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Deborah Secor
01-28-2008, 05:52 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Jan-2008/23609-Springtime_Shade.JPG

On 12x18" white Wallis, underpainted with yellow-orange and blue values to establish sunlight and shadows (per Maggie Price's exercise in the Book Painting with Pastels.) You can see earlier stages in this thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=473062). The blues here may be a bit overripe looking. They are bright IRL but not garish.

Your C&Cs are most welcome. Thanks!

Deborah

klord
01-28-2008, 06:22 PM
This is beautiful, Deborah! Great composition, a lot of movement, and really love the color. One little tiny thing... the edge of the water and land on the left side, it seems that the water is lapping upwards towards the land... just a slight horizontal mark should take care or a light sweep of the finger to soften the edge in a horizontal move.

Wonderful piece.

Kim

Deborah Secor
01-28-2008, 06:26 PM
Ah, good catch, Kim. Thanks--I see it now! :D Love having fresh eyes look at my paintings. Glad you like it.

Deborah

Pat Isaac
01-28-2008, 07:02 PM
Lovely, Deborah. The color is so clean and crisp.

Pat

dvantuyl
01-28-2008, 07:14 PM
Deborah, this is very nice. Since I am working so hard right now and thinking about aerial perspective, should the back ground distant trees be as dark a value as the tree trunks. The painting is lovely, but this is a question I would ask myself if it were mine.

jillstefaniwagner
01-28-2008, 07:16 PM
Very "juicy" Deborah! I agree with lightening the background a bit to account for atmosphere but the composition and technique is great...

Deborah Secor
01-28-2008, 07:27 PM
Deborah, this is very nice. Since I am working so hard right now and thinking about aerial perspective, should the back ground distant trees be as dark a value as the tree trunks. The painting is lovely, but this is a question I would ask myself if it were mine.

Trust me, that is the fault of the photograph :o , not the painting. It isn't anywhere as dark as the trees IRL! But it's a good question and I appreciate having you point it out. You can only judge by what you see here, of course!

One thing we always have to keep in mind is that there can be darker values that are farther away in the landscape. The range of pinon and juniper trees standing behind the lyrical lights of the nearer elm/cottonwood grove is part of what is so striking about this place to begin with. It's characteristic of the place, which is a sandy wash (an arroyo) that's mostly medium-light in color and value. The deep shade is tough to capture (and even harder to get to read in a digital photo, obviously, with my limited photographic skills.) I want the shadow to have prominence, but the range of trees has to be realistic, too.

Larger image (http://deborahsecor.blogspot.com/) on my blog. I think you can see the difference in values there a bit better!

Thanks!
Deborah

WC Lee
01-28-2008, 07:35 PM
very nice :) hmm .. I should give this a try and experiment ... I remember reading about it in Maggie Price's book, "Painting with Pastels". hmm come to think of it .. I still haven't tried any of the techniques mentioned in the book :D

Deborah Secor
01-28-2008, 07:41 PM
It's a fairly instructive and challenging exercise, W.C. Give it a try..!

Deborah

Paula Ford
01-28-2008, 08:05 PM
Oh how beautiful!! Those colors are gorgeous!!

Paula

DAK723
01-28-2008, 08:16 PM
Very nice!

Don

EdK
01-28-2008, 08:19 PM
Deborah - Beautiful painting. I love the depth in the shadow portion of the tree. Very inspiring. I like your blog as well. All those beautiful 9x12's on Canson no less. :wink2:

Ed

Shari
01-28-2008, 09:36 PM
Deborah this is beautiful, I love your style of painting. I must try this exercise too. I just found out that Maggie is teaching in my neck of the woods in late summer -- I gotta take that workshop!!

David Patterson
01-28-2008, 09:39 PM
Wonderful painting Deborah. Love the shadows!

Thank you for your kind words in my blogs guestbook Deborah...they were very much appreciated!

