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C_Line
06-29-2007, 07:14 PM
I was daydreaming today about what it would be like to have one day to paint with any artist from history, who would it be?

If you had one day to take one historical artist somewhere near your home to paint, who would it be? Where would you take them? What would you ask them? What do you think they would ask you? Knowing what you do about acrylics & more modern materials (e.g. acrylics, mediums, etc.), what do you think you'd share with them and how do you think they'd like it?

Guess mine would be Monet. Probably take him to Woodward Park, a lovely naturalized setting. I'd ask him how he planned for a painting and what did he think was his key strategy for capturing light and ambience. Sorry, I have no idea what he'd ask me. I'd probably share glazing mediums with him as it offers the opportunity to create luminous layered colors and allows for such spontaneity. I think he'd like acrylics very much being such an art pioneer.

What about you?

MaloCS
06-29-2007, 07:18 PM
I would seek out Diego Rivera and squeeze him for every bit of mural knowledge he has.

:D

idylbrush
06-29-2007, 08:10 PM
Piero della Francesca or Magritte

Linee
06-29-2007, 08:41 PM
Mary Casset or Monet. Or both? ;) I don't know what we'd discuss, but I would love the opportunity to paint with either of them. I would love to see Casset paint the beautiful skin tones that she did. I 'd love to paint the atmosphere of a landscape like Monet could.

C_Line
06-29-2007, 08:46 PM
Okay, guys, this is good. Hmm, giving me some research to do is see.

Café LoLa
06-29-2007, 08:49 PM
Carravaggio or Rembrandt because they work magic with dramatic light and darkness. Delacroix because of his movements and colours, and Van Gogh for the same reason.

C_Line
06-29-2007, 08:57 PM
Howard, I didn't know much about Piero della Francesca, but quickly searching the internet, I found his "The Flagellation" to have a remarkably modern feel to the composition despite being from the 15th Century. Magritte .. very cool indeed.

This is good...helps me get to know you better and all the wonderful artists history has given us.

swampborn
06-29-2007, 09:00 PM
Monet-I'd be so in awe I'd just sit and watch him paint.
Gail

stevenbg
06-29-2007, 09:01 PM
Edgar Degas, without a doubt.

JamesDFarrow
06-29-2007, 09:38 PM
Leonardo Da Vinci

To ask him if it's a man or a woman.

James :)

P.S. If you are an artist you shouldn't have to ask. :D

Lady Carol
06-29-2007, 11:41 PM
Carravaggio but he was totally looney so I am not sure I would want him for the afternoon.

C_Line
06-30-2007, 12:17 AM
I was kinda thinking that too Carol about some artists...maybe we could go together, ya know to keep an eye on things (haha).

Linee
06-30-2007, 12:35 AM
Edgar Degas, without a doubt.

I just read that Degas was Cassatt's mentor. :) (I spelled her name wrong in my first post...:o )

timelady
06-30-2007, 06:23 AM
Turner. Easy. :)

Tina.

nostalgia
06-30-2007, 06:55 AM
Carl Spitzweg and Michelangelo.

Oh and Vermeer and I would ask him who the girl with the pearl earring was. :D Monet would be nice too. :)

edtree
06-30-2007, 08:23 AM
Probably Zula Kenyon if I had to pick one. I love her portraits and landscapes. I would invite her over for lunch in my garden :)

C_Line
06-30-2007, 09:10 AM
I just read that Degas was Cassatt's mentor. :) (I spelled her name wrong in my first post...:o )

We knew who you meant :) ... I also read that Cassatt was responsible for introducing American art collectors to some of the French Impressionists as a sort of an agent.

C_Line
06-30-2007, 09:12 AM
Wouldn't it be interesting if we found out that what we think we "know" about these famous artists and our interpretation of their works/intent or our theories was askew from the reality?

Viuhti
06-30-2007, 10:29 AM
A day or even a week would not be enough with Leonardo. Rembrandt and Degas would be interesting too. Would have loved to work in any of their studios as an assistant.

Charlie's Mum
06-30-2007, 06:08 PM
Caravaggio for his light .
... ditto Rembrandt but for his use of paint also.
Da Vinci for his wide-ranging mind and superb drawing.
Michelangelo for his dedication and single-mindedness.
Degas for catching the fleeting moment.
Monet for his colour .
Giotto for his vision in freeing us from the iconography of the dark ages.
Rousseau - because I love his child-like vision of the world.

Guess I don't have any one favourite :D

C_Line
06-30-2007, 06:22 PM
I hear you Maureen...too hard to narrow down.

Assaf
06-30-2007, 07:03 PM
I might try Michaelangelo or Leonardo, but this is a hard question to answer - most of the great artists were not people you'd want to hang around. If Van-Gogh was my roommate and send me any severed bodypart, I would double his rent.

