I guess what ever way you turn it will be expensive.

KarenU :D calif. not tex :D Post your finished painting here. I am sure everyone would love to see it. And let them know the company you deal with. There are lots of branches of the store in the west. There are lot's of people here from the west. The matting was lovely.

Thanks everyone, geri

Elinor
07-10-2002, 10:44 AM
This idea looks pretty neat. You are basically using a frame you would use for an oil painting but with glass. I would love to try this as I have always loved pastels but the framing is so expensive if you have it done.

Just one question. If you want to enter into a juried show is this type of matting acceptable for pastels.

Dan your work looks beautifull.

DFGray
07-10-2002, 01:13 PM
Hi Geri
I screw through the hole in the washer flat to the liner and about 1/3 of the washer is overlaping the glass/pastel/backing sandwich I use a short screw so it won't go right through the liner and a large washer so that there is enough overlap to hold the sandwich in to the frame
I am changing pieces all the time so this is for ease and less stress on the frames also it is a easy package for galleries to store without frames
as for shows I have never had a problem with this type of framing
make sense?
regards
Dan

gmc
07-10-2002, 02:45 PM
Dan,

Thanks, it makes a great deal of sense.

Just came back from the hardware store with some supplies and took my liner frames from the closet. Luckily I had two, just what I need.

Will certainly give it a try.

Thanks very much for your help. geri

Katherine J
07-10-2002, 04:59 PM
Just a suggestion, gloria777a, if you ever do decide to use mats with your pastels: I always have the mat immediately next to the painting cut with a reverse bevel edge. That way, if there is any dust falling from the painting, it falls behind the mat. Unfortunately, precut mats don't come this way!

Katherine

Elinor
07-11-2002, 09:25 AM
Thanks Its good to know you can frame pastels this way.A friend of mine entered a w/c and she was told it probably wouldnt get accepted because it didnt have a white matting and she wasnt.

maverick
07-11-2002, 11:14 PM
I just framed this today using Dan's method (thanks for the tip!) I really love the results. I used foam core for a backing and cut thin strips of the remainder to use as spacers. Not the neatest cutting job, so I will try harder to find the proper spacers next time. Everything is acid free of course. I also put some kraft paper on the back with double sided tape.

Anna Marie
07-13-2002, 06:51 PM
I never can paint to standard sizes so I have all my frames and mats made locally Golden Vale Pictures in Gloucester City Centre right near the Cathedral I always double mat as I feel it sets my pictures off better.

I have looked everywhere for the foam core board you refer to and if you can get it in the UK it is certainlly called something else!

maverick
07-13-2002, 11:32 PM
I think you are right. Try polyboard. I found this info from a UK Web site:

http://www.polydraft.co.uk/Print%20finishing.htm

Anna Marie
07-14-2002, 08:37 AM
Eureka Maverick thanks a bunch.