David

Gail V
01-28-2008, 09:54 PM
I really love the colors in this painting! What a great feeling it gives! Beautiful!

Kathryn Day
01-28-2008, 11:05 PM
Hi Deborah, I just love the way you paint the NM landscape. Always enjoy viewing your work.

Deborah Secor
01-28-2008, 11:20 PM
Very "juicy" Deborah! I agree with lightening the background a bit to account for atmosphere but the composition and technique is great...Thanks, Jill. I've always enjoyed 'jucy' color! :heart: Take a peek at the larger scan on my blog and you;ll see what I mean about the values of the darks... I think it shows better t here.


Oh how beautiful!! Those colors are gorgeous!!

Paula Thanks Paula--you're the TREE queen! :D


Very nice!

DonThank you, sir!


Deborah - Beautiful painting. I love the depth in the shadow portion of the tree. Very inspiring. I like your blog as well. All those beautiful 9x12's on Canson no less. :wink2:

EdEd, that Canson isn't even textured Mi Tientes, just the drawing paper made by Canson! I had a blast doing those. Oh, and I'm glad you like that shadow, too. :)


Deborah this is beautiful, I love your style of painting. I must try this exercise too. I just found out that Maggie is teaching in my neck of the woods in late summer -- I gotta take that workshop!!Thank you so much, Shari. Oh, do sign up for the workshop. You won't be sorry. :thumbsup:

Wonderful painting Deborah. Love the shadows!


Thank you for your kind words in my blogs guestbook Deborah...they were very much appreciated!

DavidThanks, David. And I meant every word...


I really love the colors in this painting! What a great feeling it gives! Beautiful!Gail, many thanks!


Hi Deborah, I just love the way you paint the NM landscape. Always enjoy viewing your work.Hey, Kathy! Glad to hear from another New Mexican that I'm doing okay... :wink2: Thank you!

Deborah

maw-t
01-29-2008, 01:49 AM
Beautiful.. Crisp and light.. Love it!

binkie
01-29-2008, 02:20 AM
Absolutely gorgeous painting! I love everything about it.

binkie

jackiesimmonds
01-29-2008, 03:56 AM
I agree with what you say about having some dark values in the distance, or even warm colour - sometimes you can get away with it because of the change of scale.

However..............it does tend to detract from the feeling of "air" in the picture, so one needs to bear this in mind.

Deborah...do you by any chance have Photoshop on your computer? I do, even tho I rarely use it, I need lessons.
However, one thing I learned ages back, which is exceptionally useful, is CTRL/L. This brings up a box with a slider, if you move it along ALL THE SHADOWS IN THE PICTURE LIGHTEN AND YOU CAN SEE RIGHT INTO THEM.
I wont go on about it, in case you dont have Photoshop, in which case this is incredibly annoying information..........but if you do, it is BRILLIANT.

Colorix
01-29-2008, 08:16 AM
Hi Deborah, this is a beautiful painting! The tree is absolutely gorgeous, and I luuuuuv the purple shadow of it! The path of the stream is leading us into the painting in a wonderful way, and the whole place is very beautiful. A detail I admire especially is the green stuff beside the stream, to the left mostly, where you define the edges, and let the mass of colour recede.

One thing we always have to keep in mind is that there can be darker values that are farther away in the landscape. The range of pinon and juniper trees ... behind the ... elm/cottonwood grove is .... characteristic of the place, ... ...I want the shadow to have prominence, but the range of trees has to be realistic, too.


Deborah, I also run into this problem fairly often. "The trees behind are darker than the trees in front." Yes, they are pines and firs, and the one in front is a birch, so it is lighter, Duh! And?

As I know you "survive" it, I took the liberty to play with your painting in Paint program. Not having seen the actual place, nor a ref, I just did what seemed "painterly" to me. (And you're way more skilled than I am, so take my alterations with a huge dose of salt.)

