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sielograms
01-25-2008, 08:49 PM
At our last pastel society meeting we had someone demonstrate patel on suede matboard. He stated that the suede it is not archival and may be prone to rot over time. To get around this he uses an acrylic paint (thinned with water) over the surface. It still retains the suede texture but the paint acts like a sealant. He has also worked as a framer for many years so I assume he knows what he is talking about. I do like the way pastel goes on the suede but wonder if they will rot away in years to come. What I am thinking is that maybe the actual mat board is considered archival but the suede material on the surface is not. I would appreciate any input anyone has on this subject. Thanks
Sharon

doe
01-26-2008, 09:22 AM
You made me curious so I looked at the specifier provided by Crescent and their Moorman white core suede board description says acid free surface. You probably should look into what each manufacturer claims before you purchase.

PeggyB
01-26-2008, 02:15 PM
You made me curious so I looked at the specifier provided by Crescent and their Moorman white core suede board description says acid free surface. You probably should look into what each manufacturer claims before you purchase.

To further clarify for everyone "acid free" does not mean "archival". Sealing the surface as suggested will provide a barrier to help reduce the speed of deteration, but I don't know how long that protection will last - my guess is beyond the average life span of anyone living today. I believe the back of the board would also have to be sealed - both for protection and to prevent the board from warping - but you'll have to experiment to know the answer. There may be a question of how lightfast the colors are even with acrylic sealer, but again someone more interested in the chemistry of art and art supplies will have a better answer than I do.

Peggy

binkie
01-26-2008, 09:19 PM
Good point!

binkie

sielograms
01-27-2008, 10:27 AM
Thanks all for your insight. Although it would be nice to think that 200 years from now people would be ooooing and ahhhing at my paintings, I doubt that will be the case. However, I would hope that those that purchase my paintings and those paintings that are handed down to family members will not change too much over time. I guess what concerns me is that the painting is on top of what I think is a "raw" material (cloth), and that the pigment may be at risk to fall off or be more affected by the changes in the atmosphere, mostly humidity. I know some of the basics to prevent this form happening such as not to hang the painting on a wall that gets a lot of sun exposure which can create humidity behind the glass. Also, hang paintings on interior walls. Someone told me she tells anyone that buys her work about these simple rules. However, one is not always able to talk to the buyer. I have tried looking this info. up on the internet and I am confused when they say the matboard is archival, I believe that what they're referring to is that when used to mat a painting it is archival. But as a support?? I guess I'll keep searching for the answer. Sharon

PeggyB
01-27-2008, 02:52 PM
Thanks all for your insight. Although it would be nice to think that 200 years from now people would be ooooing and ahhhing at my paintings, I doubt that will be the case. However, I would hope that those that purchase my paintings and those paintings that are handed down to family members will not change too much over time. I guess what concerns me is that the painting is on top of what I think is a "raw" material (cloth), and that the pigment may be at risk to fall off or be more affected by the changes in the atmosphere, mostly humidity. I know some of the basics to prevent this form happening such as not to hang the painting on a wall that gets a lot of sun exposure which can create humidity behind the glass. Also, hang paintings on interior walls. Someone told me she tells anyone that buys her work about these simple rules. However, one is not always able to talk to the buyer. I have tried looking this info. up on the internet and I am confused when they say the matboard is archival, I believe that what they're referring to is that when used to mat a painting it is archival. But as a support?? I guess I'll keep searching for the answer. Sharon

Sharon you are to be commended for being concerned for your clients' purchases longevity. :)

Maybe I can help you a little with the definition of what constitutes "archival" when talking about matboard. For a matboard to be called archival, it must be 100% rag pulp that is pH balanced and therefore also acid free. The rag and balanced acid content is what makes it archival much like high quality watercolor paper or pastel paper. If you aren't worried about let's say Arches watercolor papers or Wallis or Art Spectrum Colourfix papers, you need not worry about archival mat board.

Here too is a suggestion that some artists use to help the new owners of their work care for it properly. Write a paragraph titled "Care and Handling of Pastel Paintings". Some information to include might be:
Where to hang the work (as you mentioned above)
Never store the work or place it with the face down
Don't jar the painting excessively
If you've used conservation glass, let them know how to care for it
Some even include information about reframing if for any reason they may want to do that. Included in that info is the caution about never allowing the painting to be permanently affixed to another surface (such as spray fixed to another board), and if they do you are not responsible for fixing any damage that may occur.)
Perhaps you have other concerns to include in this paragraph. You might consider putting this information in two places. One on the back of the backing board that you use to mount your painting on, and one on the back outside of the framed painting. Over time, the paper backs of framed paintings are often damaged. If the information is also included on the inside there is a better chance that piece will be preserved for posterity.

Hope this helps with some of your concerns.

Peggy