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Maddy-kins
04-22-2008, 06:57 PM
Hello,

I was wondering if anyone can give me some tips on paper choice...I have seen a lot of the work you contributors put up so I know you have the expertise to let me know. So far I have tried velour paper and Canson Mi-Tientes paper. I like the look of the velour but its so delicate, and the Canson seems to show too much texture (or is it that I may not be layering enough to smooth it out?) Sorry I don't have a photo at the time to put up, but I was hoping someone could give me more options to try for a good balance between good tooth and smooth texture effects.

Thanks!

CM Neidhofer
04-22-2008, 07:36 PM
My two regular choices are Colourfix sanded paper and Ampersand Pastelbord. I like Wallis sanded as well, but cost factors keep me going with the first two.

Christine

binkie
04-22-2008, 07:46 PM
Hi! Welcome. Have you checked out the pastel library? It's got tons of info. Here's the link: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=65

Where in So. Ca are you? I'm north of San Diego.

binkie

NickyW
04-22-2008, 07:56 PM
Hi Maddy and welcome to WC, I use Art Spectrum Colourfix Paper, i used it once and stuck with it as its just lovely to use..but experiment with different papers and im sure you will find a few you will stick too..Enjoy experimenting. Look forward to seeing your work soon..

sielograms
04-22-2008, 08:57 PM
One way to find out what you like best is to get a sampler packet of paper. Dakota Pastel has one that is not very expensive. It's a lot of fun to experiment with all the various supports available. I like colorfix, and Uart. The Uart used to be called Estra, it comes in different grits 400, 600, and 800. The colorfix and Uart hold more layers of pastel than the canson. You mentioned the canson showed too much texture, the paper has a smooth side and a rough side. Could it be that you were using the rough side? Looking forward to seeing some of your work. Have fun!
Sharon

plindley
04-23-2008, 10:42 AM
I agree... experiment! While we all want to 'make paintings' I often find my best work happens when I take the pressure off myself and approach a piece as a 'learning to paint' experience instead. I have tried putting thinned gesso on paper (it adds tooth) or acid-free matt board (both sides so it won't warp), Sennelier pastelboard is lovely to work on too (a bit pricey), have yet to try Wallis board (can't get it locally) and just bought colour fix (only could get small... I tend to work big). Have FUN!

annepropst
04-23-2008, 04:30 PM
Boy, you will get lots of advice as we all have our favorites. I did note that you wanted something smooth. Go to your local framers and buy some suede matboard and you will be amazed at how well it works. If you like a touch paper that can take anything and will work for loose as well as blended works, try the Wallis. You just can't hurt it.

Maddy-kins
04-23-2008, 05:49 PM
Thank you all for your insight! I will definately try your suggestions and post the results in the future! I will start with the colorfix since that seems to be favored by many of you. Binkie, I live in the high desert in Yucca Valley. A little out of the way, but it is a community very supportive of artists (although it would be nice to be nearer to the coast as you are!)

palettetalk
04-23-2008, 07:42 PM
My favourite is Le Carte sanded paper by Sennilier. it can't take any water but it is sturdy, you can erase on it and the tooth is perfect for lots of blending.

Welcome to Wet canvas.
Cheers,
Susan

GaryNorthants
04-24-2008, 07:45 AM
Hi Maddykins and welcome. A year ago I was totally confused with all of the different surfaces that folks were using, especially since I have no local suppliers where I can go to touch and feel them. It's mail order and Ebay for most of my paper supplies. La Carte quickly became my favourite and Ingres and Canson were pretty much last on my list. I have to say that has changed these days as I have begun to understand different techniques a little. Apart from the choice of colours to work on the different papers will allow a lot or little detail which may or may not suit the finished look that you want. This link may be useful to you.
http://www.portra.co.uk/Insight/Paper_Tests/paper_tests.html
Look forward to seeing your paintings here, have fun
Gary

scall0way
04-24-2008, 09:38 AM
Hi Maddy, all sorts of great advice here. People are opinionated about their faves. My own *favorite* is Colourfix but I almost never use it because it is not produced in a size I would want to work in.

So most of the time I use Canson. I see that in this particular thread no one addressed your concern about Canson showing too much texture. Canson paper has a "right" side and a "wrong" side. The so-called "right" side has a bumpy texture, and is clearly the side the manufacturer expects to be the "front" (as when I buy it in individual sheets the price stickers and UPC codes are always on the other side).

However *most* people seem to feel that side is much more difficult to work with. I *hated* Canson paper when I first used it because I was trying to use the "right" side. But I learned here that many people flip it over and use the "wrong" side, which is smoother. It works pretty nicely and does not have that nubby texture. Most of my stuff these days, like "A Plateful of Apples" which I just posted over at the SPS last night, are done on Canson - so you can see that people can achieve quite smooth affects with it - and the price is usually right. :)

plindley
04-24-2008, 12:20 PM
I agree about the 'bubble wrap' effect you get with Canson paper. You end up fighting it to get any other texture to stand out, unless you really use a very thick coat of pastel. It is just TOO regular! Sometimes it is a matter of how much control you want.... high realism would seem to require a very even surface. I have found that I can push myself to a looser technique (which I am striving for) by selecting a very rough or even irregular surface. It won't allow really accurate detail so it helps me not get bogged down in it. And we all know how easy it is for that to happen!

BruceF
04-24-2008, 05:19 PM
<snip>
So most of the time I use Canson. I see that in this particular thread no one addressed your concern about Canson showing too much texture. Canson paper has a "right" side and a "wrong" side. The so-called "right" side has a bumpy texture, and is clearly the side the manufacturer expects to be the "front" (as when I buy it in individual sheets the price stickers and UPC codes are always on the other side).

However *most* people seem to feel that side is much more difficult to work with. I *hated* Canson paper when I first used it because I was trying to use the "right" side. But I learned here that many people flip it over and use the "wrong" side, which is smoother. It works pretty nicely and does not have that nubby texture. <snip>

I agree with Debbie. I often use Canson on the smooth side. And you'll find a number of well known artists (Daniel Greene comes to mind) that use it as well. I know some artists will lightly run 400 grit or finer sandpaper over the smooth side to open up the paper. I haven't tried this, yet.

The textured side (for Canson or other textured/laid papers) can be used when you think it will enhance the overall painting.

I also use and love Wallis paper fairly often.