I had two objectives: 1) To play! :-), and 2) to show you visually how a person far away and unfamiliar with your landscape would interpret your painting, by making alterations that would fit my idea of how it "ought" to look. I know, it is annoying as... um... a very warmer place. I've learned that I sometimes have to 'fake' it for the *painting* to read right, but that compromises the portrait of the *place*. And I so *know* a photo of a painting is off in many ways, so I'm only going by what's on the screen. So here's my *faking it* with your painting:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Jan-2008/117343-PS_Deborah.jpg

Front to back: Slightly darker shadow sides on the growth up front (ought to be much warmer than I made them), and daker warmer water. Growth midground, slightly lighter shadows, getting bluer and pinker in distance. Slightly paler banks, supposed to (didn't succeed) get pinker and bluer in distance, the first part warmer, and the two next ones cooler. Dark treeline slightly lightened, and more cool pinks, purples, cool greens and blues to indicate light on them. Distant blue hills softened against sky.

Sorry to mangle your painting, but main thing I wanted to show is how treeline can be rather dark, but with a few weak lights on it. And this may well be how your real painting is!

Am rather embarrassed to make changes in one of your paintings, but I think you can 'take it', and as I said, you're way more experienced than I am, so don't take my 'playing' seriously.

And your painting is very beautiful!

Seveer
01-29-2008, 09:38 AM
Beautiful Deborah,
I hope you don't mind if I take a nap under that beautiful shade tree...
Just paint around me....hehe

Dot Hoffman
01-29-2008, 10:39 AM
Deborah, very nice! I especially like the shadows. Great color:thumbsup:

Deborah Secor
01-29-2008, 10:55 AM
Beautiful.. Crisp and light.. Love it!Thank you, T! :D


Absolutely gorgeous painting! I love everything about it.

binkieThanks to you, too, binkie...


I agree with what you say about having some dark values in the distance, or even warm colour - sometimes you can get away with it because of the change of scale.

However..............it does tend to detract from the feeling of "air" in the picture, so one needs to bear this in mind.

Deborah...do you by any chance have Photoshop on your computer? I do, even tho I rarely use it, I need lessons.
However, one thing I learned ages back, which is exceptionally useful, is CTRL/L. This brings up a box with a slider, if you move it along ALL THE SHADOWS IN THE PICTURE LIGHTEN AND YOU CAN SEE RIGHT INTO THEM.
I wont go on about it, in case you dont have Photoshop, in which case this is incredibly annoying information..........but if you do, it is BRILLIANT.Hi Jackie...yes, I know you're right about the scale issue, of course! In the face of everyone's questions surrounding this issue I will assuredly go into the studio and carefully examine this painting. I really don't think it has a problem, but I'll be sure to check it--and thanks! And yes, I do have photoshop and I use the levels slider to see into shadow areas when needed, a trick I first learned from you!! It is a help....


Hi Deborah, this is a beautiful painting! The tree is absolutely gorgeous, and I luuuuuv the purple shadow of it! The path of the stream is leading us into the painting in a wonderful way, and the whole place is very beautiful. A detail I admire especially is the green stuff beside the stream, to the left mostly, where you define the edges, and let the mass of colour recede.

Deborah, I also run into this problem fairly often. "The trees behind are darker than the trees in front." Yes, they are pines and firs, and the one in front is a birch, so it is lighter, Duh! And?

As I know you "survive" it, I took the liberty to play with your painting in Paint program. Not having seen the actual place, nor a ref, I just did what seemed "painterly" to me. (And you're way more skilled than I am, so take my alterations with a huge dose of salt.)

