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View Full Version : Value Seperation - The EASY Way


mrking
01-09-2008, 12:39 AM
I just stumbled upon an easy as pie way to sort your pastels by value. However, it does depend on you having a camera with a large screen that can display B&W.

The camera I have is a Kodak EasyShare V1253. (http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=11617&pq-locale=en_US&_requestid=4683)

Set the camera to show black and white. Pick up a pastel and look at it via the screen while figuring out where to place it in its new home. Drop it in. Very interactive.

A couple caveats though.One is that you must wear down the sides a bit if trying to place a NuPastel or Rembrandt as the outside colour is usually darker than the inside.

Second, you will get close placing pastels this way but if you want it perfect pull out the stick your matching it to and do a test on paper as well.

I was on my second day of sorting my box by values and was only half done. I stumbled upon this method and finished the other half within an hour.

Phew!!!

Hope this will help others. :thumbsup::thumbsup:

Colour Version:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2008/108995-100_0983.JPG


B&W Version:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2008/108995-100_0982.JPG


FWIW, I made the box out of foam core to the same dimensions as the Heilman Box Regular. I glued in some non slip drawer lining in the bottom. It is the stuff that has holes in it so the pastels do not sit in their own dust.

Now... to get back to painting.

Donna A
01-09-2008, 01:56 AM
Hi, Michael. That's very striking! Pretty cool! What a great idea! :-) Thank you! And other applications just have to tickle one's fancy! Wonderful! Take good care! Donna ;-}

Donna T
01-09-2008, 07:28 AM
That's a great idea, Michael. I wish I had a camera like that.

Donna T

PeggyB
01-09-2008, 12:34 PM
Very Cool Michael.
Peggy

Leed
01-17-2008, 12:54 PM
I just stumbled upon an easy as pie way to sort your pastels by value. However, it does depend on you having a camera with a large screen that can display B&W.

The camera I have is a Kodak EasyShare V1253. (http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=11617&pq-locale=en_US&_requestid=4683)

Set the camera to show black and white. Pick up a pastel and look at it via the screen while figuring out where to place it in its new home. Drop it in. Very interactive.

A couple caveats though.One is that you must wear down the sides a bit if trying to place a NuPastel or Rembrandt as the outside colour is usually darker than the inside.

Second, you will get close placing pastels this way but if you want it perfect pull out the stick your matching it to and do a test on paper as well.

I was on my second day of sorting my box by values and was only half done. I stumbled upon this method and finished the other half within an hour.

Phew!!!

Hope this will help others. :thumbsup::thumbsup:

Colour Version:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2008/108995-100_0983.JPG


B&W Version:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2008/108995-100_0982.JPG


FWIW, I made the box out of foam core to the same dimensions as the Heilman Box Regular. I glued in some non slip drawer lining in the bottom. It is the stuff that has holes in it so the pastels do not sit in their own dust.

Now... to get back to painting.
:clap: :clap: :smug:

Leed
01-17-2008, 12:59 PM
I think the camera idea is terrific! I have spent days separating values until I wanted to dump the whole box over. I have a Heilmann box which I love but is not large enough for studio extras. I have been keeping them in plastic boxes with w/lids (lined with foam) but can't see all that is there immediately. I am going to make boxes today and keep them out on a long folding table! Thank you.:clap:

Scottyarthur
01-18-2008, 09:45 PM
You can also take each pastels and make a one inch line with it on white paper, take it to a printer and print it out in black and white if you don't have the camera, do this for each pastel on the same paper you can then compare them for value.

Shari
01-19-2008, 12:37 AM
Another good idea is the red plastic that shows values. I have a viewfinder that has windows of red in it for painting outdoors and seeing values, but it works really well with our pastel sticks and our paintings too. I use it to check during a painting to see if the values are right.

mrking
01-19-2008, 01:30 AM
Another good idea is the red plastic that shows values. I have a viewfinder that has windows of red in it for painting outdoors and seeing values, but it works really well with our pastel sticks and our paintings too. I use it to check during a painting to see if the values are right.

Do you know if the red cellophane that you can buy at Michael's that you wrap gift baskets in would work? Or is it a specific red?

Deborah Secor
01-19-2008, 02:19 AM
Different reds work differently, but any red will do--as will any color cellophane, in fact. You could use blue or green, too. We choose red because most people working on landscapes find there is little red to contend with. My caution to you is NOT to rely on the red filter to find value because it won't work for the colors with red in them. The red cellophane makes all the reds look like white! (Same for any color.) You'll never find a portraitist using the red filter, for instance, because skin is far too often red.

I advise you to use your eyes to find the values of your pastel colors first, then check with a grayscale version of the color pic, as Mike did here. Use this to help train your eye to see value so you can soon begin to squint and perceive values in everything!

Deborah

Shari
01-20-2008, 01:21 AM
Thanks for the info Deborah, I have always used the red filter for landscape here in Oregon but I was told it wouldn't work for landscape in the southwest where the land is very red. It works great here where all is green.

Dot Hoffman
01-20-2008, 10:40 AM
My first art teacher, a watercolorist, used blue plexiglass as a filter. I find that it works better than my red filter. Has anyone else tried blue?

Deborah Secor
01-20-2008, 10:41 AM
Yep, Shari, and I actually use one when working here, too, but it really doesn't work for arranging the palette. I had a student come in one day, almost in tears she was so frustrated, with a weird mix of colors all over the box. As we talked I found out she had used the red filter, and then we could clearly see that all her reds, oranges, red-violets and anything influenced too much by red were in the wrong places. The red filter is a great tool for learning value on location and even from photos (though the grayscale shot teaches more, I think), just not for this use...

Deborah