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Britrail
12-29-2007, 06:59 AM
I'm an avid reader of novels about art and artists, and wondered if anyone can come up with any titles or authors I have not read.

I've read most of the well known ones I think like, Girl with a Pearl Earing, Lust for Life, The Burglar who Painted Like Mondrian, Tulip Feather, Ian Pears series of Art Detective novels and many others, but am always looking for new reads, particularly if it is not obvious that they are about art or artists, like John Updike's novel about Jackson Pollock's wife, " Seek My Face" a highly recommended book.

Britrail
12-29-2007, 08:02 AM
Correction 'Tulip Feather' should have read Tulip Fever.

BrianWarner
12-29-2007, 08:11 AM
Try "The Forest Lover" by Susan Vreeland. A novel based on the life of Emily Carr.

NHyde
12-29-2007, 10:19 AM
There was another thread about this recently...here's the link:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=465442

There may be more books to add to your list. :)

ejtupi
12-29-2007, 10:34 AM
Here's a lengthier thread on this topic with lots of novels about artists mentioned. Sorry it's in the Think Tank instead of the Cafe, but really worth taking a look since it's been around for two years.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=306243&

NHyde
12-29-2007, 10:51 AM
A must read: "Still Life with Oysters and Lemon" by Mark Doty. Incredible little book.

Lauren F-M
12-30-2007, 10:05 AM
There was another thread about this recently...here's the link:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=465442

There may be more books to add to your list. :)

That's the thread I started a week or so ago, titled Recommend an Artsy Novel?
Thanks for posting the link!

After finding this list, and learning about the older thread (started Nov. 2005 by'Rodney') titled Know any good Novels to read RE Art in the 'Think Tank' (link also posted -- thanks!), I checked all out, listed all the books mentioned up to this point in a file, and alphabetized it by author. Had to Google some titles that didn't include the author's name. Included info tips where I could.

Now, what to do? :confused:
I could close my thread and that would leave two open ones on books. Note that both fiction and non-fiction have been recommended, so both this thread title and mine aren't totally accurate to what people are suggesting.

Oh, well, the list is great -- so many great books! :D

I'll post the big list here -- might have to do it in a few posts, as it's long. Stay tuned! :D

Lauren :wave:

Lauren F-M
12-30-2007, 10:16 AM
NOVELS & NON-FICTION BOOKS ABOUT ART & ARTISTS:
[as of Dec. 29, 2007]

A
"Cat's Eye" by Margaret Atwood

B
"Degenerate Art: The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany" by Stephanie Barron [non-fiction]
"The Burglar who Painted Like Mondrian" by Lawrence Block
"The Portland Vase: The Extraordinary Odyssey of a Mysterious Roman Treasure" by Robin Brooks

[B]C
"The Horse's Mouth" by Joyce Carey [made into a film w/ Alec Guinness]
"Shamrock Tea" by Ciaran Carson
"The Art Thief" by Noah Charney entitled [fiction - a wonderful mystery, but also informative]
"Lydia Cassatt Reading The Morning Paper" by Harriet Chessman
"Girl with a Pearl Earring" by Tracy Chevalier [novel about the Vermeer painting's creation]
"Lady and the Unicorn" by Tracy Chevalier [about the making of Cluny's tapestries]
"Burning Bright" by Tracy Chevalier [aboout William Blake's London]
"Lives of the Artists" by Robert Clark [story is about 2 American artists who move to Florence & set up a life there. They are joined by another friend, a writer, and they develop relationships with each other and with others. Lots of art observations and ideals. The book is a bit sexual and there are graphic passages]
"The Vacant Chair" by Joe Comber note: couldn't find it online
[I]"Faking It" by Jennifer Crusie [The protagonist struggles over her identity as an artist due to coming from a long line of forgers]

D
"Strapless" by Daborah Davis [about Madame X and John Singer Sargent]
"The Secret Life of Salvador Dali" by Salvador Dali [most of it isn't true, but it's great because it's written by Dali himself]
"The Woman Who Painted Her Dreams" by Isla Dewar, Review, 2002
ISBN: 0-7472-61-6158-X [author is Scottish and the book takes place in Scotland; about a girl, born in the late 1950's, how she grows up in a rather unusual home situation and becomes a famous painter; fiction]
"The Rescue Artist" by Edward Dolnick [non-fiction; Scotland Yard's specialist in art theft, Charlie Hill, could have stepped right out of a detective novel]
"Still Life with Oysters and Lemon" by Mark Doty
"The Genius" by Theodore Dreiser
"The Birth of Venus" by Sarah Dunant