I had two objectives: 1) To play! :-), and 2) to show you visually how a person far away and unfamiliar with your landscape would interpret your painting, by making alterations that would fit my idea of how it "ought" to look. I know, it is annoying as... um... a very warmer place. I've learned that I sometimes have to 'fake' it for the *painting* to read right, but that compromises the portrait of the *place*. And I so *know* a photo of a painting is off in many ways, so I'm only going by what's on the screen. So here's my *faking it* with your painting:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Jan-2008/117343-PS_Deborah.jpg

Front to back: Slightly darker shadow sides on the growth up front (ought to be much warmer than I made them), and daker warmer water. Growth midground, slightly lighter shadows, getting bluer and pinker in distance. Slightly paler banks, supposed to (didn't succeed) get pinker and bluer in distance, the first part warmer, and the two next ones cooler. Dark treeline slightly lightened, and more cool pinks, purples, cool greens and blues to indicate light on them. Distant blue hills softened against sky.

Sorry to mangle your painting, but main thing I wanted to show is how treeline can be rather dark, but with a few weak lights on it. And this may well be how your real painting is!

Am rather embarrassed to make changes in one of your paintings, but I think you can 'take it', and as I said, you're way more experienced than I am, so don't take my 'playing' seriously.

And your painting is very beautiful!Charlie, I'm delighted you had fun seeing my painting as your own. Your experiments with it are interesting to see and a lot of them make sense, especially in light of the idea that there is 'atmosphere' in New Mexico. I don't know if you've visited here or not, but maybe you know how clear and dry it is, and I see that you acknowledge that issue...

As I said to Jackie, since everyone sees this distance issue as such a problem in my painting, I'll take a much closer look at it to see if it needs any of your suggeseted changes. Thank you for taking the time to do this. :wave:


Beautiful Deborah,
I hope you don't mind if I take a nap under that beautiful shade tree...
Just paint around me....heheSorry, Richard. Didn't mean to disturb you. Could you move your left leg? :lol:


Deborah, very nice! I especially like the shadows. Great color:thumbsup:Thanks so much, Dot. I appreciate it!

Deborah

Susan Jenkins
01-29-2008, 11:04 AM
Oh Deborah...

This is just so incredibly beautiful! I'm always so amazed at how I can look at paintings on here that just blow my mind.... and low and behold someone will point out something to critique. I guess it just shows that only God creates perfection. But I must say.... your paintings capture God's beauty in a way that truly inspires me. I see His love in your work. Thank You!!!
:) Susan:clap:

dvantuyl
01-29-2008, 11:25 AM
Deborah, so interesting to think about the atmosphere in different places and how to still make a painting work. Although I live in Washington, the climate here on the dry side is considered desert. The air is crystal clear with little or no humidity in the air. I think this is why I have a problem with aerial perspective; it is hard to "see" in my photo, or on site. To deal with the problem of creating great depth, I have to ignore the photo or study and ask myself "what does the painting need?" And sometimes I need to push back the distance with lighter values, at least that is what I am trying to do. In California where it is also dry they are blessed with pollution, which creates so much atmosphere and distance. When we have wild fires in the summer I get this wonderful haze to work with.

Deborah Secor
01-29-2008, 12:34 PM
Oh Deborah...

This is just so incredibly beautiful! I'm always so amazed at how I can look at paintings on here that just blow my mind.... and low and behold someone will point out something to critique. I guess it just shows that only God creates perfection. But I must say.... your paintings capture God's beauty in a way that truly inspires me. I see His love in your work. Thank You!!!
:) Susan:clap:Thanks Susan, that's very sweet to hear. :heart:


Deborah, so interesting to think about the atmosphere in different places and how to still make a painting work. Although I live in Washington, the climate here on the dry side is considered desert. The air is crystal clear with little or no humidity in the air. I think this is why I have a problem with aerial perspective; it is hard to "see" in my photo, or on site. To deal with the problem of creating great depth, I have to ignore the photo or study and ask myself "what does the painting need?" And sometimes I need to push back the distance with lighter values, at least that is what I am trying to do. In California where it is also dry they are blessed with pollution, which creates so much atmosphere and distance. When we have wild fires in the summer I get this wonderful haze to work with.Donna, I've heard that the dry side of Washington state is exceptional. We do have to 'be there' to understand what is seen before painting it effectively. That's one of the biggest challenges of showing work here on WC, don't you think? :D


