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View Full Version : The Oil Gusher April 28 - May 4


Pat Isaac
04-28-2008, 07:36 AM
Good morning everyone,

Wow, we are heading into May....and the weather has returned to March. We will be getting some beneficial rain though.
I have to gallery sit today for a gallery that I am in. Everyone has to take a turn. I hoope to get some drawings done for new paitings.
So come in and share your joys, concerns...or just the day to day routine and lets get aquainted.

Have a great day:) :) :)

Pat

Art by Anima
04-29-2008, 12:09 PM
Hi everyone,
I'm currently working on a large triptych (3 36" x 36" canvases), but it's in acrylic paint. Hopefully it'll be complete in the next 10 days so I can get back to my oil pastel works.

Pat Isaac
04-29-2008, 04:27 PM
Please give us a link when you finish, Anima.
I did manage to get one drawing done for a new painting while gallery sitting. I also read a lot of my current book.
Today I went back to the gym as my hideous rash is gone. I am also trying to set up a PDF file of the magazine article of our artist group.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
04-29-2008, 06:15 PM
Please give us a link when you finish, Anima.
I did manage to get one drawing done for a new painting while gallery sitting. I also read a lot of my current book.
Today I went back to the gym as my hideous rash is gone. I am also trying to set up a PDF file of the magazine article of our artist group.

Pat

Pat: congrats on ditching that pesky rash! Guess you can "scratch" that problem off your list :lol: :lol: (Oh No, I hear them saying! We thought maybe they would keep him NC!!!!!)

Not a chance.

You can be thankful, though, that after completing a hypomanic, longwinded post here yesterday and hitting submit evereything locked up and I lost it. Frustrated, I shut down!

I can't remember what I've told and haven't, so forgive me if I repeat myself. I think I told you about finding the Leslie book for $15 at the Milwaukee airport. Have been reading it and, all due respect to Elliott, it is far better than his book in coverage and diversity of information conveyed. I was glad to see that he covers use of Oil Bars (Sticks) along with OP.

There were some interesting things I discovered. First, he talks about using OP in a pseudoencaustic method by placing the support on a hot sheet (about 125 degrees) to soften even the hardest OP. This was something I had been experimenting with, although I was trying to melt the OP and apply them (after seeing the work of an ecaustic artist from here in town that won best of show at the festival of arts last year). He revels in working with OP in hot areas with their gooey consistency.

One thing that caught my eye was a comment that Senns contained small ammounts of siccative oil and that the company recommended using them within 2 years or they might begin to harden. (I don't know if this is still the case).

His lightfast tests (images attached) were interesting. If memory serves me correctly, it seems I remember it being stated some places that his tests found student grades performing as well as artists, in some cases. That is certainly not what he reports. He found on 1 Senn that showed slight fading, Holb and NeoPs were good but had a few colors that faded. He stated that Grummbacher and Craypas "were not impressively lightfast" with many colors badly fading. Talens Panda brand he found virtually every color faded. Clearly formulations have changed, but having seen his approach I think I'll soon try to set up some initial trials using constant artificial illumination rather than sticking the strips out on sunny days as he did. The fading he shows is dramatic.


Finally, for now, in another book on materials I picked up there was discussion of OP in relation to Pastel and Crayon. One interesting observation was that as far back as the sixteenth century artists had been periodically experimenting with soaking dry media in oil or wax overnight to produce crayon-like sticks. This was particularly true of charcoal sticks. Crayons as we consider them today became more common and were well established in the 19th century. It sure seems that there is much we do not know regarding stick like drawing/painting media made from various pigment, oil, wax, damar, resins,etc. combinations dating far before the Sakura, Panda, Sennelier story of the NEW medium of Oil Pastel as we always see it told.

Enquiring minds want to know.

More later. Having trouble getting caught up with everything going on here. How do you do it Pat?????

