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Old Tex
04-02-2007, 01:47 PM
Did this over the weekend. Trying to get a little more color into my work.
Comments are always welcome.

Gouache 5/7
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Apr-2007/100938-Wooden_Bridge.jpg

meglyman
04-02-2007, 07:29 PM
Ralph,

I like what you've done with the color! Too bad I can't see more of the sky, because its color is beautiful. I like the light shining on the trees in the background.

I assume there's a waterfall on the far side of the bridge? I ask because the blue of the water ends in a very straight line.

I only have a couple suggestions. The dark line along the path on the right side is supposed to be a tree's shadow, right? The line works well in the composition but I had a hard time identifying what it was, at first. Also, you could add a bit of variation in the water's color to indicate small waves. I'm sure the water could be that flat, but it looks a little unnatural to me.

The bridge itself looks really good. I like how I can see the light on the right side but not on the left. Reminds me of a morning stroll through the park. :) I hope you continue to explore the colors - I think this one turned out really well. I love the light blue of the water and the dash of red along the bank.

Meg

Cerulean_bleu
04-03-2007, 01:08 AM
I see all that Meg noted. Yet I noticed nothing except I wanted to suggest you take a fan brush and give your tree, bridge, and boulders reflections in the water- and the water itself- just a bit of ripple. So that it denotes movent. However, I do find the water lovely as it is. And it has more an abstract look as is.

I feel tension in that the bridge doesn't seem anchored. Did you do this on purpose? And the tree shadows go all kinds of ways; the light must have been crazy that day. The background is beautiful. I just find this a beautiful painting.

Old Tex
04-03-2007, 01:31 PM
Meg and Kay, all very good observations and comments! I really appreciate it. When you work with a picture, you become so familiar with it that you know exactly what you're looking at, forgetting that a viewer of the finished piece doesn't have the advantage of having studied the original subject. You don't really see ambiguities anymore, because you came to understand the scene while portraying it. Learning to see my work from a viewer's viewpoint is, I suppose, part of the challenge.

Thank you both so much for taking the time to look, to study and to share your comments. I consider it part of my learning process. Thanks!