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Katie D
04-13-2007, 10:26 AM
Back to the varnish--does anyone have any experience with liquitex soluvar varnish? I have some, but it says you first have to put liquitex gloss medium on top and then the soluvar, so I'm thinking what's the point? Also was looking at Windsor and Newton Conserv-art varnish and am wondering if that will say the same--that it must first have an isolation coat. I hate glossiness, even hate oil paintings varnished so I didn't want to pile on a lot of finish. Somebody mentioned Final Coat that's rubbed on with cloth--is this a good one to use? Thanks!

Einion
04-13-2007, 03:33 PM
Back to the varnish--does anyone have any experience with liquitex soluvar varnish? I have some, but it says you first have to put liquitex gloss medium on top and then the soluvar, so I'm thinking what's the point?
This is an added security measure that a number of the makers now recommend after researching what this type of varnish is like to remove.; you don't have to do it, it's just recommended. I think it's likely that it is a sound idea when there are light, thinned coats within a painting - if you paint in layers or do a number of subtle touches towards the end - which would be more subject to lifting during any future cleaning operation. But if you paint at least moderately thickly with fairly bodied paint you could probably skip it without too much worry.

If you'd like to read more on this there's a page on the Golden site that goes into some depth about why they suggest this, with some details of the cleaning operations etc.

Somebody mentioned Final Coat that's rubbed on with cloth--is this a good one to use?
Sorry, don't know that. Who makes it?

Einion

Katie D
04-13-2007, 04:10 PM
Hi Einion,
Thanks for taking the time to rehash this with me. It's so confusing--I was trying to research more on it and came up with this.

Acrylic Paintings and Varnishing

Traditionally, varnishes provide surface protection from abrasion, dust and dirt. They also provide saturation to the paint they cover. There are concerns as to whether or not to varnish acrylic paintings and many artists insist that their acrylic paintings be unvarnished. Varnishing acrylic paintings has several problems: 1) Acrylic resin proprietary varnishes have similar solubilities to those of acrylic paint. This necessitates the use of solvents which might damage the paint layer for their removal. 2) Traditional natural varnishes, such as dammar, will yellow in time and the solvent used in their removal will dissolve or soften the acrylic paint layer. A water soluble varnish may be an answer. It is an issue that manufacturers might be able to address.
http://www.si.edu/MCI/english/learn_more/taking_care/acrylic_paintings.htmlhttp://www.si.edu/MCI/english/learn_more/taking_care/acrylic_paintings.html
I just wanted to put a matte finish on to protect it, but I do use very thin layers and lots of them so I STILL CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHAT TO DO!! :confused:
I guess this is why I never end up varnishing them. Have you ever used Golden varnish? I did try liquitex one time and had problems with it, but it was a few years old so that may have been it. I'm not especially good at polyeurothane (have a tendency to overbrush and always see brushmarks) so I'm a bit leery. Thanks again!

Einion
04-14-2007, 10:40 AM
I guess this is why I never end up varnishing them.
Well you can of course do this if you want. If you then frame in a glazed frame problem solved - no varnish to worry about but the painting is protected.

You can choose not to varnish, even using galley-wrap or just framing normally, lots of people do - including professional artists - but you have to accept that the surface of the painting is exposed, so it's prone to damage in the long term (even just dust sitting on an acrylic painting over time can cause damage).

I just wanted to put a matte finish on to protect it, but I do use very thin layers and lots of them so I STILL CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHAT TO DO!! :confused: ... Have you ever used Golden varnish?
The Golden product (MSA) and Soluvar are very similar, so either would make a good choice.

Personally, regardless of archival concerns and any long-term aspirations for our work, varnishes of this type make good sense to me; if you screw up when applying a water-bourne acrylic coating then you may not be able to fix it. But with a spirit-soluble varnish you can always clean it off yourself if you had to, with very little risk to the acrylic underneath (since white spirit doesn't attack dry acrylic).

If you have a fair few paintings to varnish on a regular basis and you're not great at brushing it on (although you can of course get better with practice) you might consider investing in a small electric sprayer, the kind that doesn't require a separate compressor. These could make your varnishing go a lot easier and these sprayguns are not expensive any more, so it's not like you have to justify it, like "Well although it was $$$ it was worth it for the hassle it saved me." :)

Einion

Wassie
04-14-2007, 07:26 PM
Back to the varnish--does anyone have any experience with liquitex soluvar varnish? I have some, but it says you first have to put liquitex gloss medium on top and then the soluvar, so I'm thinking what's the point? Also was looking at Windsor and Newton Conserv-art varnish and am wondering if that will say the same--that it must first have an isolation coat. I hate glossiness, even hate oil paintings varnished so I didn't want to pile on a lot of finish. Somebody mentioned Final Coat that's rubbed on with cloth--is this a good one to use? Thanks!

Katie, here is a link to Final Coat Product Literature:
http://www.viavon.com/seminars/spc/finalcoatproductinfo.html

It doesn't say exactly about using it over acrylic paintings but I have used it for several years on my acrylic canvas paintings and I love it. It comes in gloss or low gloss. It seems that you can use it on anything. You can even use it over Genesis Heat Set Oils.

Katie D
04-14-2007, 08:11 PM
Thanks Einion and Quwatha,
I got really pressed to place and order earlier because I need the canvasses asap and settled on Windsor and Newton Galeria matte varnish and a good varnishing brush. I really appreciate your help!

KachinaBlue
01-08-2008, 02:42 PM
The best thing you can do for acrylic paintings is to put gloss acrylic varnish on, wait a few days and use Soluvar. You can mix it to any degree of sheen, just make sure to stir the matte stuff up good. Gloss acrylic varnish protects the painting. A brat took a pencil to a big acrylic painting of mine at a gallery in Sedona, Arizona and except for the gloss varnish protection the painting would have been ruined. It was not an easy job to remove the Soluvar, but it can be done if you do it in small sections at a time or have several people working on it. For a painting up to two or three feet or so in either direction, it's easy to remove the Soluvar. I put new Soluvar on that painting and it was like new and sold it for thousands of dollars and all great art museums use the stuff. Hurrying to get paintings out of the studio is dangerous. Believe me, I know and I've tried every way of varnishing I can think of over acrylic paintings. Including using a compressor and airgun. You can put Soluvar on really thick, but you can also brush several coats on if you are careful, or you can spray it on. As many coats as you wish, but one really thick coat with a brush works good for me. There's nothing like it.