Bill

Pat Isaac
04-29-2008, 06:41 PM
:eek: I don't, Bill....Miss some stuff and I have all of your watchful eyes to remind me.....
You did tell us about the books and I couldn't agree with you more about the info in Leslie's book. You are right about the drawing media, and I remember in my lithograph classes in college we used an oil type drawing tool the was called a lithograph pencil...suitable name right?. This was oil based and much like the crayon that was used for marking laundry tags. Not sure of the exact content. There is a lot out there that may have been the beginnings of OPs as we know them. I think many of the pro brands of OPs have improved greatly since his book.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
04-30-2008, 03:03 AM
:eek: I don't, Bill....Miss some stuff and I have all of your watchful eyes to remind me.....
You did tell us about the books and I couldn't agree with you more about the info in Leslie's book. You are right about the drawing media, and I remember in my lithograph classes in college we used an oil type drawing tool the was called a lithograph pencil...suitable name right?. This was oil based and much like the crayon that was used for marking laundry tags. Not sure of the exact content. There is a lot out there that may have been the beginnings of OPs as we know them. I think many of the pro brands of OPs have improved greatly since his book.

Pat

I have some historical info on lithograph crayons. I am fascinated by the similarity between OP and Encaustic. I think I am going to start a Journal and try to document this stuff since it is getting so confusing. What surprised me was the number of artists whose work Leslie displayed in his book. These were artists that were doing some incredible work around 15 years ago.

I am going to try and see if Leslie is still around and interested in OP. I also have a contact lead on the faculty here in Fine Arts that is interested in early art history and I want to talk to him and see what he knows about Oil/Wax based stick media.

I think the Picasso thread raised many questions about the boilerplate OP history.

I also agree that much has probably changed in the formulations since Leslie, but with his book in hand I have a starting point to set up test strips of modern brands and see how they compare.

What was your reaction to the statement that Sennelier contained some siccative oil. Was the first I had heard of that and would be important to know if that is still the case!

Interestingly, Leslie started with OP as a medium to INITIATE oil paintings. That would be contrary to what we have discussed about the oil media going down first.

He includes a really slick way to produced fine, repetitive deatil that blew me away. Trace a pattern on vellum. Lay down blocks of OP thickly on scrap paper that are the colors you want. Place the velum over each color in sequence and trance appropriate areas with blunt tip to pick up color like ink from inkpad.
Oncea all the colors are loaded, place velum with OP on back down on area for pattern and rub with back of spoon or burnisher to transfer the detailed color you have picked up. Same basic idea as scrubbing OP on back of drawing to transfer, but done so with more planning and elegance. He produced a tiny patch of wallpaper with tiny flowers and stems laid over a light yellow OP layer!

So much to learn, so little time. Must set down a plan to deal with some of these interesting questions since so much is getting buried in library threads and I forget about it.

I also picked up two of Wilcox's books on color. His classic Blue and Yellow dont make green and an incredible guide to all major brands of watercolor that most of the manufacturers cooperated in providing info and samples for testing. Wonder if he ever considered OP as his School of Color has put out similar guides to other media?

My mind is whirling, coulndn't sleep. My sister called tonight and one of my nieces stepped off the back of a truck while packing to move and shattered both bones in one of her lower legs and was in surgery. My brother is undergoing surgery for early Prostate Cancer tomorrow, and my sister is facing cataract surgery in both eyes in late May. Not a relaxing night, but I am going down in late May for my Grand Nieces wedding and staying over while she has her eye surgery. I know you understand with the health problems you and your husband have had. I've been having problems with my right knee for a while and am going to and orthopedic speialists on Monday to have it checked out.

So much for my soap opera. Have to keep a positive outlook! (Although my opthamologists inidcated early signs of cataracts in my eyes, too. Probably a while before they will need action, but frustrating.

Retired and now seems like everything is falling apart! Someone posted a neat quote in the art quotes thread

Artists don't get down to work until the pain of working is exceeded by the pain of not working. - Stephen DeStaebler

But oh what a solace just looking and thinking about it can be. Took some pics at the NC Museum of Art I will try to post in Image library.

Take Care!

Pat Isaac
04-30-2008, 09:13 AM
So sorry to hear about all the health problems with family. I hope everyone will be okay. My husband had cataract surgery several years ago and thought it was a piece of cake. He was so happy to be able to see again. However, now he has a cloud behind the pupil in that eye which they say is very common so he will go have it zapped with a laser and all will be well again.

