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Enid Goyers
04-16-2008, 02:35 PM
HI,
How do I paint small, tiny but straight lines with pastel crayons? I find the crayons to be too think for the small lines. Anybody there with a hot advice for me?
Thanks.
Enid

Susan Jenkins
04-16-2008, 02:40 PM
So glad you posted this question! I'm wondering the same thing. I've tried pastel pencils, but sometimes they seem too harsh. I can't wait to hear the responses.

:) equally as curious
susan

klord
04-16-2008, 02:43 PM
Hi Enid,

You can use the edge of a square pastel to create a nice sharp edge. If you have only rounded pastels, you can rub till you get two corner shapes, this will eat up some of the pastel, but will create a sharp edge for your to lay down on your surface. I am sure there will be other suggestions forthcoming!

chewie
04-16-2008, 02:44 PM
yup, gotcha covered on this one and its simple....take a card like business card, index card, just a small stiff card. then put a piece of wadded up tape or some of that blu-tac on the back for a 'handle'. sharpen either your pastel pencil (works best for this) or a harder type pastel to a nice point. use the card as a ruler, then lift off the surface. it won't mark up the painting, leaves a perfect line. another is to take that hard pastel, which are usually square, and use the square edge and just push or pull it quickly and 'short', makes a dandy line for something like distant trees. it wont' be as even thru-out the length of the line as the card thing tho. hope this made sense!

Trilby
04-16-2008, 03:14 PM
I just watched a DVD by Greg Biolchini (very recommendable too) and he gets a very sharp point by dragging his pastel across a dry wall screen he gets from the hardware or DIY store. It comes packaged with 3 screens which he just leaves in the package. He also uses it to square off one side of a round pastel and he can use either the point or the edge to make very fine lines.
TJ

Colorix
04-16-2008, 03:27 PM
Yet another way (and I'm sure there are way more!) is to have a clean broken end of a round pastel and applying the edge to the painting and then slowly roll the stick on the edge (stick at an angle) for the desired length of the line. It won't be absolutely perfectly even in thin-ness (I like that, though, it is livelier), but it becomes surprisingly straight.

Was that description of how to do it understandable at all... ?

JWebber
04-16-2008, 03:53 PM
Hello,

I use all of the above answers but if the under layer is dark and the line is a short one I use a colourshaper that has a fine rubber point like a fine paint brush, they can be bought at any art supply store. I just drag that fine point in the line that I want and it takes off the top layer and leaves a fine line of the bottom layer colour. If you vary your pressure you can achieve a less sharp line for lines in the distance. I would use one of the other methods for a very long line however, the colourshaper will collect and so a long line may not be sharp.

Enid Goyers
04-17-2008, 06:41 AM
What about pastel pencils?
Enid

Colorix
04-17-2008, 07:34 AM
Good question, Enid. To me, they are way too hard, so they only move the existing pastel around but don't leave any of its colour on top of what is already there on the paper. Of course, pastel pencils work just fine when I start on fresh paper, and they can be sharpened to a fine point. I found that the pencils I can get here have to be sharpened with a knife, as they break off in sharpeners. I sketch the outlines with them.

Now, I use Rembrandt and Scmincke (medium, and supersoft), so pencils may work on top of the harder pastels.

Enid Goyers
04-17-2008, 11:23 AM
Good question, Enid. To me, they are way too hard, so they only move the existing pastel around but don't leave any of its colour on top of what is already there on the paper. Of course, pastel pencils work just fine when I start on fresh paper, and they can be sharpened to a fine point. I found that the pencils I can get here have to be sharpened with a knife, as they break off in sharpeners. I sketch the outlines with them.

Now, I use Rembrandt and Scmincke (medium, and supersoft), so pencils may work on top of the harder pastels.

Yes, you are right. You have those houses also in Sweden with the little lattice windows (much woodwork). These give me a little nightmare to paint with pastels. If the painting itself is not too big (mine is 24 x 30 cm) you really get frustrated about the little straight lines. Maybe there are certain limits, or?
Thanks anyway for thinking for me!
Have a nice evening.
Enid

chewie
04-17-2008, 01:52 PM
i dont' pile the pigment on so thickly, and don't care for those super -soft brands, so i get along very well with pastel pencils. if its a dark or white line you want, you may have better luck using a charcoal or white charcoal pencil for those tiny lines. i also use a blade to sharpen, then fine-tune the point with a cheapo handheld sharpener, and a sandpaper block.

Enid Goyers
04-18-2008, 06:19 AM
i dont' pile the pigment on so thickly, and don't care for those super -soft brands, so i get along very well with pastel pencils. if its a dark or white line you want, you may have better luck using a charcoal or white charcoal pencil for those tiny lines. i also use a blade to sharpen, then fine-tune the point with a cheapo handheld sharpener, and a sandpaper block.

Hey, that is a good tip, the white charcoal pencil. I didn't even know such pencils would exist. Thanks a lotl
Enid