E
"Pictures & Tears" by James Elkins [non-fiction; wonderful in-depth art book about the effects images have on people]
"The Prince of Montparnasse" by Richard Erickson [biography of Bulgarian painter, Jules Pascin (1885-1930)]

Lauren F-M
12-30-2007, 10:23 AM
NOVELS & NON-FICTION BOOKS ABOUT ART & ARTISTS: -- continued
[as of Dec. 29, 2007]

F
"Color: A natural history of the Palette" by Victoria Finlays [story of Victoria Finlay's quest to uncover the many secrets hidden inside the paintbox. On her travels she visited remote Central American villages where women still wear skirts dyed with the purple tears of sea snails; learned how George Washington obsessed about his green]
"Gould's Book of Fish" by Richard Flanagan

G
"The Fleece of Gold" & "Omphale: A Rococo Story" by Theophile Gautier "Mme. Maupin" [/I]... both tales listed here - the main character becomes so enamored of a woman he has seen in a work of art that he can no longer discern between art and reality]
"The Yellow House" by Martin Gayford [about Van Gogh & Gauguin]
"Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" by Malcolm Gladwell [Non-fiction, fascinating - relates to design and artistic choices]
"Violet Clay" by Gail Goodwin [about a woman facing her own problems & discovering her muse]
"Hitler and the Artists" by Henry Grosshans [non-fiction]

[B]H
"The Lost Painting: The Quest for a Caravaggio Masterpiece" by Jonathan Harr
"The Irish Game" by Matthew Hart [Non-fiction; about the theft (twice) of a Vermeer from an Irish home, the first time recovered by an Irish cop and the second time, by his son, also a cop. Great story and you learn a lot about how paintings are used as collateral for drug deals and how Vermeer obtained the amazing perspective in his works]
"The Painted Kiss" by Elizabeth Hickey [about Gustav Klimt, but more from the perspective of Emily]
"Making the Mummies Dance: Inside The Metropolitan Museum Of Art" by Thomas Hoving [non-fiction; author was director of Manhattan's Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1967 to 1977]
"Mysteries of the Rectangle: Essays on Painting" by Siri Hustvedt [non-fiction; the chapter on Vermeer will absolutely blow your mind]

I / J
"Painting In The Dark" by Russell James [An absolutely brilliant thriller: challenging, informative - this is not history as you think you know it - and, well, dark. One of the best books I have ever read in my life - but not for the faint-hearted]

K
"The Fake's Progress" The Story of a master Faker, by Tom Keating [art forger]
"The Judgement of Paris" by Ross King [about the Impressionists who defied the Salon and deviated from the usual standards of what defined aesthetics. It's amazing how intertwined the lives of artists are so intertwined, especially Meissonier and Manet. Or Manet's initial dislike of Monet because of his "audacity" of having a similar name]
"Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling" by Ross King [non-fiction]
"The Light That Failed" by Rudyard Kipling

L
"The way to Paradise" by Mario Vargas LLosa

M
"The Moon and Sixpence" by W. Somerset Maugham [based on the life of Gaugin]
"Chasing Cezanne" by Peter Mayle [a romp of a mystery]
"Quattrocento" by James Mckean
"Narcissus Ascending: A Novel" by Karen McKinnon
"A Man and His Mountain: The Life of Paul Cézanne" by Hugh McLeave
"Tulip Fever" by Deborah Moddach [set in Amsterdam in 1630's]

.... continued....

