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LROMEL
12-13-2007, 08:10 PM
Hi
Does anyone know if there are any special techniques
for rendering metallic surfaces?


Im talking about fairly difficult surfaces such as liquid titainium or rusted aluminum

Also I'm very familiar with pen and ink so I have a solid understanding of
all the basic techniques, so please have this in mind before replying

If anyone has heard of Hajime Sorayama or Michael Hussar
their works are what I have in mind as far as the level of realism
I'd like to acheive
neither or them use ink so I was curious of its even possible to imitate
that sort of rendering in pen

MonicaB
12-13-2007, 08:17 PM
Hi and welcome! :wave: I certainly think it's possible -- just keep your lights light, your darks dark, and your textures accurate to the metal you're drawing. Try taking one of their images and turning it into black and white -- I bet you'll see some rapid value transitions.

LROMEL
12-13-2007, 08:25 PM
thanks for replying
but i was wondering if there were any specific techniques to use
such as a certain way of hatching
or whether i approach it with a different type of shading
ex:stippling
So say i wanted to render a highly polished chain link
would hatching still be effective?
should i try smudging instead?
is a certain type of pen more effective than another
would i havev more success using a dip pen or something more like a micron?

objectivistartist
12-13-2007, 08:59 PM
Are ye speaking in terms of color or b/w - if the latter, just greyscale their works and copy, using fine micron, stippling as needed.... if color, then consider as prints, which are inks, and do same...

as for what pen, dip crowquill might do ok - depending on how finely rendered ye wanting the work [and how large it is to be].. otherwise Copics and Microns do fine - a lot depends on pe rsonal aptitude on these, as not all love working with nibs, or others with microns, for instance...

LROMEL
12-13-2007, 10:13 PM
Im talking about rendering techniques for still life

Im not trying to specifically copy those artists I had mentioned.
The whole reason I had listed them was so you would be able to get an idea of how much detail I was aiming for.

Please make sure you read my first post clearly before replying ;)

eef
12-14-2007, 06:02 AM
I've done a few drawings with highly polished chrome. I use hatching. My aim is for realism.....see what you think. I don't think your ever going to get a highly polished look as you would with an airbrush or digital images.

Sorry if this is not what you were looking for ;) Post some of your work, so we can get an idea of what you do and are looking for!

Phttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-20878_365084.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-wetcanvas.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-American_Eagle.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom3.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom4.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom2.jpg

MonicaB
12-14-2007, 10:07 AM
Im talking about rendering techniques for still life

Im not trying to specifically copy those artists I had mentioned.
The whole reason I had listed them was so you would be able to get an idea of how much detail I was aiming for.

Please make sure you read my first post clearly before replying ;)

Or you could be a little more specific yourself. Asking for techniques covers a lot of ground.

JanetteBC
12-21-2007, 06:35 AM
I've done a few drawings with highly polished chrome. I use hatching. My aim is for realism.....see what you think. I don't think your ever going to get a highly polished look as you would with an airbrush or digital images.

Sorry if this is not what you were looking for ;) Post some of your work, so we can get an idea of what you do and are looking for!

Phttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-20878_365084.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-wetcanvas.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-American_Eagle.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom3.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom4.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2007/78909-zoom2.jpg

These are perfect examples of what I had in mind to say. In drawing metals the way light hits the metal, or does not hit it, is key. If you are drawing from a photo then a good light source will be effective. If you try to draw from real life the light source has to maintain the same reflection throughout the process. There is a fantasy artist who does a lot of metal, studying his work even though you are using ink will help. I will try to find a link for you. Janette

PVHooper
12-21-2007, 07:25 AM
Yes Fordy is the one to ask, I would look at it as very sharp contrasts with little blending between sections, just draw the different tones and tonal shapes. Well that is my two cents worth.