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Diana_pastels
05-08-2007, 03:48 PM
I am ready to frame my first pastel and just need to make sure I am doing it correctly. I tried a search but cannot find a thread just on framing pastels. So here is what I think I need to do and please correct me if I am wrong!
1) Mount the picture to some kind of backing - foam board or something similar. Do I need to use special tape? Or is there a certain way I need to mount it to the backing.

2) Use a mat.

3) Frame under glass. Do I need to back the frame with something?

I know these are very basic questions. :o I just finally have something that I am happy to frame and don't want to ruin it!:D

Diana

Bringer
05-08-2007, 04:45 PM
Hi Diana,

First one has to consider what quality one wants. And of course that quality means more money. However IT IS important not to forget that many times expensive is what is bad and not what costs a bit more money.
Paper works should be hinged using at least an acid free tape (not the same as archival) or using an archival paper like mulberry and using wheat starch.
Paper should only be fixed on top.
The backing board once again should be at least acid free and preferably archival (100% rag). Same for the mat.
If the mat is not too thick I do prefer a good anti-reflective glass, especially when the work is or has lots of darks which tend to reflect alot.
If not using a mat, a frame spacer is desirable. There should be a distance between the work and the glass to avoid condensation. And the mat, besides its aesthetical function also absorbs humidity before it reaches the work.

Kind regards,

José

*Marina*
05-08-2007, 05:13 PM
Here is an excellent thread about framing. Might give an answer to a lot of your questions. Good luck.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=283509

wabbitt
05-08-2007, 06:02 PM
I'm just finishing up a drawing/composition class this week. We had to mount and mat one of our projects. Although we used plain ol' masking tape, http://www.dickblick.com/zz173/10/ is what's recommended because it is reversable with water. YOu see the T's in the picture? The method is described on the box and hinging (as opposed to taping it down flat) allows the piece to shrink/stretch as it's affected by temperature & humidity.

I got quite an education at Aaron Brothers the day I went looking for the mat. Talk is free. Hopefully you get someone as knowledgeable as I did.

Diana_pastels
05-08-2007, 06:43 PM
Thank you, Jose, Marina, and Julie for your info. Holy moly, didn't realize that framing is more complicated than the actual painting! I don't think I can justify the price of having my first work professionally framed so I thought I would do it myself. But, there sure is a lot that goes into it!
Diana

*Marina*
05-08-2007, 06:46 PM
You can do it easily yourself Diana. Try to get a standard mat and frame. Will bring the cost down quite a bit. Just hinge it to the back of the mat, bit of foam core behind it and then close the frame. Good luck.

Bringer
05-08-2007, 10:28 PM
You can do it easily yourself Diana. Try to get a standard mat and frame. Will bring the cost down quite a bit. Just hinge it to the back of the mat, bit of foam core behind it and then close the frame. Good luck.


Hi again,

In case the foamcore is not archival, I would put an acid free paper between the work and the foamcore.

Kind regards,

José

soap
05-08-2007, 11:15 PM
Hi
Its easy! Get some mat board (ideally acid free) and stick your painting to it (only use tape at the top of your painting so it won't bubble or bulge and it 'hangs' down). Get a mat and put that over it (you can buy ready made ones or if you have a mat cutter, cut your own). Put this sandwich in a frame with glass. All ready made frames with glass have a backboard as well.
Done.
Don't worry too much about archival quality and all unless you intend to keep this painting in this frame for the next century.....LOL....

nana b
05-08-2007, 11:52 PM
I just framed my first two but didn't mat. If you don't mat then you don't hinge your painting, at least that is what I read and was told. I used a 9x12 gold frame and I used conservation glass. I cleaned the glass good, (be sure you use a very soft lint free cloth, not paper towells:eek:) with conservation glass you can't just use any cleaner but i used the foam cleaner that the Hobby Lobby framing dept uses, put it in the frame with the side that is uv coated in toward the painting, cut and stuck in spacer strips around the glass, layed the painting face down very carefully and then the acid free faomboard cut to fit. I used a framing point tool and inserted the framing points, glued dust paper on the back and then attached the swivel loops and the wire. I was quite proud of myself if I may say so myself:smug: It does look great I think. The only trouble I had was having to take the points out to remove a couple of specks of pastel that had come loose. The pastel is a lot more stable than I thought it was going to be. I was a little nervous about that part of it but it really worked out well and I saved a lot of money:clap:. Good luck with your framing!

nana b

rr113
05-10-2007, 12:48 PM
All good advice above, but I thought I would mention that wholesale sources are incredible less expensive than retail. In New York State, where I live, I got what is called a "resale number" from the state. This is officially so that I can collect sales tax. This qualifies me to purchase from companies that mainly supply framing stores. (In fact, framers are a little bit peeved when artists do this because they want their business.) However, frames that cost $16 wholesale (made in China, of course) are offered for $100's retail. The markup in framing stores is as outrageous as the markup in eyeglass stores. That's why there are so many of them. I do some framing for friends so I think I can qualify as a framer. But the wholesale places like Decor Moulding don't care. Some do. They want you to state that you have a framing store on a street front.

Richard

maggie latham
05-10-2007, 08:28 PM
:cat:
Hello,

Why don’t you take your painting with you to the local art store where they have frames already made, and see what looks nice. You should be able to buy a ready cut double mat there also ~ quite inexpensively. When Customers buy one of my Giclee prints, I always tell them to take it with them when they go to buy a frame.