In theory, minus the personality issues, it would've been interesting to see Magritte do his work, and Leonardo does the theoretical sketching.

amurphy
06-30-2007, 07:53 PM
After a long think about this, if I had a dinner party, I'd make it a girls night.

Emily Carr for creating a whole new way to paint in her fiftys.
Frida Kahlo because she broke all the molds.
Georgia O' Keeffe for her use of strong clear color.

That would just be for the the modern female artists I admire. These 3 women were born when women did not even have the vote. To acheve what they did in such a male dominated profession is remarkable. I think the conversation around the table would be .........inspiring!

formerlyunknownart
06-30-2007, 08:44 PM
For me there would be a few...

First VerMeer for his use of light and I'd really love a first hand lesson in doing cloth from him.

Valesquez for his wonderful portraits

Emily Carr , but it would be me transporting back to her era... I'd love to go paint the Indian Villages of Northern BC with her.

Last Frida Kahlo, because... wow... just wow!! I'd love to drink tequilla with her and paint down in Mexico... meeting Chavela Vargas when she was younger would be incredible too.

Enchanted
06-30-2007, 08:58 PM
Oscar Bluemner or Charles Birchfield.

:thumbsup:

Roger Evans
06-30-2007, 09:54 PM
As a graduation present in 1976, I had the opportunity to go visit Norman Rockwell. My dad said he would pay for my trip, if I wanted to go. I declined because I was young and stupid and figured I had all the time in the world and, besides, I had much more important things to do. Later I found out that, even though he was ailing from emphysema, Mr. Rockwell spent much time on his front porch and would talk for hours with anyone that stopped by to sit a spell. He died only two years later. I was a fool. It is something that I will always regret.

Roger

Café LoLa
06-30-2007, 10:29 PM
Speaking of women artists - Berthe Morisot of the Impressionist era, and a femal French portraiteur in the 18th or 19th century, a Le Brun, or one who married a Le Brun?... - to go ahead and follow her desire to paint in a world in which society expects women to set aside her paintbrushes of her youth, or at least stick with watercolours on her vacation and pursue a married life.

C_Line
07-01-2007, 12:01 AM
Rosa Bonheur is another artist I'd love to paint with...very extraordinary woman it seems.

C_Line
07-01-2007, 12:01 AM
As a graduation present in 1976, I had the opportunity to go visit Norman Rockwell. My dad said he would pay for my trip, if I wanted to go. I declined because I was young and stupid and figured I had all the time in the world and, besides, I had much more important things to do. Later I found out that, even though he was ailing from emphysema, Mr. Rockwell spent much time on his front porch and would talk for hours with anyone that stopped by to sit a spell. He died only two years later. I was a fool. It is something that I will always regret.

Roger

Wow...I bet you do regret that. He's another one of my favs.

bushma'am
07-01-2007, 01:01 AM
Not old but in current history - 'David Shepherd' and 'Robert Bateman'

laudesan
07-01-2007, 02:44 AM
Hopper - Sargeant - Contable - and many many more..:D

rmc
07-01-2007, 06:28 AM
Umm ... I think any of the impressionist painters would be great - to learn how they captured light...
Being quite the art heathen, I am going to bookmark this thread and look up all the various artists you guys have mentioned which I've not been aware of.
Thanks for this - great question, Celeste

C_Line
07-01-2007, 08:22 AM
Super idea Ruth...I've done that on some too and already the list has grown...oh, so much to learn...so little time.

gaykir
07-01-2007, 09:09 AM
Geez, I'd be happy with an afternoon watching Roger Evans or Howard!!

pakc
07-01-2007, 10:59 AM
Jackson Pollock...
I actually touched his painting in the national gallery......
made chills go through my spine.

Bob Rooney
07-01-2007, 11:26 AM
M.C. Escher, although I suppose he would be regarded more as an illustrator than painter.

C_Line
07-01-2007, 04:49 PM
Jackson Pollock...
I actually touched his painting in the national gallery......
made chills go through my spine.

Yeah, I was thinking Pollock would be awesome too, although, I'd just be standing there watching I'm afraid!

C_Line
07-01-2007, 04:50 PM
M.C. Escher, although I suppose he would be regarded more as an illustrator than painter.

...illustrators are artists in my book!

idcrisis55
07-01-2007, 05:14 PM
I would love to just watch Rembrandt and Sargent. Rembrandt's light and drama are what draw me to him but Sargent's work is one that really excites my senses. Since time can only be spent with them via the web or a book or a museum, then I would go for plein air or in studio with Larry Seiler, and Marc Hanson, still life with Maverick, figurative work with Pauline Adair, florals with Celeste, Elaine and Ruth plus our very own Mods, Carol and Maureen, and abstracts with Howard. Whew, what a list and that doesn't even begin to cover the talent at Wet Canvas.

