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Mybubblewall
06-23-2002, 07:44 PM
I discovered this color wheel almost by accident. I dont know if anyone else has found it but I thought it might be helpful.

The wheel is fully interactive, enabling you to adjust saturation, intensity and hue.

http://home.att.net/~rocq/SIHwheel.html

rfranzen
06-24-2002, 04:43 PM
Another excellent colorwheel is at:

http://www.mauigateway.com/~donjusko/tubecolors.htm

It is not interactive, but it was designed by the artist Don Jusko for artists. His site also has an artist tutorial, "Painting on Location". He lives in Hawaii, so he has access to some _really_ nice locations.

paintfool
06-25-2002, 05:17 AM
Although he hasn't posted in some time, Don Jusko is a WetCanvas member.

Reye
08-06-2002, 05:18 PM
Yeah...I have gone to this in the past as well....along with making a BIG color chart....which has helped me.

donjusko
08-26-2004, 04:19 AM
Hi Paintfool, thanks.
Hi Richard, I still have a link to you on my link page, aloha.
Hi Reye, thanks, glad you liked it. I've added more matching colors since 2000, plus this page.
http://www.mauigateway.com/~donjusko/complementsneutral.htm

bagwash
08-27-2004, 12:46 AM
I discovered this color wheel almost by accident. I dont know if anyone else has found it but I thought it might be helpful.

The wheel is fully interactive, enabling you to adjust saturation, intensity and hue.

http://home.att.net/~rocq/SIHwheel.html


Looks interesting, but unfortunately the link isn't working.

Jenny :cool:

donjusko
08-27-2004, 04:24 AM
This address works.
http://r0k.us/graphics/SIHwheel.html
The YMC color wheel works for tints in full chroma pigments but not as they get darker. Like cad red darkening to red oxide.
For that you need the RCW.
http://www.mauigateway.com/~donjusko/rcwpigments.htm

Einion
08-28-2004, 10:03 AM
Jenny, you can use the colour pickers on the PC or Mac, or the palettes in software like Photoshop and PSP to explore a hue in all its various permutations of colour in much the same way. What's interesting about this is that, once you get a handle on what it's showing you, you can find out some interesting things about what hue a given colour is, as opposed to what one thinks it is (like dark yellows looking green, what is and is not a brown, what you'd class as burgundy/wine/maroon etc.). This sort of tool can help develop your eye for colour mixing.

Since Don resurrected this thread take 180 degrees on this wheel and look at the colour at the top of the swatch; compare it to the undercolour of your phthalo blue and you'll see how far from the hue of cyan it is (not to mention the difference in chroma). And it should be immediately apparent that the masstone is about 230 degrees. Now compare magenta (300 degrees on this wheel) with the undercolour on yours if you have one, as you can see it's closer to 320; the masstone moves even further away from the ideal hue. This illustrates clearly the approximate nature of the primaries we're forced to use in pigments.

Einion

bagwash
08-29-2004, 10:50 AM
This address works.
http://r0k.us/graphics/SIHwheel.html
The YMC color wheel works for tints in full chroma pigments but not as they get darker. Like cad red darkening to red oxide.
For that you need the RCW.
http://www.mauigateway.com/~donjusko/rcwpigments.htm

Thanks Don,

Jenny

bagwash
08-29-2004, 11:02 AM
Jenny, you can use the colour pickers on the PC or Mac, or the palettes in software like Photoshop and PSP to explore a hue in all its various permutations of colour in much the same way. What's interesting about this is that, once you get a handle on what it's showing you, you can find out some interesting things about what hue a given colour is, as opposed to what one thinks it is (like dark yellows looking green, what is and is not a brown, what you'd class as burgundy/wine/maroon etc.). This sort of tool can help develop your eye for colour mixing.

Since Don resurrected this thread take 180 degrees on this wheel and look at the colour at the top of the swatch; compare it to the undercolour of your phthalo blue and you'll see how far from the hue of cyan it is (not to mention the difference in chroma). And it should be immediately apparent that the masstone is about 230 degrees. Now compare magenta (300 degrees on this wheel) with the undercolour on yours if you have one, as you can see it's closer to 320; the masstone moves even further away from the ideal hue. This illustrates clearly the approximate nature of the primaries we're forced to use in pigments.

Einion

Thanks Enion, very interesting. I'm trying to digest all the info on the handprint site about color at the moment, and learning about chroma, hue, luminosity, saturation. Tools like the color wheels discussed here and Photoshop etc are a lot of fun and a bit of a revelation to someone like me, whose art school training encompassed none of this kind of instruction.


Jenny :cool:

rfranzen
11-04-2004, 10:39 PM
I gratefully second Jenny's thanks to Don for updating the link. :)

rfranzen
10-21-2010, 04:49 AM
(Rather than start a new thread, I found this one.)
I've made a significant update to my Interactive Color Wheel at:

* http://r0k.us/graphics/SIHwheel.html

It now includes a list of over 1500 color names, and the list is re-sortable by name, hue, or hex. Whenever a color is selected, it will search for the closest named color and identify it. The names are kind of arbitrary, and come from multiple sources. Here's a snippit:

http://r0k.us/graphics/images/colorNameQE.png

I'm hoping to get some critical feedback.

1) overall general impression
2) ease of use
3) applicability for education
4) applicability for digital artists
5) suggestions for improvement

Thanks!

rfranzen
10-25-2010, 09:24 AM
Lots of folks have looked at the thread since I posted a few days ago. I'm not sure whether they were confused by the old link, felt this question was inappropriate here, or just had no interest in giving me any feedback.

Was it a mistake to post to this old thread, with it's out-of-date URL at the top? Or is the question out of place here? I'm thinking it might be better placed in the digital art forum.

Adult Beginner
10-29-2010, 12:45 AM
I thought it was interesting but am not in a position to provide critical feedback about it. I continue to be a beginner in the visual arts.
Good Luck!
John