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View Full Version : Casting Nasturtiums WIP and Demo thread - Watercolour


maritajill
11-27-2006, 04:48 AM
This is a read-only thread, to see the original, click here. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=384856)


Here is another watercolour using the method of the landscapes I did on Friday. I thought the lines on the nasturtium leaves lent to it really well. Started this yesterday (Sunday) - it's been wonderful to have such a long weekend when I've been free to paint :thumbsup:

Helen asked how I worked. :wave: .... so I decided to make a quarter sheet, larger than I have before to slow me down..

First I needed a linear drawing of each area of colour, not too big as each will have a miniature wet in wet blob created inside it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Nov-2006/44433-drawing.jpg

Then the fun begins. :p

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Nov-2006/44433-nast1.jpg

This was it after another hour or so.
I found I was working on areas that were similar colours across the image.

Each section is painted really wet and left to dry so a hard edge happens around the shape. Into the wet area I used another brush to introduce another colour to mix wet in wet. Small slips of dry paper are left, where the pencil marks are.

Hard edges show up best on a hot pressed paper. I'm using a Khadi paper, which has a wonderful surface, tho not uniform.

maritajill
11-27-2006, 07:28 AM
Hi Dewi, Jane and Connie :wave:

I tried to photograph my hand working on this to show what exciting things happen when adding a second colour to the first, but realized the beauty is in movement as the colour shoots across the surface.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Nov-2006/44433-nast_brush.jpg
I have also found cadmiums don't, they crawl :p

This is where it's at after another hour plus:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Nov-2006/44433-nast2.jpg

Comments are welcomed.
I have found I'm working so carefully I've had very few 'breakthroughs' unlike the small images I did on Friday :p

maritajill
11-27-2006, 08:59 AM
Marita - have you tried inks with this method?
Works really well!
The colour combos here are lovely - 'twill be really exciting when you get those hotter flower colours added. Oooh! Luverly :D
Thanks for doing the WIP

Yes! I did have a go with FW acrylic inks -
greens into scarlet - yummy :D
But I wanted to find out how my watercolours reacted.
I have to practice a lot to keep up with my students :p

I've been saving the reds and yellows till I knew what they had to sing against - so, here we go:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Nov-2006/44433-nast_cu.jpg

Its difficult to get the cadmium reds strong without going thick, I'm using cad red and orange, scarlet lake, quin. red and magenta. Not a restricted palette this time.

maritajill
11-27-2006, 05:02 PM
Hi Elain - your ref was fine for this size!
Hi Li and Barbara - you're just in time for the update :wave:

This took much longer than I expected, but all the shapes are filled
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Nov-2006/44433-nast3.jpg

Compared with the photograph I expect there are loads of anomalies :p
But it was fun to do.

As long as you work flat the paint dries evenly - probably a lot faster if the weather were warmer. In fact this would be a great way to do wet in wet in hot dry weather!

maritajill
11-28-2006, 07:59 AM
It's funny, when I was silk painting a lot, I absolutely HATED the white lines from the resist but here it is really beautiful. Very jewel/ mosiac like and love all the abstract shapes. Thanks for the demo Marita!:clap: :clap: :clap: ( Forgot to ask, do you erase the pencil lines when it's finished?)

Li

I think you have to pick the subject where the lines enhance the composition Li:)

I'm not sure about erasing the lines.
I haven't on this one yet, but on the smaller ones I did.
I'm a bit apprehensive as this paper has a fragile surface and could be scuffed if I wasn't careful.

I forgot to say: If you're patient enough :angel: - or live in a hot dry place! - you can paint right up to the line and leave out the bridges. This involves careful planning and a lot of waiting for pieces to dry, but it gives a strong dark line around each shape.