I'll have to take a peek at Leslie's book again, as I haven't looked at it in a long while. I do remember he had some good techniques in it and some very good artists. I know he was teaching in Vermont and I believe he is still there, at Johnson State College. This is a link to the site. http://www.jsc.edu/Academics/FineAndPerformingArts/Faculty/KenLeslie.aspx#

As far as the siccative oil in Senneliers I don't recall Sennelier mentioning that as part of their makeup. I'll look at the site again.

Big studio day.....Have a good one everyone.

Pat

AngelaF
05-01-2008, 11:52 AM
Also sorry to hear about all of the health problems in your family. I agree that most people who have cataract surgery do not have problems and are very glad to have the good vision afterwards. Hope all goes well with your brother's surgery today. Hope you get a simple fix for your knee. I know what you mean about retirement and health -- I lost my first tooth earlier this year -- I have been avoiding the cost of a bridge -- yikes that puts and unexpected hole in the budget.

Hope you had a good studio day, yesterday Pat.

I have been putting morning time in my oil pastel painting, doing chores, etc. in the afternoon and practising using color pencils in the evening. Almost done with my recent horse OP and hope to post soon.

It unexpected ly snowd 2 inches here overnight Monday! We measured it. It was gone by noon though. Plants seem to have survived it well. Happy Painting All, Angela

Scarefishcrow
05-01-2008, 01:54 PM
Thanks all for the good wishes. My brother's surgery went well and since the early biopsies showed very early stages I think the prognosis should be good. My niece shattered the tops of both the tibia and fibula and had surgery for reconstruction with plates and pins but faces considerable reuperative period. To top it off, my Grand Nephew (namesake getting married in August) was beaten up severely after he stopped at a convenience store and has no recall of what happened (and of course no one else saw anything).

So, things could be much worse and I am looking forward to going down to LA late in May for my Grand Niece's wedding and stay over till my sister's eye surgery and visit my brother. Also will go down and see my new namesake (Will) born recently to my sister's only son and his new wife. Also have several recently added Great Grand Nieces and Nephews I'll get to see for the first time.

I have to sign off. Having the annual retirement reception at the University and I have to go pick up my cute little certificate that says I was a good boy for 30.5 years. I am now officially Professor Emeritus of Biology. Nice ring, huh?

More later.

Peiwend
05-01-2008, 04:27 PM
Bill, I'm so sorry to hear about the medical problems and also about your grand nephew. I hope things get better soon and you have my best wishes.

Congratulations on your retirement. It's nice to know that you were well behaved for 30.5 years but, I think, we'd rather hear about the bad behavior of the other years! I haven't even managed to be well behaved for .5 years, let alone 30.5.
________________________________Wendell

Pat Isaac
05-01-2008, 04:28 PM
What a terrible thing to happen to your Grand Nephew. I hope he will be okay. Glad to hear that your brother's surgery went well and he is out of the woods.
Congratulations on your award, Bill and it does have a nice ring to it. My husband also has an emeritus attached to his name, but the lowly public school teacher gets a goodbye....oh I forgot a little plaque that says in appreciation for your years of service. :D
I had a nice respite from the studio today. I was asked to be a judge for high school portfolios being submitted for scholarship to a local art association. They give 5 scholarships ranging from $1000 to $100. We reviewed 18 portfolios from surrounding towns. Several just stood out from the others, but it was noticeable how much art has been taken out of the schools. There were none from my town and we used to submit as many as 10. I was amazed at the towns that were missing. Sad. I did enjoy looking at the work though and we also looked at adult portfolios of people who were pursuing their art career.
Orchestra tonight before our last 2 major concerts this weekend.
Looks as if you have a good schedule going, Angela. Glad the snow melted quickly and the old farmers always said that this was poor man's fertilizer.

Pat

Pat Isaac
05-01-2008, 04:41 PM
:lol: :lol: Wendell...I'm was never well behaved....

Pat:angel:

lisasb
05-02-2008, 10:02 AM
Bill, I'm so sorry to hear about the health problems of your family, and it's horrifying to hear of your grandnephew getting beaten up! So scary, I hope he'll be OK.

And I hope your knee problem improves, spring is coming, I know warmer weather always makes the body feel better.

BTW, professor emeritus, I'm really interested in the lightfastness testing you were talking about. I don't have a ton of time, but I'd be happy to put my OPs to the test. I love experimenting, so if you need a guinea pig, let me know.

