PDA

View Full Version : Winter Wonderland


Marc Hanson
03-02-2007, 10:11 PM
This is based on a 6x8 oil field study done from my cars' front seat a few weeks ago. I'll photo the study tomorrow and post it, but for now here's the pastel on white professional grade Wallis mounted on board.

Winter Wonderland, 11x14
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Mar-2007/37743-Winter-Wonderland.jpg

Detail
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Mar-2007/37743-Winter-Wonderland-detail.jpg

Kathryn Wilson
03-02-2007, 10:37 PM
It's gobsmacking gorgeous! Forever a fan of your work - I love the turquoises and yellows, perfect for a snowy painting.

CindyW
03-02-2007, 10:43 PM
Oh, and it IS a winter wonderland!
Roads like this bring me back to my youth....traveling back roads, summer and winter...the less traveled road. You might see a deer or find tracks to identify.
The time of day here is perfect to convey that time long ago for me.
Love the road that hides the destination and the trees that melt into the sky. The darkness of those majestic trees gives the painting much strength as well as showing their strength.
Beautiful beautiful work.
Cindy

Sunflwr1
03-02-2007, 10:58 PM
Hi Marc!

Was so excited to see you posting here in the Pastel Forum. Sure do love this one... especially the sun light spilling across the road. Did you use the "Viva Wash" on this one? Can hardly wait for Traverse City!

David Patterson
03-02-2007, 11:13 PM
Wonderful painting Mark. I just love your work!

David

JON805
03-03-2007, 12:24 AM
You are the MAN Marc, well done. Thanks for sharing this painting with us.

DebbieGS
03-03-2007, 08:03 AM
Beautiful! Your work is stunning!

Marc Hanson
03-03-2007, 08:04 AM
Thank you all for your comments. It's appreciated. Marcia, this is some older Wallis from a roll I have still, so yes, the 'viva wash' was used. Can't do it on the newer paper or you loose the pastel in a cloud of dust.

I should have made a disclaimer about the photo of this. It's slightly more chromatic than the original, and the darks are slightly more contrasting and dark. I looked at it on anohter monitor and it looks really off, but on my iMac it looks pretty close. FYI

Marc Hanson
03-03-2007, 09:14 AM
Here's a photo that is closer to real life. It's a little less contrasting and looks more correct.
And the truth is probably somewhere inbetween!!! :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Mar-2007/37743-Winter-Wonderland-for-web.jpg

This is the 6"x8" oil study from life that the pastel was painted from, no photo reference used. I find this the most interesting and creative way for me to paint in the studio. To rely on memory and from a study done on site is it for me.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Mar-2007/37743-Winter-Wonderland-sketch.jpg

Donna T
03-03-2007, 09:18 AM
Thanks so much for sharing this with us! I really admire your work and this one is outstanding!

Donna T

dbjs
03-03-2007, 10:09 AM
This is very beautifull work!!

coh
03-03-2007, 10:13 AM
Thank you all for your comments. It's appreciated. Marcia, this is some older Wallis from a roll I have still, so yes, the 'viva wash' was used. Can't do it on the newer paper or you loose the pastel in a cloud of dust.

Nice work on both. The hints of warmth in the clouds are nicely stated. I like
the addition of the light on the distant trees in the pastel compared to the
oil study.

Question about the "viva wash", I remember you mentioning that technique
in the past...but what you are saying implies there has been some change
in the characteristics of the Wallis paper. Can you elaborate on that? Have
they reformulated it? I've only been using it for a short time, but I've noticed
lately that when I try to use paper towel or even a brush to blend/smooth
out the pastel, most of it just comes off unless I use a REALLY delicate
touch. Is that what you're referring to? Did it use to behave differently?

Marc Hanson
03-03-2007, 10:29 AM
Nice work on both. The hints of warmth in the clouds are nicely stated. I like
the addition of the light on the distant trees in the pastel compared to the
oil study.

Question about the "viva wash", I remember you mentioning that technique
in the past...but what you are saying implies there has been some change
in the characteristics of the Wallis paper. Can you elaborate on that? Have
they reformulated it? I've only been using it for a short time, but I've noticed
lately that when I try to use paper towel or even a brush to blend/smooth
out the pastel, most of it just comes off unless I use a REALLY delicate
touch. Is that what you're referring to? Did it use to behave differently?
Thanks Chris.
Yes....:)

bluefish
03-03-2007, 10:55 AM
Marc:

Another beautiful painting - I love the depth of color in the trees and foreground. Thank you for sharing with us -

you stated that it is done on Wallis mounted on board - how do you mount it and what type of board do you use? Thanking you in advance for your comments............'bluefish'

chewie
03-03-2007, 11:00 AM
I find this the most interesting and creative way for me to paint in the studio. To rely on memory and from a study done on site is it for me.

why does this work so well for you? obviously, it certainly does, seeing a post by you is always fun, and you didn't disappoint this time either.

i ask b/c using photos in the last few months, after a summer of plein air, has been less than exciting. but, we can't even get our vehicles out of the sheds right now, no way am i painting outside today, with the car or not! so, i must find another way to wokr in the studio that is more fulfilling, and what you said here intriques me. if possible, elaborate?

love your work, the edges, the colors. mmmm!!

Marc Hanson
03-03-2007, 12:05 PM
why does this work so well for you? obviously, it certainly does, seeing a post by you is always fun, and you didn't disappoint this time either.

i ask b/c using photos in the last few months, after a summer of plein air, has been less than exciting. but, we can't even get our vehicles out of the sheds right now, no way am i painting outside today, with the car or not! so, i must find another way to wokr in the studio that is more fulfilling, and what you said here intriques me. if possible, elaborate?

love your work, the edges, the colors. mmmm!!
Hi chewie ;-),

Thank you.

I'm with you on the working only from the photos. I don't have anything against it ethically, and do that often. But as you've discovered, after working from life all summer and then going into the studio to work from 'non life', you understand better what it is you are missing by not working from life. So you spend most of the time trying to solve what's wrong in the photo because you know, from the life work, that the photo is lieing like a dog to you!!! :)

I have found it to be more fullfilling to me to stay away from the photos if at all possible (and it's not always possible to do) in the studio and to use the information that the studies give me, and my memory of that situation, to work from. What I find is that my 'artisitic' sense kicks in and guides me through the process instead of my 'rendering' sensibility that seems to take over if using the photo reference. With the study there is a limited amount of detail, the color is more accurate (even if not considered a real good study), and the perspective is probably more accurate. Not having the photo (with all of it's misleading information) detail to get in the way, I find that I develop a painting with more energy and emotion than when from a photo.

A thing to remember when working in the studio from any sort of reference, even a field study. You shouldn't (I don't think) be copying the source no matter what it is....including on site. You should be making a statement about YOU and how YOU FEEL about the subject. The studio enlargement of either a study or a photo should be about the NEW painting, not the source. Let the studio piece grow and change on it's own. It's darn near impossible to go from a 6x8 to a 24x30 inch painting and repeat the 1/2" long stroke of yellow on the 6x8 that said it ALL on the 24x30 with the same impact. On the 24x30 you have to deal with the area of the 1/2" stroke that is now 4 times as large. You can't just use a brush that is 4x's bigger, make a stroke that is 4x's longer and wider and be successful often. On the larger painting that area might be open for a completely new sort of development on it's own terms and should be dealt with that way.

In my classes on this topic, I have people take the studies, photos or whatever, and start with B&W value 'constructions' of what the desired new painting will be. From there we go to color comps, also small studies of the compositional shapes. Several of them to explore ideas. From there a 1/2 scale sketch (in the case of the 24x30 a 12x15), and then the large painting. This sounds like it would drive you into another hobby or profession by then. Just the opposite happens. You become so familiar with your 'concept' (the most important thing to consider in any painting) that by the time you're stretching up the large canvas, or taping up the full sheet of pastel paper, you can hardly wait to get into the process.

I think that what you are bringing up is more related to our lack of ....I hate to use the word.... "Inspiration", or enthusiasm that working in the studio provides. So we need to build that enthusiasm for what we're doing.

I do that by remembering that the goal is not copying Mother Nature or the photo. The goal is to make a meaningful statement about how "I" see the world. The world according to Marc, or chewie, or whoever......;-)

bnoonan
03-03-2007, 01:08 PM
I want to paint like this when I grow up!!!! You are absolutely right about painting from life - it just glows in this piece.

gotta go back and take a closer look - Outstanding! Barb

Tom Christopher
03-04-2007, 12:02 PM
Hey- Marc- great to see you are still painting with pastels --this one is stunning as usual.. I have been checking your website regularly for new stuff- .. keeping track of your workshop locations---I hope to attend another in the near future..Tom

Merethe T
03-04-2007, 12:51 PM
Oh wow, absolutely brilliant! Barb took the words out of my mouth - this is how I wanna learn to paint landscapes! Thank you for sharing your thoughts too, very helpfull! :)

Kathryn Wilson
03-04-2007, 01:04 PM
I do that by remembering that the goal is not copying Mother Nature or the photo. The goal is to make a meaningful statement about how "I" see the world.

Boy, do I agree with that! I think the evolution of an artist will contain that understanding. The more I paint, the more the paintings are about "my" seeing the world, than the actual plein air scene or the photo.

alicat
03-04-2007, 10:21 PM
Beautiful work, gorgeous light and colours. :clap:

nana b
03-04-2007, 10:52 PM
Marc, your 'Winter Wonderland' is absolutely beautiful. I love all your other works also.

nana b