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View Full Version : Painting on ceramic jars? Help please


mame
06-13-2001, 06:42 PM
Not an expert but done a bit of ceramics.
These look like they've been glazed (glazes are for the most part ground up glass I think)and high-fired. Suspect acrylic/oil will not adhere.

If the glaze is glass no amount of sanding will "tooth" it up enough to hold either. I see all kinds of china paint on the market and in fact if I can find the darn site I saw recently I'll post it here. Think there are a number of china craft paints made for just this kind of project.

marylin h
06-13-2001, 09:21 PM
Enamels that are baked in the oven after applying. Like what you are seeing on glasses and such. Otherwise, it will all come off in the wash. Can find in the craft stores.

timelady
06-14-2001, 12:42 AM
I posted this in the china painting forum too, but it's just a strange question so I thought I'd post it here too...

I just bought some nice little vintage jars that I thought would be nice to paint on in addition to my canvases. Now first off, let me say I'm an oil painter... never tried anything like this before! The jars look clay and then glazed, ceramic maybe? I don't even know the right terminology, but you can see the bottom of the jars in the photo and it's not glazed.

I figured I'd paint and then varnish over. They'd be for decorative purposes only. Any suggestions on medium? I've got oil paint, oil printing inks, acrylic paints... (my original idea was monoprints - usually I paint on glass then transfer to paper. So I figured I could paint on acetate then wrap around the jar to transfer to the jar.) Basically, I'm concerned about what would or wouldn't peel off or flake off or whatever. Hopefully varish would solve that problem with any medium.

Experts feel free to give advise or just tell me I'm being ridiculous. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Tina.


<IMG SRC="http://www.tina-m.com/art/jars.jpg" border=0>

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http://www.tina-m.com
&lt;BR&gt;May the Force be with You.

timelady
06-14-2001, 06:25 AM
Oh bummer... I tried acrylics and they seem to be holding okay. Need to do a few more layers and see what happens.

I don't want to buy new supplies for this - it was just a bit of a whim since the jars/bottles were only 1 each at a local junk store. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Thanks for the advice!

Tina.

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http://www.tina-m.com
&lt;BR&gt;May the Force be with You.

mame
06-14-2001, 07:15 AM
What if after painting (w/acrylic) you seal with Shellac? Haven't a clue if it will work on high fired surface but I had a couple of hand coiled pots that were raiku fired. I decided to try painting them with acrylic. They were porous so no problem with the paint adhering but wanted a high sheen so varnished them with Amber Shellac. They turned out great.

Leaflin
06-27-2001, 08:30 AM
Tina
There is a product called PermEnamel put out by Delta. It dries to the touch in about 30 minutes, but should be allowed to cure at least 10 days before washing.You brush on a conditioner, let dry, apply paint with a dry brush (no water) then topcoat. This sounds like more than you really wanted to do. But if you are interested here is their web site.
www.deltacrafts.com

Your pieces there look like stoneware, probably fired at cone 5 or 2160 degrees. You should take them to antiques road show if it is ever in London and find your fortune. LOL :D