I'm intrigued by the Sennelier siccative info, I have a couple of Sennelier blues, esp. Prussian, that I've had for over two years that are really gluey and sticky, I wonder if they're drying out? (Part of the reason I gave up on OPs before was these blues).

Lisa.

Scarefishcrow
05-02-2008, 01:53 PM
Thanks for all the well wishes.
You know Chris directed me to some things in the "debate" forum and it was just nasty there. (As Wendell and Pat can probably remember, years of working in an "institution" (sometimes you are not sure what kind) you learn how, when necessary, to hone the fine art of talking rudely to people in a polite, almost self depricating, manner. It is a high art, but one that should be reserved for use when absolutely necessary. Unfortunately, the folks int the "debate" forum (as expected if you know anything about debate) spend enormous amounts of creative energy finding polite ways to put down others' views.

That is why I rarely venture beyond the cozy confines of our little forum, because it is filled with nice people that know the difference between "liking" a piece of art and "appreciating art you may not particularly like". This is a concept that seems foreign to some people. They equate good art with what they happen to like and everything else is bad art (or "illustration", how horrible, you men people draw and paint to make money! PHILISTINES! ).

Anyway, my Grand Nephew is a little worse for the wear but otherwise young and will heal quickly. He apparently remembers nothing of what happened. We think all will be well with my brother; waiting for final analysis of the tissue samples. My Niece had the worst of it and shattered the tops of both her tibia and fibula and it had to be reconstructed with plates and pins and she will most likely have to have a knee replacement as she gets older.

BTW, if you knew my family, you would probably realize that somehow there is always some crisis du jour, and only occasionally do they seem to synchronize and all come at once as now. Things could be MUCH worse.

Pat, as a third generation teacher and with my Mother having taught almost 40 years in the public schools and my sister currently principal of a new middle school (moved there from her beloved elementary because she had expeience in getting performance testing scores up), I know exactly how little appreciation teachers get.

Don't be fooled by the Emeritus, that and a Starbucks card will get you a frappuchino. We got nice certificiates, they read off only what they wanted to from the information you gave them and reduced your 31 years of hard work to a 3x5 notecard of inane pablum. But I love the school, despise the ignorant pony with long ears that is currently chancellor and she is a combination of a buffoon and a tsar. She fired one of the best deans (and we had good ones) that ever served in our college because he wouldn't bow to her every wish.

At the reception yesterday, she asked the Vice Chancellor to come help her with the "Alphabet" handing out the awards (I kid you not). He came up and told her he would take care of it and she could stand down where we could have our picture taken with her. Her response.. "You mean you don't need my help?". (I wish I were making this up, oh Lord how I wish I were making this up!). I have served with every Chancellor since we switched to a merged UW- System, and she is hands down the absolute worst, inane, intolerant, self absorbed idiot I have ever encountered in an administrative position. (And after 31 years, Pat and Wendell can probably agree that we all have met our share of bad ones.

Anyway, after last night, I decided now that I have vented, I refuse to let idiots like her spoil my love for that instistution, and love her I do.

As the vice chancellor thanked me for the help I had given him in his first year (she also drove the last vc out) he sort of embraced me and I told him to take care of "her" (the school). I have good friends on the foundation board and plan to get myself appointed as a board member and do everything I can to make her life a living "place of great discomfort and punishment for imprudent acts" on earth. I am kind, timid, shy, introverted, tolerant, sensitive, empathetic and compassionate. But when I see anyone hurting someone or something I love, watch out, because I can turn into one mean "donkey with long ears" "offspring of a female dog" that can inflict serious verbal damage (my preference to physical confrontation).

Hmm..I'm beginning to think I haven't really quite let go of my frustration. Ya'll think I'm still clinging to a bit of negativity?

Wait a minute, Pat, what does the president of your association look like???? I'm wondering is our chancellor leads a double life or has a clone???? Dear Lord, don't let them start mass marketing them!!!! EEEEK.

