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Old Tex
08-01-2007, 11:37 PM
Reference is a shot I took on I35 on the way back from Austin Sunday. (Yep, another one taken at around 70mph.) This is a tad darker than the original. As always, C&C welcome.

Gouache 8x10
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Aug-2007/100938-On_I35_Austin_to_Dallas_1.jpg

dbclemons
08-02-2007, 08:31 AM
It's permitted for people to pull over on the side of the road, you know Ralph. No need to be in that big of a hurry. Might be easier to focus, too. ;) Glad we finally got some clear weather for ya'.

Old Tex
08-02-2007, 09:07 AM
It's permitted for people to pull over on the side of the road, you know Ralph. No need to be in that big of a hurry. Might be easier to focus, too. ;) Glad we finally got some clear weather for ya'.

Hey David, I know, but when we're headed for home, it's like horses headed for the barn. Did get a few usable shots, though, even at speed. Our daughter and son-in-law took us down to Town Lake Saturday afternoon, so I could take some pictures, and we got caught in a shower walking along one of the jogging trails. It was a good, if quick, trip.

meglyman
08-02-2007, 06:31 PM
Oooo, I really like this one, Ralph! The shapes of the clouds mimicking the shapes of the trees is neat. The range of colors is beautiful - the orange bottom / blue top being complimentary really anchors the piece.

I gotta start taking 70 mph photos. :D

Meg

Old Tex
08-02-2007, 08:57 PM
With a driver, Meg, with a driver! Very important!

William Wray, on the Landscape Forum, has been pushing me to get more color into my landscapes. I won't know for sure until I do a few more, but this might be the breakthrough painting I needed to do. I'm glad you like it.

We're headed to Wichita, Kansas and back this weekend, so hopefully, I'll get more photos to work from. I'm beginning to get a pretty good collection so I can better pick and choose my subjects from a good variety.

Paulafv
08-03-2007, 08:59 AM
Love the sky, especially. You paint gouache with a look of oils.

Old Tex
08-03-2007, 11:24 AM
Thank you, Paulafv! When I started, that was my intent, so I guess I'm on the right track. As it progresses, we'll see where it goes. I really appreciate the observation.

Seleeni
08-03-2007, 08:34 PM
It's beautiful, Ralph. I really like the brushstrokes. How do you get those darkest darks? Is it in layers or gouache straight out of the tube? I'm trying to figure that out with my current dog painting. My darks look so much like transparent watercolor, well, 'cause that's what it is. I don't know how to get the more stroky look of gouache when it isn't mixed with white.

Selene

meglyman
08-04-2007, 12:58 PM
Driver. Right. ;)

Selene, I've had luck getting very dark colors by using very little (or no) water. Gotta work quick though, because it dries faster.

Old Tex
08-06-2007, 09:01 AM
Thank you, Selene. I started with a very dark wash of the trees only, using alizarin crimson and prussian blue. It was virtually black. Then I worked over that with my greens along with burnt sienna. Strictly trial and error on this one.

maggie latham
08-10-2007, 09:06 PM
Ralph,
This is beautiful! Not only does it have the feel of an oil painting, but also the feel of a pastel painting. This is how I would like to paint my landscapes in pastel (if only they would come out that way)! Odd really, you’re painting in gouache wanting the painting to have the feel of an oil, and I’m painting in pastel using acrylic medium and varnish to have the same feel as an oil! I know you would be great at landscapes in pastel. …Just think….no mixing of paints and no brush!
Did you use Kamar on this one?

Old Tex
08-11-2007, 12:11 AM
Ralph,
This is beautiful! Not only does it have the feel of an oil painting, but also the feel of a pastel painting. This is how I would like to paint my landscapes in pastel (if only they would come out that way)! Odd really, you’re painting in gouache wanting the painting to have the feel of an oil, and I’m painting in pastel using acrylic medium and varnish to have the same feel as an oil! I know you would be great at landscapes in pastel. …Just think….no mixing of paints and no brush!
Did you use Kamar on this one?

Hi Maggie,
Thank you very much! I think this one comes closest so far to what I want to do. Unfortunately, remembering what you did is the hard part. (At least it is for me. I'm not good about keeping notes.) The one after this didn't come close. Actually, in much younger days, I did what we called "chalk talks" at church. Did a rough piece (more of a drawing than a painting) with pastels while delivering a little inspirational talk. It was kind of neat, and people seemed to enjoy it, but the dust really showed up on dark suits!

I can't switch back and forth between mediums very easily and still maintain my drive. And right now, I am driven to get good at these gouache landscapes. I'm on a mission. As long as I have that drive, I've got to stay focused on it. I do appreciate the vote of confidence, though.

No, this isn't varnished yet. I am waaayy behind on that. I've got about 8 pieces right now that need to be signed and varnished.

By the way, I really do like those two experimental pieces you posted over in Landscape. I think you're really on to something there. That's a dynamite technique!

russell44
08-16-2007, 05:46 PM
Dear Ralph,

I want to understand, your desire to pait Gouache to look like oils. If you like water base, then do your underpainting in casein and overpaint in oil. With true egg tempera, you paint with that medium to get the wonderful sheen. So can be true of gouache which you will not get with oil unless you masterfully work on a new varnishing system.

You said you were going on a trip to the Midwest, why not do some outdoor painting with gouache to instantly record the color temperature, hue, chroma and values. Yes, take a few pics, but put notes on that field painting and it will ensure you to not copy a pic and have it myopic.