Charlie made my NM landscape into a place I've never seen. The fact is that in NM you can literally see the trees dotted along the top of a mesa that's 15 miles away (assuming you have good enough vision, that is!) but what she would do is no less authentic, because it's a painting, not a little piece of reality! I like that she brings her experience to it, and others bring theirs, and either our vision dovetails and my painting pleases them--or not. That's a good part of why it's such a delight when someone stands in front of a painting and lays down her money for it. That's the ultimate indication (in our culture) that she agrees.

I've long since learned that the painting has to achieve the impression of what is seen, of course, and I know that reality is often sacrificed on the altar of perception in order to achieve MORE. I've blued the distant trees to make them breathe and changed scale and color to accomplish the desired perception many times in my nearly 30 years painting the landscape. But I have to note that I'm rarely as pleased with realism such as you see in this painting as I am with a more expressionistic landscape, mostly because people cannot help comparing reality and the painting, and almost inevitably the painting comes up lacking. As Susan pointed out, the perfection we seek is the actual landscape. In realism it's our goal. But when it's a loose, spontaneous, colorful expressive painting of my personal vision, people either respond positively or negatively, not with any comments about what should really be there. We need to hone our skills, but the painting is the goal for me, not painting realism. Hmmm, this is making me think quite differently about this painting... hmmmmmmmmmm...stay tuned!

I think one of the bigger frustrations of showing work here at WC is that the photograph of the painting goes only so far in showing what's there. We all have to cope with that. I used to spend a lot of time taking good pictures to show but I just don't have that kind of time any more. It's part of the reason I'm not showing as much work as I used to. It's frustrating to try to explain what people can't see... I know all of you have the same issues! Oh well, we'll just muddle along sharing what we can, analyzing what we can see in our own work, and still having fun. I really do enjoy bouncing thoughts off everyone here. Thanks!

Deborah

DAK723
01-29-2008, 01:01 PM
Deb,

I think that dark treeline works fine regardless of whether it is accurate in terms of the atmospheric perspective. I think one of the most important aspects of creating art is knowing when and how to bend and break the rules. Even if the arizona atmosphere was not so clear, making those trees darker could very well be a good artistic decision even if not totally atmospherically correct.

As I'm sure you well know, in order to make our artistic statement, sometimes it is necessary to make certain areas darker or lighter, colors more or less intense, things sharper or fuzzier than would be "accurate". For example, if your subject is in the midground, you might have to reduce the contrast and color intensity of things in the foreground even if that is not accurate, because you usually want the areas of highest contrast and color intensity (and sharpness) on the subject. One must always balance accuracy with artistic emphasis. Not easy to do, I might add!

Don

Deborah Secor
01-29-2008, 01:07 PM
I couldn't agree more, Don. Well said! :D

Deborah

Mike_Beeman
01-29-2008, 02:17 PM
Deb...Beautiful piece, I may have missed it in the above replies but is this somplace near you? Mike

AliciaS
01-29-2008, 02:26 PM
Deborah. this is a gorgeous piece..i missed this thread..i like your version of the distant hills,,to me it ties in with the trunk of the tree and really brings the composition together..i think it helps make this a strong colorful painting.i wouldn't change it..you get the feeling of a very dry bright day...we get those in so. california once in a while!

HarvestMoon
01-29-2008, 02:28 PM
oh my... this is just STUNNING..... what I do miss when I forget to look at the ART here....