Okay, enough venting.
Lisa, I would love to work with you and anyone else on some experiments. My life has been tumultuous recently, but let's keep talking. The issue of fading under glass vs. fading with no glass is a very good issue. Perhaps with your plentiful sun and willingness to drive around with OP strips taped to you car's window, I have complete or almost complete sets of quite a few brands. I would be willing to make a standardized test strip and send some to you to add to your Pentel's. I am planning a box with continuous artificial (incandescent vs. fluorescent) to expose strips to 24/7 light. The Erengi fluorescents are NOT lightfast and I plan to try a dry run with them to see how quickly I can achieve significant fading. I plan to mount some small video cameras that I can catch daily images of the strips and actually put together into a timelapse segment that can be used to demonstrate the fading over time!!

Leaving for Chicago this afternoon to visit the Art Institute and get in an hour before the paying public to see their exhibitions on Homer's development of his waterrcolor methods and an exhibition on Hopper (not one of my favorites, but still some interesting work. I view him as somewhat of a 20th century Gauguin in that he tends toward rather flat color and simple modelling, emphasizing geometric form and contrasts in lighting rather than 3 dimensionality. Just IMHO).

Pat--I'll keep my eye out for Gulls;

Wendell--Actually I picked up a book on the Hudson River School and may try some of Bierstadt and Church. Only I'm not sure I'm upt to covering an entire sheet and a half of plywood unless I get some of those big honker Senns.

BTW, At Jerry's store in NC, I saw Mungyo (Gallery) OPs labelled as artist sets and the HUGE size ones like Senn makes?

Pat.. I went to Leslie's site and he is still active. I may drop him a note and see what his interest in OP still is. He has gone into some interesting and novel three dimentional paintings he calls "Artists Books".

Ciao, all my cyberfriends
(maybe I will stay put long enough to paint soon; really want to do that old barn in the May challenge!)

Shirl Parker
05-02-2008, 01:58 PM
Bill, If you want us to be able to read, you need some paragraph breaks. Please.

Scarefishcrow
05-02-2008, 02:03 PM
Bill, If you want us to be able to read, you need some paragraph breaks. Please.

My apologies. I was working in Firefox and it took out all the paragraph breaks.

My apologies.

Scarefishcrow
05-02-2008, 02:07 PM
Bill, If you want us to be able to read, you need some paragraph breaks. Please.

I turned off the script blocker in firefox and put the paragraphs back in!!!

Sorry.

Scarefishcrow
05-02-2008, 02:11 PM
:lol: :lol: Wendell...I'm was never well behaved....

Pat:angel:
Pat, you little :evil:. Want to share some good stories with us?? How bout some of those college days incidents????? Hmmm?? I was so timid :o I'v always wondered what the fun folks like you did while I sat watching TV at the Baptist Student Center on campus?

We won't tell!

Shirl Parker
05-02-2008, 02:14 PM
Thanks Bill.

wabbitt
05-02-2008, 04:33 PM
Hi everyone :wave:

Bill, don't hold back, tell us what you really think :lol: Seriously, count me in with the good wishes for your brother's speedy recovery. Glad the grand-nephew is doing okay, what a terrible thing to happen. Do enjoy the Art Institute. I think Hopalong/Lindsay took us there once...don't remember if she had pictures or a really great description. Congrats on the retirement.

I've been a little quiet on this site lately for all the crazy busy stuff going on in my life. But that's going to slow down in a couple weeks as I turn in my final portfolio next Tuesday and final self portrait the following Tuesday. I finally decided on a composition and I've decided to do it in oil pastel on black gesso. That should get a good reaction from the class. After I get it back I'll show you this semester's progress in self portraits. Work has also been crazy busy, which will also lighten up sometime next week. Been working late and weekends in the past month.

Mom picked out her Mother's Day present early and we're doing lunch with my aunt this weekend. Yay, gets lots of stuff out of the way.

Pat Isaac
05-02-2008, 05:05 PM
Good luck, Julie with your final review. I'll be looking forward to your self portrait series as you were doing so well with this. It's always nice when life slows down a little. My DH always says to me "What do you mean, things will slow down next week, you will find more to do" Sigh, I think he is right...:rolleyes:

Bill, I am so happy to hear that your nephew will be fine. What a scary thing to happen. Also happy to hear your brother will be fine. That is a lot of surgery for your niece, but they do amazing things now, though the recovery may be long.