Lauren F-M
12-30-2007, 10:33 AM
NOVELS & NON-FICTION BOOKS ABOUT ART & ARTISTS: -- continued
[as of Dec. 29, 2007]

N
"Jackson Pollock: An American Saga", by Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith
"Portrait of Jennie" by Robert Nathan [Great love story, very short book, made into a movie in the late 40's]

[B]O / P
"My Name is Red" by Orhan Pamuk [Turkish writer who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 2006/ story takes place among a community of illuminators and miniaturists. Gorgeous]
"Caravaggio" by Christopher Peachment / Parchment?
Iain Pears -- art history mysteries:
"Death by Restoration", "The Raphael Affair", "The Titian Committee", and "The Last Judgement" [knowledge of art and the business of buying and selling seems well researched. The main characters are members of an Italian art theft investigation squad]
"The Portrait" by Iain Pears
"Art as Politics in the Third Reich" by Jonathan Petropoulos [non-fiction]
"The Girl with the Gallery" by Lindsay Pollock [an extremely interesting biography about Edith Gregor Halpert - an influential gallery owner in New York]
"My Name is Asher Lev" & "The Gift of Asher Lev" by Chaim Potok [highly rocommended; esp. the first book]

Q / R
"The Golden Key" written by Melanie Rawn, Jennifer Roberson & Kate Elliott [nice, thick, juicy novel where art/magic/science are blurred and Art controls individual lives and even re-writes history]
Irish Trilogy series, by Nora Roberts: "Born in Fire","Born In Ice", "Born In Shame" [one of these books goes into detail about a woman artist who makes her own glass pieces/very interesting /about the technical details of glass blowing, how the glass is colored, shaped, etc.]
"M" by Peter Robb
"As Above, So Below: A Novel of Peter Bruegel" by Rudy Rucker

[B]S
"The portrait of Dr. Gachet" by Cynthia Saltzman [about the history of the Van Gogh painting]
"Rembrandt's Eyes" by Simon Schama
"Power Of Art" by Simon Schama [non-fiction - True stories of the lives of various artists]
"The Painting" by Nina Schuyler
Daniel Silva [well-crafted suspense novels featuring Gabriel Allon, one of the world's best art restorers, who also happens to be an Israeli spy/assassin, are fun and include a surprising amount of solid info about art restoration itself] Gabriel Allon Series:
"The Kill Artist" (2000), "The English Assassin" (2002), "The Confessor" (2003), "A Death in Vienna" (2004), "Prince of Fire" (2005), "The Messenger" (2006), "The Secret Servant" (2007)
Edward Sklepowich [writes a series of mystery novels, set in Venice, many of which have to do with art -- Urbino McIntyre Venetian Mystery Series] "Death in a Serene City" (1990), "Farewell to the Flesh" (1991), "Liquid Desires" (1993),"Black Bridge" (1995), "Death in the Palazzo" (1997), "Deadly to the Sight" (2002), "The Last Gondola" (2003), "Frail Barrier" (2007)
"The Agony and the Ecstasy" by Irving Stone [Michelangelo]
"Lust for Life" by Irving Stone [novel about Vincent Van Gogh]
"Depths of Glory" by Irving Stone [about the life of Camille Pissarro]

.... continued...

Lauren F-M
12-30-2007, 10:39 AM
NOVELS & NON-FICTION BOOKS ABOUT ART & ARTISTS: -- continued
[as of Dec. 29, 2007]

T
'Turn' by Ann Truit [one of three art-journals]

U
"Seek My Face" by John Updike [novel about Jackson Pollock's wife]

V
"Recollections of a Picture Dealer" by Ambroise Vallard
"The Life and Times of Rembrandt" by Van Loon
"The Forest Lover" by Susan Vreeland [fictional -- life of Canadian painter, Emily Carr]
"Girl in Hyacinth Blue" by Susan Vreeland [follows the various owners of a Vermeer painting - fiction]
"Life Studies" by Susan Vreeland [A collection of short stories, about half of them on impressionists]
"Luncheon of the Boating Party" by Susan Vreeland
"The Passion on Artemisia" by Susan Vreeland [about Artemisia Gentileschi, the first women accepted into the Academie del Art in Florence]

W
"The Feud That Sparked the Renaissance: How Brunelleschi and Ghiberti Changed the Art World" by Paul Robert Walker
"The Medici Conspiracy: The Illicit Journey of Looted Antiquities - From Italy's Tomb Raiders to the World's Greatest Museums" by Peter Watson [about the pillaging and thieving of art in Italy, not the heavy influence of the Medici family as patrons]
"Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder" by Lawrence Weschler
"I was Vermeer" by Frank Wynne

X / Y / Z
"The Masterpiece" by Emile Zola

Lauren :wave:

JeffG
12-30-2007, 12:44 PM
"Bluebeard" by Kurt Vonnegut
(summary of it is on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluebeard_(novel)

stlukesguild
12-30-2007, 12:53 PM
Lauren's list is fairy extensive. Out of it the books that are perhaps the most worthwhile would include:

"The Genius" by Theodore Dreiser
"The Fleece of Gold" & "Omphale: A Rococo Story" by Theophile Gautier (as noted, Gautier is indeed a brilliant writer... in the vein of E.A. Poe... but with a European sensuality. Baudelaire dedicated his poetic masterpiece, Les Fleurs du Mal to Gautier
"The Light That Failed" by Rudyard Kipling
"My Name is Asher Lev" by Chaim Potok
"The Masterpiece" by Emile Zola- A story of a fictional failed artist loosely based upon Zola's childhood friend, Cezanne

If you are interested in books that lean more toward non-fiction you might also check out:

"Brunelleschi's Dome"- Ross King This book explores the creation of the famous duomo in Florence and the innovative genius of its creator in a marvelous narrative manner.
"The Lives of the Artists"- Giorgio Vasari The father of all art historians, Vasari gives a near-contemporary view to the works and lives of the great Renaissance masters. Although the work is now no longer taken as literal fact, it is laden with brilliant narratives, observations, and opinions.

ejtupi
12-30-2007, 01:02 PM
Might be nice if this could be a "sticky" thread in one of the forums. Getting to be quite a few "stickies", I know, but this is a really cool thread.

Thanks for the great effort on the list, Lauren!

Lauren F-M
12-30-2007, 08:19 PM
Well, I'm still updating that list, as new things get posted. :D
Lots of new books to request at my library -- perhaps in audio version. I like to listen to books on tape when working in the studio, and have discovered quite a few good authors by just borrowing audio-books that look interesting. These days I can even request them online via the Library website! :clap:

Now, some more books come to mind.
Vreeland's novel based on the Canadian painter, Emily Carr brings to my mind Carr's own writing. She was a prolific writer and journal-writer, and lots of these have been published. "Klee Wyck", "The Book of Small" and "Hundreds and Thousands" are a few I can recall. I'll look them all up and post them here later. She is a very entertaining writer. Emily Carr lived 1871-1945 -- very innovative and passionate. Very popular here in Canada and I saw a wonderful big retrospective of her work here in Ottawa at the National Gallery of Canada a few years ago.

:confused: Mystery of a Mystery... :confused:
Also, darned if I can't remember the title and the author of a good little art-related mystery I read in the summer -- something I picked up second-hand. Might have it packed away in a box for a garage sale in the spring... :rolleyes:
At first, I thought it was one of the books mentioned and listed here ("Faking It" by Jennifer Crusie). However, when I checked out that book on the author's website, I realized it was not the same book. In case someone else knows this book, I'll recall what I can: mystery/ female protagonist whose grandfather (I think that was the relationship) was an Italian art forger who had passed on his skills to her, but she doesn't want to follow in the family biz, though her family's past does tend to 'haunt' her. She is an art restorer, and worked for an art museum, and was "let go" through a corrupt collegue framing her. I think it takes place in San Francisco (or LA); perhaps she also does Trompe d'Oeil too..... Anyway, in this book she is trying to solve the murder of another art restorer or curator who is found dead with a painting missing in the museum, just after she visited him -- framing her again. Lots of misadventure & action in this one. A good fun read -- but what is the book?? :confused: It might even be one in a series; if so, I'd like to read more of them.

Cheers, Lauren :wave:

Roady
12-31-2007, 11:43 AM
Awesome Book ---> "The Moon and Sixpence" by W. Somerset Maugham [based on the life of Gaugin]

sbarre
12-31-2007, 12:55 PM
Biographies are sometimes a good read -- sometimes not. They're probably too numerous to add to your list. I like them because they often give a good deal of insight into an artist's motivation.

There are also writings by the artists. "The Collective Writings of Robert Motherwell" and "The Artist's Reality" (?) by Mark Rothko come to mind.

