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View Full Version : Yet another Plein Air question


Doodlebug1967
07-10-2007, 11:11 AM
I've got a PA workshop that I'm taking at the end of August and everyone here and in the PA forum have been most helpful with advice to prepare me for it. However, there is one question I'm still unsure about and only my fellow pastellists can answer this one.

How do you transport your paintings from the PA site without smudging them? The only thing I could think of was to precut the paper to the size I think I want to use and mount it to foam core and hinge a "mat" from another piece of foam core to that so I can stack any pieces I work on. Is there a simpler way?

Merrily,
Ronda

rr113
07-10-2007, 11:54 AM
Glassline sheets between pastels is usually what's used to prevent damage. It is available at most art stores in rolls which you can adapt to your needs. On the other hand Dakota arts has devised system for that. See this link for their system without paper:

http://www.dakotapastels.com/studio.shtml

They also have pastel papers that are punched to fit in a three-ring notebook.

Plein Aire equipment is usually kept to the minimal, but I image at a workshop you will not be trekking into the wilderness much.

Best
Richard

PeggyB
07-10-2007, 12:02 PM
How do you transport your paintings from the PA site without smudging them? The only thing I could think of was to precut the paper to the size I think I want to use and mount it to foam core and hinge a "mat" from another piece of foam core to that so I can stack any pieces I work on. Is there a simpler way?

Merrily,
Ronda

Well I'd say this are a couple simple way. Most PA painters come prepared to paint no larger than 11 X 14 - or about a quarter sheet size of pastel paper. I see a lot of oil/acrylic painters working on 9 X 12 canvas too. So here's a method I like (courtesy of our own Deborah Secor :) ). Buy a tablet of drawing paper that's slightly larger than the paintings you will be doing (I use a 16 X 20 tablet to cover most any size I'd do in field) - the kind that comes with a spiral binder. When you finish you work, tape all four corners of the painting to the second sheet of paper in the tablet. Then place the first sheet of paper on top of it and securely tape the bottom two edges together so they don't rub against one anther when you open the tablet to place the next painting into this "packet". This is an inexpensive method of transport. If you have worries about the surface of the top sheet removing pastel from your painting, you can precut sheets of glissine to fit on top of your artwork, and cover the paintings with that before putting the top sheet of paper on it.

Lately though I've gone a bit more "high tech" with the Dakota Pastel Portfolio that has glassine inserts. It is very easy to use. However, I just went to their website and can't find them listed there! It's a bit early to call them right now, but I'll do that later and let you know if they still carry them. I hope so as you can get additional inserts and it makes a good place to store your unframed pastels.

Peggy

Sorry Richard - looks like we cross posted! Great minds and all that!

Doodlebug1967
07-10-2007, 12:09 PM
Peggy and Richard. Thanks for your helpful comments. I've never used glassine. Does it really not smear or pull pastel from the paper surface? I read a LOT of people on here using it so there must be some kind of magic to it to work for so many people. I'll definately look into that before my workshop. I think we have several locations to go to during the 3 days we are there. However, I don't think there will be a lot of trekking at all. Only time will tell with that one ;)

Again, thanks so much,
Ronda

Donna T
07-10-2007, 12:25 PM
Hi Ronda, I use an 11x14 pad of tracing paper to transport my finished pastels. The sheets are smooth and don't remove any pastel. I use binder clips to secure the whole thing so nothing moves around inside. I hope your workshop is a good one!

Donna T

chewie
07-10-2007, 03:45 PM
i also do as donna t just mentioned. works well, and i even got my tracing pad at a dollar store, so talk about a cheap method! then, if by odd chance someone buys the painting i've done, i can tape tracing paper onto the painting so they can take it to a framers. just remember the tape!

Doodlebug1967
07-10-2007, 04:46 PM
I have some small pads of tracing paper. I may have to experiment with that to see what it does so I'll be comfortable. Thanks for the suggestions!

Ronda

PeggyB
07-11-2007, 01:01 PM
Peggy and Richard. Thanks for your helpful comments. I've never used glassine. Does it really not smear or pull pastel from the paper surface? Again, thanks so much,
Ronda

Treated roughly enough, anything can smear a pastel. However, if you tape the glissine in place over the pastel it won't smear at all. It may pick up some of the loose particles of of pastel, but it won't smear & it does stay in place on the glissine so you don't need to fear "mixing" one color onto another on the artwork when you remove the glissine. When finished using it on one painting I just take a paper towel to the glissine and wipe off the pastel so I can use it again and again if needed.

One thing to remember not to use: waxed paper. Waxed paper is an ok cover if you are transporting your work from class on a cold to mild day, and know you are going to remove it when you get home. However, I've known of people who did this on a hot day, left it in the car while shopping for groceries, and then took it to the framer only to find the waxed paper had melted right into the pastel! The work was totally ruined. Therefore, I buy glissine by the 25 foot roll - and have multiple rolls! :)

Peggy