PDA

View Full Version : olvidado en su soledad (Compromised Dreams series)


earnest_ward
04-12-2007, 05:51 PM
Hi Everyone,

This piece is the penultimate in the series. It marks the low point in the individual's experience -- lost and alone in isolation, his personal identity all but gone, and unaware of any way out (there is though.)

This work measures 60"x60" and I hope you fine it to yor liking. 2007 Earnest Ward.

Cheers! :wave:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Apr-2007/101693-CompDreams5_med.jpg

TxAggieDarlin
04-12-2007, 06:00 PM
WOW. This is amazing and beautiful. It is very different and I would never have thought of it, but you are doing fantastic. That cloth had to be a nightmare to do. I just keep staring at it. Great coloring.

earnest_ward
04-12-2007, 06:20 PM
WOW. This is amazing and beautiful. It is very different and I would never have thought of it, but you are doing fantastic. That cloth had to be a nightmare to do. I just keep staring at it. Great coloring.

Hi Tex,

Glad you like the work. (I must admit that sometimes when I'm working I can obsess on the details... and I love every minute of it! :D )

On an unrelated subject, the weather's been unseasonably cold and now wet up here (the coldest April in over 100 years thus far) and we've really been missing Texas and the Hill Country wildflowers. :( Are you getting much "color" around College Station?

Katie D
04-12-2007, 07:21 PM
Wonderful right down to the shadow. I love high concept pieces, and you've executed it so well.

C_Line
04-12-2007, 07:49 PM
Truly a captivating piece - masterfully executed. Thank you for sharing.

dreamz
04-12-2007, 08:38 PM
I doubt I would make the connection between the work and your symbolism by looking at the piece, perhaps in context with its series mates it would be different. That being said...

I really like the background. The main figure itself, I have to agree with TxAggie looks like it was a real nightmare to do! Over all a very intriquing piece even at the scale we can view it at, Im sure IRL its very captivating

Phantelope
04-12-2007, 11:10 PM
an other great one, I really like this series. Are you at all influenced by Gottfried Helnwein? (http://www.helnwein.com

He did some work that comes to mind looking at your's. Though his stuff is gigantic, the size really blew me away once I saw them. Not very useful though, who has 20 ft walls?

I'd love to see a photo will all of these next to each other! Haunting and thought provoking, I'd love to have them all!

Oliver

earnest_ward
04-13-2007, 12:19 AM
an other great one, I really like this series. Are you at all influenced by Gottfried Helnwein? (http://www.helnwein.com

He did some work that comes to mind looking at your's. Though his stuff is gigantic, the size really blew me away once I saw them. Not very useful though, who has 20 ft walls?

I'd love to see a photo will all of these next to each other! Haunting and thought provoking, I'd love to have them all!

Oliver

Hi Oliver,

Thanks for the favorable comments.

No, I can't say that I've been influenced by Helnwein although his big heads are interesting and I wouldn't mind a studio in Ireland like his. (Chuck Close, however, has influenced my work to some degree and my classroom instruction even more so.)

I do plead guilty to painting large pix though. Some of the Dancer Series polyptychs I've posted on the Figure forum run 10-14 feet high.

id-art
04-13-2007, 01:54 AM
Interesting. Great website, too.

Finzy
04-13-2007, 03:51 AM
Thought provoking, very well done!
Finzy

sp00ky2002
04-13-2007, 05:03 AM
I'm absolutely in awe here - amazing detail and very striking painting... I've seen some of the others in the series you have posted and was equally impressed by those....

Are you going to post up a collective image showing all the pieces in place? (please)

earnest_ward
04-13-2007, 08:44 AM
I'm absolutely in awe here - amazing detail and very striking painting... I've seen some of the others in the series you have posted and was equally impressed by those....

Are you going to post up a collective image showing all the pieces in place? (please)

Hi Neil,

I'm very glad you're pleased with the work. I may do that (a collective) when I unveil the final piece in the series (currently a WIP) IF I can figure out how to do that. OR I may find a gallery in Mersey Side (my wife's family is from Liverpool and north Wales) willing to exhibit the series and you could see it in person there. :lol:

Cheers! :thumbsup:

idcrisis55
04-13-2007, 08:51 AM
Love the play of warm and cool and your lighting is superb.

TheRaven
04-13-2007, 11:18 AM
Fantastico!

Phantelope
04-13-2007, 01:15 PM
you paintings are quite big, very impressive! I'd love to have some room where I could go that large.

Would be great to see the entire series once it is finished, if you even can get them all on one photo!

Thanks for sharing,

Oliver

Jon
04-13-2007, 02:13 PM
Intriguing work.
Approximately how long did this piece take you to complete?

earnest_ward
04-13-2007, 03:34 PM
Intriguing work.
Approximately how long did this piece take you to complete?

About three weeks on the calendar.

Selahs art
04-13-2007, 03:36 PM
Thought provoking, very well done!
Finzy

I agree
good work on the material.

Retha:clap:

tonyjazz
04-14-2007, 12:59 AM
Da-vinci used to throw a piece of cloth on a chair on paint it to study shadows and depth. You have managed to do this with the bandaged man. Masterful artwork.

earnest_ward
04-14-2007, 09:21 AM
Da-vinci used to throw a piece of cloth on a chair on paint it to study shadows and depth. You have managed to do this with the bandaged man. Masterful artwork.

Hi Tony,

Yes, you're right. And another common practice in Renaissance studios was to dip a piece of cloth in plaster, drape it across a model's legs until it hardened, and then use it as a drawing subject for young apprentices in training. (They not only learned to draw the fabric but also the form of the sitter's legs beneath the fabric.) Today Golden Acrylic Colors manufactures an excellent acrylic substitute for the plaster.

Oh, drawing Roman sculptures at your local museum will do the job too. :thumbsup:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Apr-2007/101693-drape_med.jpg

Happy painting! :wave:

CamiTampa
04-15-2007, 01:58 AM
I don't understand it, but I do like it.

Cami

earnest_ward
04-15-2007, 02:09 PM
I don't understand it, but I do like it.

Cami

Hi Cami,

Thanks. Actually, as an artist I think I would much prefer that my audience be intrigued by my work than understand it. (I think that, as humans, we are fascinated by a puzzle or mystery and will return to that over and over again. But, once we've solved the puzzle, we move on to the new and unknown.) I also like to leave enough "room" in my paintings for the "baggage" that each viewer brings to the work.