I think I finished my boat painting today except for a few tweakings and am now half finished with the croci. I am not signing up for another show for a few years at least. I need some down time. I say this everytime I do a show...:eek: :rolleyes:

Those in the upper echelons of education really get to me. Many of them have never been in a classroom and they just don't get it. If it looks good on paper, hey, it must be okay. Don't get me started....:evil: I did love my job, especially the kids. They were wonderful.

Okay, have to sign off as I have a concert tonight.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
05-02-2008, 05:27 PM
Ditto on love the kids, Pat. Sorry to hear about your problems Julie. Sometimes it is nice to have place like this just to vent your frustrations whether or not anyone reads them or not, know what I mean? So just skip over the posts from that idiot with the stupid scrambled up username that seems to have something to do with the Wizard of Oz and and Avatar that looks like Van Gogh so people think he knows what he's talking about.

He is really relatively harmless. All blow and no show, if you know what I mean. But I know him well and he really has a good heart, just like Wendell, although both of them are prone to periodic bouts of blustery expulsions of Hot Air (Wendell much less so since he is generally occupied swatting fruiflies and chasing croci eating voles. He's one heck of an artist, though! And pretty sharp witted for a guy his age!!!!!:lol: :lol: :lol: :evil: :evil: )

Only kidding Wendell.
:music: :music: :music: :heart: :heart: :heart: :music: :music: :music:
Have a great concert, Pat! Knock em' dead!
:music:

Pat Isaac
05-03-2008, 04:41 PM
Stories of my college days :eek: :eek: I was in art school remember :rolleyes: When I started dating my husband, I was a junior and he came to the school ONCE to pick me and didn't darken the doors again...:lol: He is used to it now.
The concert went well, though I really screwed up the Warsaw Concerto...not used to 5 sharps:eek: and we hadn't rehearsed it that much. Fortunately, there were a lot of other instruments playing at the time. Another concert tomorrow and that is not on the program.
I spent the morning taking in work for one of our local art associations and then delivered work to another...
We are going out for a leisurely dinner tonight.

Pat

Scarefishcrow
05-03-2008, 08:01 PM
Hello everyone from the Windy City. We went to AIC before 9 am (when they opened an hour early for members to get in to see the exhibitions before the public). I didn't take camera since you know rules about special exhibitions.

We went through the Winslow Homer exhibition first. I had been reading the book AIC and the Terra Foundation for American art put our about the exhibition. It wasn't the catalog but the results of a study that was the genesis of the exhibition. AIC has a very nice holding of 25 of Homer's watercolors and began a study of them in an effort to determine how his method developed over time. It is a wonderfully informative book Watercolors by Winslow Homer: color and light ISBN 978-0-300-11945.

I never cease to be amazed at how even the BEST reproduction cannot capture the brilliance and subtlty of color (even somehat faded in some of these works) that paintings exude when seen "in the flesh". In fact, while I appreciate Hopper, I can't say he was high on my list of favorite artists, but that exhibit (especially his rarely discussed earlier works) show a vibrance of color that has made me reevaluate at least segments of his career. I still find his latter (most iconic) works among those that seem to least showcase the incredible talent he was capable of. In fact, I feel IMHO that what we generally see of Hopper's work in the later stages of his life seem to reflect a melancholoy and almost disillusionment with life. Not really a dark side, but much loneliness that may have reflected unhappiness in his own life and marriage. Some of his earlier works, such as a series done at, ironically with the Homer exhibit next to it, at Glouchester have a much different style and feel. Some of his sea scenes are surprisingly bright, almost radiantly light and airy. Quite a contrast to Nighthawks or Morning Sun!

Anyway (and I know it isn't OP, but it certainly shows how a medium can be used in unconventional and varied ways by creative artists), Homer's watercolors was a fascinating exhibit as it showed his evolution from mainly an oil painter to a long fascination with watercolor and evolution from its use in opaque form much as oils. Beginning by painting opaquely with wc from dark to light and only slowly evolving to embrace (though never completely) the use of wc in its translucent mode.

It also showed how his early days as a draftsman for lithographic or woodcut illustrations affected how he used this "new" medium. He continued to combine wc with reinforcement of crisp edges with graphite.