Just a Thought.
Chuck in Houston

Old Tex
08-26-2007, 01:06 PM
Wow, Chuck, I'm not sure how to respond. Your credentials certainly call for me to pay attention to your observations. There are two factors at play here... first, since I work in a limited space that has to be converted on short notice to sleeping quarters for grandchildren, I've ruled oils out as a preferred medium. Second, I just plain enjoy working with gouache. And, although I could never aspire to his level or success, I figure I'm in good company, since it appears virtually all of Gordon Snidow's work is gouache.

I think the "look of oils" is more of a byproduct that has emerged as I've continued to paint. I started out trying to paint like an oil painter, but am slowly finding I can use a combination of wash and opaque that seems to be working. I'm also pretty impatient. I truly admire those who work in egg tempera, but it seems far too slow a process for me at this stage of my life. And, right or wrong, I just simply don't want to spend my limited painting time preparing surfaces. I want to sit down and paint. I enjoy the experiment of getting things to happen when I put wet paint over dry in gouache. And I'm working on the varnish aspect.

I did intend to do some outdour painting on the Ohio trip, but it was a big disappointment. Much of my time was spent watching it rain, or doing some projects around my mother-in-law's house. Fortunately, I did get a lot of photos on the trip.

I'm not sure what you mean by myopic. I do intend to try to get outdoors more, but at the same time, I'm slowly learning to use photos as a starting point or inspiration, rather than copying them.

With your background, I really appreciate you taking the time to look and comment. I know it comes from years of experience and observation.

Thanks!

Seleeni
08-26-2007, 09:47 PM
Hi Ralph,

Your reasons for using gouache resonate with me. I've wondered again and again why it's not more popular with all the interesting things you can do with it, and its beauty. (Any insights here?) I'm always looking for gouache painters to inspire me. And you're one of them!!! I've been afraid you might switch to oil.

One thing I love is the matte finish, which gives it more of a pastel look than oil. But I'm guessing the varnish changes this?

I came to gouache by default because I need to use paint that has absolutely no smell due to being chemically sensitive. Watercolor would work but since I paint lying on my side, it runs down the paper, and I loose the opportunity to do the neat wet-in-wet techniques. So gouache fits the bill. I seem to be developing my own style as I experiment. Sometimes it works and sometimes it's a mess!

Selene

Old Tex
08-27-2007, 01:35 PM
Hey there, Selene,

I think there's no question (with some exceptions) that oils are going to sell more - and for a higher price - than most other media. My guess is that watercolor probably comes next. I think that and the fact that the general public never heard of gouache, explains why it's not more popular. Like you, I search constantly for gouache painters, just to see how they do what they do. Some days I think I'm nuts for not switching, but then I haven't yet made a concerted effort to sell my originals, and until I do, I won't know how they'll do.

Yes, varnish does change the finish. Most people who work in gouache seem to prefer the matte finish. I don't have that strong feeling for it, one way or the other, and would prefer to frame my originals without mats and glass. The only way I can do that is to varnish them for protection. (As you can see, I'm not a real strong traditionalist.) I will say that the varnish does bring out a brilliance to the colors. In your case, I'd say stay away from varnishing, especially the spray kind, because it does have a strong smell and needs to be sprayed and left outside for about an hour or so.

And... you're right... sometimes it works and sometimes it just turns into a mess. I have a fair size stack of rejects and unfinished pieces that either just plain went wrong, or didn't measure up.

BeeCeeEss
09-03-2007, 09:16 PM
Ralph,

This is a beautiful painting. I love the sky especially. My first impression was that this looks like a pastel, but that's one of the things I like about gouache. You seem to have found a medium that really inspires you.

I haven't worked in gouache for many years but I have recently bought a set and will give it a whirl after I finish my current painting (an acrylic). Odd, but I, too, want my paintings to look like pastels.

I was a little surprised to see that you (sometimes) varnish your gouache paintings. I know it's risky. If you ever have intentions of submitting your gouache paintings to a show, you might want to reconsider the varnish idea. Some shows have very strict rules for water media paintings. From what I've read, they won't be accepted if they have any kind of varnish on them. That may only pertain to works on paper, however.

I painted with oils for many years but I've grown to really dislike the smell of the solvents and all the risk involved with using them. Tried the water soluble oils--didn't like them at all. So my default medium has been acrylics in recent years. But gouache is looking more and more attractive all the time. You've inspired me to give them a go.

Two of my favorite gouache painters are Carl Brenders and Morten Solberg (I hope I spelled his name correctly). Both are wildlife painters. Brenders' work is just incredible. Unfortunately, in recent years I believe Morten Solberg has switched to oils. I loved his water media paintings (sometimes a combination of watercolor and gouache) but I did not care at all for his oil paintings.

Thanks for the inspiration.

Beverly

Brad121
09-15-2007, 05:40 AM
Looks like a scene you could have painted in England...Although it looks a little warmer in your picture...

Excellent.

Old Tex
09-15-2007, 08:02 AM
I seem to have had limited online time lately, so I'm a bit late responding here.

Beverly, thank you for your kind comments. You're right about Brenders. Absolutely beautiful work. I find it interesting, and a tremendous compliment, that even as I search for my own "voice" in this medium, that others seem to find inspiration in what I'm doing. Never thought of my work that way.

Brad, thanks for looking and taking time to comment. As I continue to pursue landscapes, I find myself trying to produce work would look familiar to anyone anywhere. Thanks for the observation. Maybe I'm on the right track.