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TxAggieDarlin
04-17-2007, 01:27 PM
or ...............tell me why or why not:


Do all of you always underpaint?

When do you know to use the complimentary color or umber? If this is addressed somewhere, just point me in that direction. Thanks
:o

idcrisis55
04-17-2007, 01:39 PM
I don't always underpaint but rather block in the shapes with the values of the color of the object. I haven't tried underpainting with the complementary color but will as soon as I get back to paintings rather than painting walls. When I have done underpainting I used a value range in grays. I need to try this with landscapes as well as still life to see how a landscape painting would go. One other thing I do though, is tone the canvas sometimes with a reddish or a golden tone. I like the glow that brings through.

mseymour
04-17-2007, 01:40 PM
I always underpaint. First I sketch the composition on the canvas, seal the sketch with a lightly-tinted imprimatura, then reinforce the sketch with a transparent layer, usually burnt umber, sometimes several layers. Then I'll do a complementary underpainting layer if I'm doing opaque color layers. (If I'm mostly glazing, I'll do a grisaille.) I believe underpainting makes the following layers richer and more interesting.

TxAggieDarlin
04-17-2007, 01:46 PM
Thanks for responding. I googled and found this:
It is really very helpful if you are interested in the topic

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/3261/292/



The more I look at it, the more I am amazed. If I could do that good in the underpainting, I would never use color.

Linee
04-17-2007, 02:21 PM
I haven't done underpainting with landscapes. I think I'll wait and see how Ann does with this. :) I usually just block in color, as well. The portraits that I have done with underpainting have turned out much better than the ones without underpainting.

jan409
04-17-2007, 03:04 PM
Yes I always under paint. I find it helps me to creat depth. Jan

timelady
04-17-2007, 03:16 PM
Er, um, yes. I think. I call it an underpainting anyway and it evolved from the very traditional idea of the tonal underpainting which I did when I painted more representationally. Since I moved towards abstract very gradually that underpainting simply evolved with me. I don't model my image in colour or tone, but having worked out my image composition my first layers are very specificly laid down to complement or contrast with what the end composition is. Colour/contrast rather than form, but that's simply because my work is about colour and space rather than form. ;)

Tina.

Einion
04-17-2007, 03:45 PM
Do all of you always underpaint?
No. I rarely do myself, in the traditional sense.

When do you know to use the complimentary color or umber?
I almost never use a complementary-coloured underpainting. I quite like it for skies (a salmony colour) but find it very difficult to work with for practically any other type of thing.

There's a little more on underpainting options in a thread in Colour Theory:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=325223

Einion

Thomas Greaves
04-17-2007, 04:33 PM
Having been a watercolourist for so many years i find the concept of underpainting to be somewhat alien. Never have done....doubt if I ever will.

C_Line
04-17-2007, 07:03 PM
I do an underpainting of sorts - I like to cover the whole canvas first with a loose version of the finished painting establishing values - sometimes neutral colors, sometimes complimentary like in the painting I'm currently working on "Anthurium". I was also taught that complimentary underpainting - especially in portraiture really enriches the colors and as mentions provides more depth. When you look at skin for example, there are undertones in real life, right? So with other things - it's just fun experimenting to see what you come up with. I believe underpainting allows one to see if a composition is going to work early on before too much paint goes on the canvas.

dreamz
04-17-2007, 09:23 PM
I seldom know where the painting is going until it tells me so I very seldom underpaint in the usual context, but then I do mostly landscapes

TxAggieDarlin
04-19-2007, 11:54 AM
Thanks all for the help and information. dreamsz, I loved your answer. I sure feel sometimes I don't know till the painting tells me and then I am surprised. I wonder if you should be surprised when you finish a painting?LOL

Linee
04-19-2007, 01:04 PM
Well, I decided to go ahead and start a landscape with an underpainting (actually I really get started tomorrow). The painting I'm doing seems to have a lot of umber in the shadows and rock, so I'll go with that for the underpainting.

idcrisis55
04-19-2007, 01:23 PM
TxAggieDarlin, have you started an underpainting? I see Linda is going to start one so now I get to see how she does it. :D I've been painting walls rather than canvas so hope to get a painting going soon. I have it sketched out. It would be great to see all the ones you all do with an underpainting.

Linee
04-19-2007, 05:34 PM
TxAggieDarlin, have you started an underpainting? I see Linda is going to start one so now I get to see how she does it. :D I've been painting walls rather than canvas so hope to get a painting going soon. I have it sketched out. It would be great to see all the ones you all do with an underpainting.

Guess what I came home with today? Two gallons of interior paint. Now who knows when I'll get to my landscape. I haven't done any real painting in a week. I'm starting to get withdrawal symptoms!! You may beat me to underpainting a landscape, yet, Ann. :rolleyes:

Charlie's Mum
04-19-2007, 06:26 PM
With a Still Life, yes.

With florals - usually now.

Here's a landscape I did fairly recently using a rough underpainting -

French Village (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=399713).

There's a Classroom thread about underpainting in the Information Kiosk - from 2005 I think.