Steve

boomerbeach
12-31-2007, 02:48 PM
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF W/C & AVID READERS --

About a year ago, I made a note on my PDA to read two books about painting and haven't gotten around to do so. I believe they were noted as reviewed by L.A. Times, however, not found at libraries and/or bookstores. Anybody read 'em?:
"Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter" - Author not noted, perhaps, an Argentine
"Eye of the Storm" by Chris Andrews, a landscape painter novel. (Lotsa books with same title!_
boomerbeach in SoCal

Violetta
12-31-2007, 03:08 PM
This is a most valuable resource. I really enjoy reading books especially fiction about art and artists, and now I have a huge list all in one place. Thank you to all who have contributed here, especially Rodney and Lauren.

If I can think of any not listed here, I'll be sure to post them.

Lauren F-M
12-31-2007, 07:41 PM
Thanks, Judythe! :D
Great to see all the books being recommended here. All I need is the time to read them all! :rolleyes:

Meanwhile, it occurred to me to mention two novels by one of Canada's prominent authors, Jane Urquhart, who also happens to be married to a well-known Canadian painter, Tony Urquhart (perhaps that's why at least two of her novels have artists in them). I have both these novels, but haven't had a chance to read them, so will recommend them by what is written on the back.

First, is "The Underpainter" (1997, McClelland & Stewart, Inc.), which won Canada's 'Governor General's Award for Fiction.' The back says: "...a novel of interwoven lives in which the world of art collides with the realm of human emotion. It is the story of Austin Fraser, an American painter now in his later years, who is haunted by memories of those whose lives most deeply touched his own, including a young Canadian soldier and china painter and the beautiful model who becomes Austin's mistress. Spanning decades, the setting moves from upstate New York to the northern shores of two Great Lakes; from France in World War One to New York City in the '20s and '30s..."

Jane Urquart also wrote "The Stone Carvers" (2001, McClelland & Stewart). This story covers a large period of time, from the late nineteenth century to after World War One, and the building of the war memorial at Vimy, France.

If anyone has read either of these books, please let us know what you thought of them.:thumbsup:

Cheers!
Lauren:wave:

Happy 2008!! :clap: :lol: :clap:

trafford
01-05-2008, 06:43 AM
To Lauren F-M. I think your author is Hailey Lind. Her art-restorer seems to fit the bill. I found three books by Lind "Brush With Death, "Shooting Gallery" and "Feint of Art". They look good. I'll see if my library has them.

KathleenV
01-05-2008, 11:56 AM
Is this on another thread, too? I thought I replied. There is a Spanish writer I love, Arturo Perez-Reverte. He writes literary thrillers but many of them have an art theme. I am particularly fond of The Nautical Chart and The Flanders Panel. I also loved Jim Ed Bradley's Restoration which is about a WPA muralist in New Orleans.

The novel I am working on now is about a sculptor --- I hope it will be out next year and then I have a third novel planned which is going to have the Rocky Neck/Gloucester Art Colony as the setting. Many great artists lived and painted here including Maxfield Parrish, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, John Singer Sargeant and Mark Rothko so I figure as long as I live here and know people who remember some of them I should take advantage of it!

Lauren F-M
01-05-2008, 06:12 PM
To Lauren F-M. I think your author is Hailey Lind. Her art-restorer seems to fit the bill. I found three books by Lind "Brush With Death, "Shooting Gallery" and "Feint of Art". They look good. I'll see if my library has them.

YES!!!! :clap:

That is the author -- I remember the title of the book I read was "Feint of Art."
Thanks SO much! :thumbsup:
Now I can see if my local library has some of the other books. :D

Cheers, Lauren :wave:

Lauren F-M
01-05-2008, 06:17 PM
Is this on another thread, too? I thought I replied. There is a Spanish writer I love, Arturo Perez-Reverte. He writes literary thrillers but many of them have an art theme. I am particularly fond of The Nautical Chart and The Flanders Panel. I also loved Jim Ed Bradley's Restoration which is about a WPA muralist in New Orleans.

The novel I am working on now is about a sculptor --- I hope it will be out next year and then I have a third novel planned which is going to have the Rocky Neck/Gloucester Art Colony as the setting. Many great artists lived and painted here including Maxfield Parrish, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, John Singer Sargeant and Mark Rothko so I figure as long as I live here and know people who remember some of them I should take advantage of it!

Kathleen --
Thanks for posting about those books -- they sound really interesting! :D

... So you are a writer, too!? :confused:
I gather that you already have one book published -- can you tell us about it?
I spent time in th Gloucester/ Rockport area as a teen. I love it there and would love to go back and see it again. Your books set there sound fascinating. Looking forward to hearing more about them. :thumbsup: Please don't be shy about them!

