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impressionist2
05-01-2002, 07:52 AM
Thinking lately about the great advantages of cropping. One big disadvantage of painting on canvases. Many times, the painting should have been a square instead of a rectangle.

Love the Aquabee canvasette and I can get it in large sizes. Either Mario or Leopoldo ( I think) said they show their oil on paper without glassing it.

Question: Can paper be glued to a stronger support? Which support would be best. I read that Elmer's glue acidifies the paper, so which glue would work?

What about canvas on masonite? How do you crop it ( sawing?) after it's painted and is that possible without wrecking the painting?

Thanks.

Renee

Ginette
05-01-2002, 03:43 PM
I am also very interested in the answers here.
I painted a few times in oil on paper but have yet to find the courage to glue them on a rigid surface.
I bought some "YES" paste.
All Purpose Stick flat Glue and it sounds like something that may work. it says:

Water based
Slow to set
Non Toxic
Almost Odor free
Acid free for Archival Work
Recyclable
Clear when dry

I still have not used it. Still afraid it may harm the paper & painting


Anybody familiar with that stuff?

Ginette

Linoxyn
05-01-2002, 04:16 PM
My choices in order.

1. You can use an archival starch paste to glue it down to hardboard. Seal the panel first with thinned out paste and let dry. Coat both surfaces. You have to weight the painting down until it sets.

2. Rabbit skin glue. Use it much the same as above. Maybe not as archival as the first but is still a well trusted or at least well understood material.

3. BEVA sheets. A sheet that is ironed (heat set) lightly, sandwiched in between your work and a support. Or BEVA glue. Applied to both sides and heat or quick tacked together. More expensive and some chemical exposure.

4. PVA, or acrylic polymer, or acrylic grounds.

artbabe21
05-06-2002, 12:09 PM
Ginette!!

Do stay away that 'Yes" paste, it's awful stuff, it turns brown & yucky after a few years & your work is ruined. It was once 'thought' to be archival but time has proven it not to be at all. I wrote the company for still saying on their label that it IS archival, telling them experiences regarding the brown,etc, they sent me an email full of fluff, trying to apease me. I think there are some better suggestions above. I threw a full jar away, though I loved 'using' the stuff, it's ease of application was a joy, yet the down fall of the product unacceptable!
Cathleen~

Mario
05-06-2002, 03:24 PM
THE way to go is with Oil paint on Watercolor paper (140lb) glued to Museum board. I had heard, (from a master painter, Stanley Bielen), to simply use Liquidtex(sp?) glue made sure there were no air bubbles. I have purchased such a work by him and it is flawless. Stanley made sure to glue an equaly weighted paper on the opposite side of the board so that the painting would always be counter-balanced. And then I framed it without glass, of course.
I have not glued my own work and so have never really looked into it further. Is there such a glue as Liquidtex or did I remember poorly ? thanks:confused:

mirza
05-06-2002, 04:40 PM
I used to paint on Indian watercolor paper in small sizes (6x8, 9x12). I liked the irregular texture and deckles. I used matte acrylic medium (maybe "Liquidtex" is Liquitex?) to glue the finished paintings to museum board, just brushed on, then weighted with a dictionary or the like. Not much texture in the paint so I didn't worry about impasto getting mashed. It's been about 8 years and the couple I still have are holding up fine (thank goodness, since I sold dozens of them). I did frame them under glass with a raised mat, however, since I wanted the edges to show.

I once saw some paintings that were on WC paper mounted to raw linen--that was a lovely look, but apparently the artist was keeping how he did it a secret.

Scott Methvin
05-06-2002, 06:00 PM
Originally posted by impressionist2
What about canvas on masonite? How do you crop it ( sawing?) after it's painted and is that possible without wrecking the painting?

Thanks.

Renee

Impy,

I just cut one this morning. Of course, I have a good saw to do it with. It's a scrollsaw. Tiny little blade. Made sure the painting was very dry and sanded the edges when done. No problemo. I usually don't use masonite, but I am experimenting with clayboard.

Einion
05-07-2002, 02:52 AM
Hi Renee, I have glued paper to hardboard many times and it's arguably the best support for this. Instead of glueing another sheet to the reverse to even up the tension I primed it with acrylic primer and sealed all edges while I was at it. I used PVAc glue mostly for this but I might have used acrylic medium once or twice.
Originally posted by impressionist2
I read that Elmer's glue acidifies the paper, so which glue would work?
Do you have any of the sources for this? Elmer's isn't archival-quality PVAc but it shouldn't acidify the paper.

Einion

Ginette
05-07-2002, 01:19 PM
Originally posted by artbabe21
Ginette!!

Do stay away that 'Yes" paste, it's awful stuff, it turns brown & yucky after a few years & your work is ruined. It was once 'thought' to be archival but time has proven it not to be at all. I wrote the company for still saying on their label that it IS archival, telling them experiences regarding the brown,etc, they sent me an email full of fluff, trying to apease me. I think there are some better suggestions above. I threw a full jar away, though I loved 'using' the stuff, it's ease of application was a joy, yet the down fall of the product unacceptable!
Cathleen~


Thanks a million Cathleen,

I have not even opened the jar yet and am glad you gave me this invaluable testimonial.

I see n this tread some really good suggestions.

Thanks again.

Ginette