I do most of my own framing, and buy mats and frames in bulk at wholesale prices. I use an archival linen self adhesive tape to ‘hinge’ the painting to the back of the mat. Never have hinged it to the backing board. You can use a piece of mat board, foam core or gator foam for the backing. Most ready-made frames come with everything except the mat and the painting!

Good luck, and I hope it looks really pretty for you.

:cat:

scoller
05-10-2007, 08:52 PM
Diana,

1) Make sure the mat is 100% acid and linge free. Some mats i.e. Crescent Decorative mats have and acid free linge free front and back, however the core is not. You want it all acid and linge free. Crescent Rag Mats are good or if you want to pay more Crescent Muesum Mats

2) Foam core is the best backing you can use.

3) Make sure the glass is conservation glass (95% UV protective). DO NOT get UV glass from the locale glass store. It traps the UV rays between the glass and the artwork.

4) Keep in mind the purpose of the matting and framing are to hold and set off the art work. My wife and I often disagree over the choice of mats. As the artist she sees it one way - as the framer I see it differently :lol: .

scoller
05-11-2007, 11:03 AM
Diana,

One thing that was forgotten. There is a product out there called "rabbet tape" which is a good idea, but hard to use. The purpose is to put another layer of protection between the artwork and wood of the frame. Here is a little trick that can save you money and headaches.

Take a strip of high quality scotch tape (No. 810) sealing the edge of the glass, mat, and foam core. This is a much easier process and cheaper than using "rabbet tape".

A good source of frames is the locale thrift store. Or if you are crazy like me you can also make them from scratch. Either way. Enjoy the journey.

ArtSavesLives
05-17-2007, 03:39 PM
When I frame a soft pastel work, I use an acid free foam core base. However I learned that the actual mat should also be spaced above the image, so that pastel dust which may loosen as it hangs will fall behind the mats, and not onto the beveled edge. So I use strips of mat, glued o the back side of my mat, to create a space between the mat and the picture.

Daveylynn
05-18-2007, 01:21 PM
Thanks for the Wetcanvas links to framing information. New to pastels, I had professional framers do my first two pieces. On the second one they only used the double mat plus another mat as a spacer. At least they said the mat was used as a spacer - I could not tell if it was there. The result was that upon receiving the framed art, I noticed that some pastel had transfered to the Tru Vue Museum glass. They redid the framing job and used a foam core spacer. It did the trick, but it does seem far away.

Since it was so expensive, I now want to try my hand at matting and framing. I've had a good mat cutter for years and really never used it much. Plus, one of my hobbies is wood working so I'm ready to tackle that as well. Yikes, learning three things at once - good thing I just retired! :)

Anyhow, I spent this week locating online references. The one thing I could not find out was how deep the rabbit should be when making or purchasing ready-made frames. Sounds like it needs to be 1/2 inch and that the common 3/8 inch won't work? I'm wondering if 7/16 inch is enough?

I thought I'd share the links to some sites I found:

PM Builds 6 Different Styles Of Picture Frames (see framing section at end of article)
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/woodworking/1273401.html

Conservation Procedures -- How to Do Your Own Matting and Hinging
http://www.nedcc.org/resources/leaflets/7Conservation_Procedures/04MattingAndHinging.php

Care, Matting, and Framing of Pastel Paintings
http://www.studiofox.com/care.html

Care and Framing of Pastels
http://www.mcbridegallery.com/pastelcareof.html

Framing Matting & Caring For Pastel Painting
http://www.creativespotlite.com/pastels/care-matting-framing-pastel.htm

Framing Pastelbord
http://www.ampersandart.com/tips/framing/framing_pb.html

How to Frame Your Oriental Art (good photos of the process)
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/howtoframe.php

Matless Pastel Framing
http://www.frametek.com/HTML/Articles/pastel.html

How to Cut a Picture Frame Mat
http://www.ehow.com/how_11954_cut-picture-frame.html

How to Cut Mats
http://www.fixaframe.com.au/mats.php?section=matcuts

How to make your own custom wooden frames for your artwork, portraits and photographs
http://www.knottyplans.com/index.php?page=200421

Making Picture Frames (many free online tutorials)
http://www.clubframeco.com/how_to_make_picture_frames.html

Donna A
05-19-2007, 03:32 AM
Thanks for the Wetcanvas links to framing information. New to pastels, I had professional framers do my first two pieces. On the second one they only used the double mat plus another mat as a spacer. At least they said the mat was used as a spacer - I could not tell if it was there. The result was that upon receiving the framed art, I noticed that some pastel had transfered to the Tru Vue Museum glass. They redid the framing job and used a foam core spacer. It did the trick, but it does seem far away.

Since it was so expensive, I now want to try my hand at matting and framing. I've had a good mat cutter for years and really never used it much. Plus, one of my hobbies is wood working so I'm ready to tackle that as well. Yikes, learning three things at once - good thing I just retired! :)

Hi! There are several brands of spacers which have got to be easier and less expensive than a 'store-bought" mat spacer and faster/less trouble than making your own spacer by cutting a mat! Econospacer is one--and am a blank right now on the other brandname I have known of.

So many of us use linen liners rather than paper/board mats. Just give a more "serious" look to your pastel paintings!

Be sure you use pH-balanced foam core board for the backing, not the slightly less-expensive acid-y version. Best wishes! Donna ;-}