He was quite reclusive and would travel, e.g., to britain and stay for a short while in the center of the art scene, absorbing as much as he could of new ideas, then isolate himself in some remote village (Cullercoat in England) and experiment extensively with what knew knowledge he had acquired.

I also learned the value of repeating elements in different paintings to try different applications, or adding elements to a painting that were voiced by color with objects when the painting would be translated into an engraved illustration where the color effect would lose its impact.

And on top of it all....DICK BLICK HAS A MULTISTORY STORE NEAR THE AIC/ My wife even went there with me and I am now officially BROKE. I picked up some Stonehenge (large pad) paper, and some smaller Wallis (sanded) paper along with a set of 48 Van Gogh OP's. Almost all but a few have a lightfast rating of +++, maybe 6 with ++. They have some beautiful colors and I will photo and post a color chart in my thread when I get home. They were quite reasonable (30+ dollars for 48) and quick trial makes me think they may have reformulated them. They are still rather firm, but color realeases fairly easily and with out extreme pressure as I remember. I thought I would get them since I want to test light fastness of as many brands as I can.

Pat...They had those marvelous RF oil sticks, but the prices took my breath away. I'm afraid I'm gonna have to stick with my Shiva and Kama's for a while. I see why you like them. They are about as close to holding a tube of oil paint, sans the tube, in your hand that you could possibly come.

I did pick up a few additional Shiva's to supplement the basic set of 12 I got in NC. Also picked up a neat little table .... (not sure what to call it)... workstation, maybe. It is a base with a modest sized flat work surface that holds your support with two wingnut clamps in either landscape or portrait mode. It is attached to a ball and socket joint that can be easily loosened with a large wooden knob so the surface can be rotated, tilted in almost any conceivable direction. I'll post a pic later.

Much fun, and got good news from my brother's biopsies indicating all the cancer was removed and an excelent prognosis. That made it an even greater day.

Scarefishcrow
05-03-2008, 08:18 PM
Stories of my college days :eek: :eek: I was in art school remember :rolleyes: When I started dating my husband, I was a junior and he came to the school ONCE to pick me and didn't darken the doors again...:lol: He is used to it now.
The concert went well, though I really screwed up the Warsaw Concerto...not used to 5 sharps:eek: and we hadn't rehearsed it that much. Fortunately, there were a lot of other instruments playing at the time. Another concert tomorrow and that is not on the program.
I spent the morning taking in work for one of our local art associations and then delivered work to another...
We are going out for a leisurely dinner tonight.

Pat

Just explain that it was the Wausau (WI) Concerto, not the Warsaw!!!! :lol: :lol:

I have learned in our chorale (because I have a fairly prominent Barritone voice) to keep moving my lips but not really sing anything when we get to a passage I just cand seem to get. Seems to work ok when, like you say, there are lots of others making noise. The thing I always fear is overconfidence and booming in at one of those points when there is absolutely nothing else to cover up your "sore thumb"!

We had a better audience for out second performance of Rejoice in the Lamb and Prayers from the Ark. Like the Britten, but that Christopher Smart was one strange dude. I looked up the entire set of free verse poetry from which Britten drew his text and it is about 30 pages of very strange stuff. If you thought Nimrod, Ithamar and others mentioned in Britten were sort of off the beaten path, you should see how many more exotic biblical characters he talks about!

Mental health treatment may not have been very nice in those days, but all his keys were definitely NOT playing the same tune!

Hope everyone is doing well. Nothing like seeing art in the flesh to lift your spirits!!!!!!

:music: :music: :heart: :wave: :cat: :music: :music:
P.S. We are staying in the Burnham Hotel in Chicago (http://www.burnhamhotel.com/ ) which is part of this Eco-Friendly Hotel Chain called Kimpton (http://www.kimptonhotels.com/ ). They even let you bring your pet if you want and if you don't have a live goldfish in the room so you won't miss them!! apparently all their hotels are rennovated historic buildings. This one is the Reliance Bldg. in Chicago that was a forerunner of the glass and steel skyscrapers. It was originally an office building. Very interesting.

Going to this fab Itilian Restaurant that a friend described to my wife as looking like a place the mafia might hang out. Magiano's. Fab place if you are ever in Chi Town and like really good italian. Get a reservation early, though.