Deborah Secor
01-29-2008, 03:58 PM
Deb...Beautiful piece, I may have missed it in the above replies but is this somplace near you? MikeHi Mike! Yes, it's a location I've painted many times over, both on location and from photographs. It's in the mountains near where I used to live, a wide spot along North Highway 14 where San Pedro Creek veers toward the road. The cattle on the Campbell Ranch (get this--originally a 500,000 acre ranch, they sold some off so now it's only 300,000-ish), which stretched around behind our house, would mosey down to the edge of the creek to get water and often stand in the shade of this tree in the heat of the day. This is spring, when the trees are just starting to fill out and still have that delicacy I like. Thanks--glad you like it. :)

Deborah. this is a gorgeous piece..i missed this thread..i like your version of the distant hills,,to me it ties in with the trunk of the tree and really brings the composition together..i think it helps make this a strong colorful painting.i wouldn't change it..you get the feeling of a very dry bright day...we get those in so. california once in a while!Thanks, Alicia... I lived in San Diego for several years, but it was a long time ago. I understand about hot and dry, sometimes! (I'll never forget the Santa Anas.) I don't think I'll change this painting too much but now I'm thinking of doing another one! I have an idea. I may not have the time soon, though, so we'll see.

oh my... this is just STUNNING..... what I do miss when I forget to look at the ART here....Yeah, girl, come on over here to look at the art, too! :D Thanks!

Deborah

RooGal
01-29-2008, 05:31 PM
:thumbsup: Stunning Deborah! Reminds me of South Australia, although you'd have to remove the water. I'll have to re-read the comments regarding foreground/background. Something I am still trying to understand, foregrounds darker, backgrounds lighter? I have tried searching for specific threads that discuss that. This must be a general rule of thumb, and I am probably not as observant as I'd like to be.

Love the painting very much!
cheers

Colorix
01-29-2008, 05:56 PM
Hi again, I'd like to clarify, if I may. I sincerely hope no-one took my previous post in this thread to mean that Deborah should change anything in her beautiful painting. The point of my massacre of Deborah's painting was to show that it *indeed* becomes a picture of *somewhere else*, when one makes suggestions based on one's own reality *or* idea of how it "should" be. Deborah's painting is of course an accurate and artistic interpretation of that place, time, and atmospheric conditions. Most important, it is *her* painting. I cannot say it "should" or "ought" to be any other way, as I've not stood there with her. I tried to say that *if* I had been seriously suggesting in blatant ignorance, then the result would have been very different from what she saw at the location.

This is a difficulty when we critique each other's paintings. The "rules" do not apply in the same way all over the world, as multiple factors change what we see.

Deborah, you mention another tricky point, that a photo of a painting doesn't make it justice. Critique always zoom in on the photographic issues, and one ends up saying "yes, it looks that way in the photo, but it really *is* different and better in the painting, truly, please believe me", and that feels a bit ridiculous when one has to repeat it often. Deborah, I do understand that you post less because of it, but I really would like to see many more of your gorgeous paintings. (And I promise not to play with them again, not a single one.)

Deborah Secor
01-29-2008, 06:00 PM
Hi Pam... The general rule is that all colors become cooler in color and lighter in value as they recede from the eye. There are five elements that have to be controlled: color, value, edge, contrast and detail.

I bet in South Australia you can see a scrub tree standing out etched dark against the earth ten miles away! We sure can here in New Mexico. :wink2: But you still have to consider all these elements...

Deborah

bnoonan
01-29-2008, 08:48 PM
Oh Deborah this is yet another stunning piece. I open up your postings and immediately reply.. Wow - how does she do it so consistently?

Superb. My favorite part is the lavender directly under the trees. Also you make your distance hills just glow - they are really harmonious with the greens in the sage lower left and water lower right. Nicely done!

Barb

bnoonan
01-29-2008, 08:52 PM
Deborah, so interesting to think about the atmosphere in different places and how to still make a painting work. Although I live in Washington, the climate here on the dry side is considered desert. The air is crystal clear with little or no humidity in the air. I think this is why I have a problem with aerial perspective; it is hard to "see" in my photo, or on site. To deal with the problem of creating great depth, I have to ignore the photo or study and ask myself "what does the painting need?" And sometimes I need to push back the distance with lighter values, at least that is what I am trying to do. In California where it is also dry they are blessed with pollution, which creates so much atmosphere and distance. When we have wild fires in the summer I get this wonderful haze to work with.