C_Line
07-01-2007, 05:32 PM
Thanks Ann and ditto to you! Guess we get to do that already don't we thanks to WC.

Paulafv
07-01-2007, 07:50 PM
As a child I could not decide which ice cream flavor to choose: chocolate, my favorite, or lemon sherbet or pistachios and then I met butter crunch. Agony.
And you want me to choose a favorite artist with whom to spend the day and converse? Aggggh. I want them all...each in his time to fit my mood of the day.

That's what's so nice about Wet Canvas. There are so many favorite artists who share freely their paintings, talents and methods, not to mention the books they recommend (STOP, please).

How about, if I had to pick, Eric Carle, who illustrates many books for children so very well. He's still alive and doable. His new last year, Panda book looks as though it's done with acrylics. A few wavy lines and there's the sea for the green sea turtle, a few more lines and the sea lion is diving deep; the bald eagle (just taken off the endangered species list, but you can't kill him), flies through the floating sky of turquoise, blue-purple white clouds dripping onto a gray brown ground. So simple, a child can delight in it; so beautiful an adult can only wonder. That is the Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What do you See? The Very Busy Spider is my favorite to read to a two year old and she appreciates its repetition. I'm just a kid at heart, I guess.

My favorite Rembrandt was the painting stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum about 10-12 years ago, and his only seascape, of Jesus on the ship during a storm in the Sea of Galilee. Every time I walked into that gallery, I was drawn to it. I was personally ticked off that the thieves chose my favorite to take.

The huge Sargent painting of the Spanish dancer is so well set at the end of a corridor encompassing the entire wall, it cannot be missed, but there was a smaller Sargent in one of the side rooms that caught my fancy. So long ago, I can't recall which one it was...only that I was very impressed. If you ever get to Boston, you must visit this gem of a museum which is actually a palace removed from Venice brick by brick and set in Boston around the corner from the Museum of Fine Arts. Park once and see two museums, if you are very quick on your feet and don't stop to gaze; then, go back five times to do it again, slower. Food is supposed to be good in both museums, so you can spend the day...or a hop skip and jump back to downtown Boston on the T-train and a short walk to China Town where you can bask in foods not so familiar. If you like to walk, you can avoid the T and simply walk to China Town, maybe a mile or two. You can really walk all over Boston if you are a walker.

Some of Van Gogh's less familiar works interest me, and Monet's. I may be spoiled by over exposure to these artists. I fall in love with every new piece of art I see, if it appeals to me. I am fickle, but my ice cream choice has settled down to chocolate, if it is done perfectly. If not, pistachio, and on an odd day, butter crunch. I have the choice to take my lemons straight these days, and cook with them and make lemon tea with them...all beginning with the sherbet. Perhaps art is like that...a beginning, ongoing, no ending.

C_Line
07-01-2007, 09:30 PM
Beautiful Paula. Have you seen Allen Say's works? Children's writer/illustrator. Exquisite watercolors. Exquisite. Try Grandfather's Journey.

Lovely thoughts...now just imagine painting with these folks!

LavenderFrost
07-05-2007, 08:32 PM
LOL James, that made me laugh.

My favourite artists are alive, like Robert Bateman and Donna Quinn. From history, I think Constable. With any of them, though, I would just want to watch them work.

howyadoin
07-06-2007, 01:48 AM
Seriously? I'd go with a few contemporary artists: Robert Williams, Simon Bisley, or - most likely - Bill Sienkiewicz.

chammi kaiser
07-06-2007, 02:57 AM
I would love to spend a day with Sir Edwin Henry Landseer (1802-1873) who painted the most beautiful animal pictures. His painting of a stag with softly focused mountains in the background takes my breath away. We would wander together through woods and farms and up mountain paths. I would watch in awe as he sketches and draws and captures creatures in his sketchbook. Perhaps I could make him smile with my crazy animal paintings.

C_Line
07-06-2007, 07:07 AM
Great stuff guys!

MadMaddy
07-08-2007, 11:02 AM
hmm, tough question.
for landscape, i would have to say Albert Bierstadt. There is such and incredible breath taking detail and scale of his work. I would love to see how they did it.
Leonardo, for figure work and since he seemed to be always on a quest for knowlege of the world around him, I think he would be fascinated with the modern discoveries and many of the things we take for granted.
Van Gogh for his colors and I would like to get to know him a bit just to find out what he was really like and what made him see the world as he did.
and I think Sargent. I love the movement in his picture of the dancer and his portraits were wonderful.

There are many others that went through my mind, but there is just no way to list them all.