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maggie latham
07-21-2007, 08:56 AM
Hello everyone
My pastel cloth arrived yesterday, and I have been up half the night experimenting and wanted to share my thoughts on it:

*It is the most disgusting stuff I have ever painted on and makes my skin crawl!

*I can’t bear to touch it, and it looks like synthetic/ fiberglass/ with aluminum oxide grit! (Not actually sure what it is made up of)

*I particularly don’t like the shinny speckles (particles), which reminds me of aluminum oxide grit, and the components in some pastel grounds.

*It has eaten up all of my pastels, and you cannot blend at all.

OK, these are all the faults, and this is just MY opinion. I knew instantly that this was not a surface for me! Thank goodness I only have two yards of the stuff!
Still it is always good to try out different products, I believe this guides you back to the materials you are truly comfortable and compatible with.

I’m so glad that I only spent 5 hours with this product….not sure what I am going to do with two yards of it though! In my minds eye I thought it would be lovely linen treated canvas…..this is what happens when you live far away form the big cities and have to buy everything on line!

If you like to paint on velour or velvet…then this might be for you. I am much more of a sanded paper surface person myself.

Maggie

maggie latham
07-21-2007, 09:49 AM
Hello everyone,
Not one to give up too easily I have gone back to the painting I started in the wee hours, and have realized that I probably would have a better outcome if I switched to harder pastels. I have also put on a layer of acrylic matt medium with a palette knife over the entire painting, which has knocked back the icky fibers which were bothering me! It is beginning to look a lot like a painting on hand made Indian paper now.
This product, which I canít stand the feel ofÖÖ.has me intrigued, and I think I will give it a couple of days and try a few different approaches. Iíll take some pics along the way and post them.
I can see possibilities with this product, but have to figure out a way that works for me and for my style of painting. I should have been more restrained in my previous opinion, but that was my initial reaction to the surface. Comments and expertise are more than welcome from any one who has experience with pastel cloth.
Maggie

bluefish
07-21-2007, 10:14 AM
we told you it had two sides - the 'back' side that you painted on is almost the same as innerfacing which is a unique surface itself! yes, it is rough and somewhat difficult to paint on as both Peggy and I have attested to in other threads here, but it produces a rather unique painting, different than other surfaces conventionally available!

now turn the cloth over and unless they have changed the formulation, it should appear like a fine linen - this side will not 'eat' up your pastels as your 'aluminum oxide' paper does but also will not hold the volume of pastel you're accustomed to! It will blend very beautifully and you can do your watercolor underpainting with no problem - try the 'beautiful' side and let us know of your successes! Your 'stick' boats should really be impressive on this side!

You're adventurous, it will be fun to hear all the 'new' techniques you develop with your new found friend(P-Cloth)! - You may entice Peggy or I to give give your 'new' technique a whirl! :smug:

have FUN!.........'bluefish':)

MChesleyJohnson
07-21-2007, 01:04 PM
Interesting! I've not used it before. Do you mount the cloth in any way, such as on board, prior to painting on it?

PeggyB
07-21-2007, 01:08 PM
You're adventurous, it will be fun to hear all the 'new' techniques you develop with your new found friend(P-Cloth)! - You may entice Peggy or I to give give your 'new' technique a whirl! :smug:
have FUN!.........'bluefish':)

:lol: :lol: :lol: I think I've had it with "enticements" for awhile. I've been working at glassless pastels and spray acrylic varnish and have decided I don't like the lack of spontinaity and how much the values darken to the point of loosing the lightest of them. In the past, I'd tried the Bill/Trish method, and it too was too time consuming for my interest. So I'm back to square one, and happier after the experiment.

As for pastel cloth - well Maggie all the reasons you've given for not liking it are pretty much the same as mine. I've used both sides of the cloth, hard pastels, soft pastels, underpainting, etc and still don't like it mostly for the reason Blue gave - it doesn't hold the layers I like to apply! If nothing else I've come to know what I do like about putting soft pastel to sanded surfaces. :)

Peggy

PeggyB
07-21-2007, 01:09 PM
Interesting! I've not used it before. Do you mount the cloth in any way, such as on board, prior to painting on it?

It may be mounted on a board, stretched on canvas stretchers or just taped to a backing board as you would pastel paper. In that regard it is versitile.
Peggy

maggie latham
07-21-2007, 05:58 PM
:cat:
Hello,
With my first attempts, I mounted a small 4x5 piece onto gatorfaom board using acrylic matt medium. I scuffed up the gatorboard a little and applied the medium to the back (smooth side of the pastel cloth), then put it under a few books for a couple of hours. For a larger piece of 9x12, I didnít have any gatorboard to hand, so mounted it in the same way with acrylic medium to a 9x12 watercolor block. I figured that as the watercolor paper (140lb) was as tight as a drum on the block, that it would be sturdy enough for me to work on. When I have finished the painting I will tear it off, and then I can crop it to fit a mat.
I have played around with the fibrous, rough side, but will play around with the other side as Fish suggested. I couldnít get the fibrous side to adhere to gatorboard, but will try again with a pva glue. It could be stretched on stretcher bars, but you would have to varnish it with acrylic brush-on or spray varnish. I think it is easier to work on a sturdy service.
Maggie