Hi Donna! It's a reminder that there is a dry side of the state. I'm in the wet and gray and dark side these days...do come visit - I'd be happy to share "moist skies".:lol:

PS Loved your work on your web site!!!
Barb

Scottyarthur
01-29-2008, 09:58 PM
Oh my. Wonderful painting, I find I just want to wander around in it and explore. I truly love the colors, so bright with the warmth of the sun yet not hot. I like the use of the light blues in the foreground and the violet shadows.

sonita
01-29-2008, 10:30 PM
great shades!!
Soni

RooGal
01-29-2008, 10:36 PM
Thanks for that Deborah!

jackiesimmonds
01-30-2008, 07:56 AM
I've long since learned that the painting has to achieve the impression of what is seen, of course, and I know that reality is often sacrificed on the altar of perception in order to achieve MORE. I've blued the distant trees to make them breathe and changed scale and color to accomplish the desired perception many times in my nearly 30 years painting the landscape. But I have to note that I'm rarely as pleased with realism such as you see in this painting as I am with a more expressionistic landscape, mostly because people cannot help comparing reality and the painting, and almost inevitably the painting comes up lacking. Deborah

I totally agree with your last sentence. I think that a beautifully painted painting has the ability to IMPROVE upon nature. When we look with the naked eye at "reality" we see every detail, and every nuance of colour and tone. We scan the scene, and as we move our heads and eyes, every part of the scene comes into full focus. When an artist uses his - or in your case - her abilities to adjust nature to suit the purpose of the painting, it can often help to focus the viewer's attention on a particular element of that landscape scene, making him, or her, REALLY appreciate the special beauty that the artist has highlighted or emphasised.

What a wonderful skill this is.

amandanator
01-30-2008, 10:44 AM
Deborah,

Another stunner! How lucky are you to have the New Mexico landscape as a constant subject!

Beautiful

Mandy

Deborah Secor
01-30-2008, 03:32 PM
Oh Deborah this is yet another stunning piece. I open up your postings and immediately reply.. Wow - how does she do it so consistently?

Superb. My favorite part is the lavender directly under the trees. Also you make your distance hills just glow - they are really harmonious with the greens in the sage lower left and water lower right. Nicely done!

BarbThanks, Barb. Didn't we go out and paint in this spot? I thought we did...but maybe we went to the school/community center instead, which was a little closer to home.


Oh my. Wonderful painting, I find I just want to wander around in it and explore. I truly love the colors, so bright with the warmth of the sun yet not hot. I like the use of the light blues in the foreground and the violet shadows.Scott, I appreciate this. Using the blues under the shadow area made things fall right into place for me.

great shades!!
Soni:cool: Thanks, Soni!

Thanks for that Deborah!You're welcome...

I totally agree with your last sentence. I think that a beautifully painted painting has the ability to IMPROVE upon nature. When we look with the naked eye at "reality" we see every detail, and every nuance of colour and tone. We scan the scene, and as we move our heads and eyes, every part of the scene comes into full focus. When an artist uses his - or in your case - her abilities to adjust nature to suit the purpose of the painting, it can often help to focus the viewer's attention on a particular element of that landscape scene, making him, or her, REALLY appreciate the special beauty that the artist has highlighted or emphasised.

What a wonderful skill this is.I couldn't agree with you more, Jackie! A skill with which you and a lot of other people here are also blessed... :D

Deborah,

Another stunner! How lucky are you to have the New Mexico landscape as a constant subject!

Beautiful

MandyYep, I sure do love New Mexico. Painting this one made me a little bit homesick for the mountains, and then we had a snow day yesterday and suddenly I remembered driving up that hill through 16" of snow and sliding down sideways and suddenly I was perfectly happy to be right where I am!

Deborah