Cheers, Lauren :wave:

M.A.
01-05-2008, 07:07 PM
Try "The Forest Lover" by Susan Vreeland. A novel based on the life of Emily Carr.

I read that last fall, enjoyed it very much. I also understand that Vreeland's "Girl in Hyacinth Blue" is even better, so hopefully, I'll be picking it up as well sometime. :)

KathleenV
01-05-2008, 09:07 PM
Thank you, Lauren. I'm glad you are familiar with Gloucester. I've been here for 15 years and just love it. I have a degree in art and have been a professional graphic artist for over 20 years and I do a lot of digital collage for my clients but a few years ago I started writing and that has become the new passion in my life.

I published a little book of short stories, My Last Romance and other passions (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0978594053/ref=cm_arms_pdp_dp), 2 years ago. It is available on Amazon. Then this past summer I published a novel The Old Mermaid's Tale (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0978594061/ref=cm_arms_pdp_dp) which is set against a backdrop of the msritime history of the Great Lakes. It is about a young woman who is interested in folklore who falls in love with a musician who lost his leg when he was in a shipwreck. It is also available through Amazon and you can read the first chapter here (http://www.valentine-design.com/Valentine/stories.htm#mermaid).

My current WIP is a novel titled Each Angel Burns (title taken from Rilke's Duino Elegies) about three people in their mid-fifties all at crossroads in their lives. Gabe is an unhappily married cabinet-maker who still regrets leaving art school many years ago. His best friend, Peter, is a Jesuit priest who teaches classical language at Boston College and Maggie is a sculptor who is in the process of getting a divorce from her very rich, very horrible husband. She has purchased an old convent to convert into a sculpture studio and hires Gabe to do the wood work. Gabe is unaware of the fact that she and Pete were once in love and she rejected him for her husband. Also, there is a magnificent statue of the Angel Gabriel by Giovanni Dupre that has disappeared from the abbey --- lots of mystery and intrigue. Now I just have to get it finished.

I thought of another terrific little book if you can find it. It is Pasquale's Angel by Paul McAuley. This is the description from Amazon:
a vividly imagined, historically meticulous murder mystery set during the Renaissance. Just before an auspicious papal visit to Florence, a fierce argument breaks out between a local apprentice to Leonardo da Vinci and an assistant of the notorious Florentine painter, Raphael. When the assistant is found murdered in a locked tower, famed essayist Niccolo{•}Machiavegli [sic] accompanies Pasquale, a novice artisan, on the detective trail. As suspects proliferate, including, among others, the great Michelangelo and Raphael himself, Machiavegli and Pasquale uncover Florence's darker secrets. McAuley makes excellent use of period scenery, celebrities, and art history to create an absorbing suspense vehicle.

Two other very enjoyable books I'd reccommend are The Passion Dream Book by Whitney Otto (Amazon: "opens with the story of Guilietta Marcel, a young Florentine girl who spies on the artist Michelangelo while he sculpts the "David" in his studio and aspires herself to create art. Then we jump to the 20th century, where Romy March, a descendant of Guilietta, faces a related collection of difficult choices in the quest to become an artist herself.") And Light: With Monet at Giverny: A Novel by Eva Figes which is absolutely gorgeous.

I'm sure I'll think of more.... Oh! John Updikes two books on art criticism --- Just Looking and Still Looking

That should do it for now. :)

Lauren F-M
01-16-2008, 10:06 PM
Kathleen -- thanks for that very informative post! More books for the list, and I will check your books out! :D

Meanwhile, I figure that I should mention the book I'm currently listening to (unabridged audio-version) -- another one by Canada's Jane Urquhart, called "Map of Glass" -- the main characters are a woman who I think is autistic, and a young artist -- kind of a conceptual artist -- whose lives get intertwined when he finds the body of her former lover, and a year or so later, she seeks him out so she can deal with her lover's death. The story gets rather complicated, and we end up learning a lot about the (fictional) family history of the lover's ancestors, who settled and lived in the Thousand Islands area -- where the St. Lawrence River meets Lake Ontario, shipbuilding, etc. Jane Urquart is a great writer. I think that later in this story, we learn more about the artist's past.

Cheers, Lauren :wave: