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Anuran
02-08-2007, 08:28 PM
Just a heads up for any folks who might want to know...I am currently taking a color theory course. We are using acrylics to go through all of the usual excercises and also Itten's book. Anyway I was using Winsor Newton Finity acrylics and the Quinacridone Red doesn't resemble the same color from other manufacturers. Now, I'll admit I am judging this from only one tube of that color which may have been fluke but, as far as I am concerned consistency is a damn important selling point. After it skewed some colors in my project the professor caught it and compared/examined the tube and requested that I buy a different brand.

Nitsa
02-08-2007, 09:23 PM
Anuran, I paint by the seat of my pants so things like this always feel as though they should be important to me even though they are quite honestly not :o
However, thankyou for sharing your new found information here, that's what WC is all about. :thumbsup:

idylbrush
02-08-2007, 09:25 PM
"Help! I am an art student and am badly in need of the following: harsh critiques, instruction, and sound advice."

Dang, you left out verbal abuse and the daily beating part as well.

There are some variances from house to house when it comes to pigment, some are quite proprietary about their formulas and such and they don't always play well together. So, it would be consistent that they aren't all the same. Eventually you will find the ones that work best in your world and if it feels good stay there.

Anuran
02-09-2007, 12:11 AM
I hear what you guys are saying.....Although, I haven't become this intimate and comfortable with any type of paint yet, I believe that as a creature of habit I will develop a palette that works for me and stay reasonably faithful to it. That's my plan anyway, unless I find it creatively stifling. Verbal abuse? Daily beatings? :) Hey man, I just got out of the Air Force, the tone is the same but the language is actually a bit nicer!

Swaggertoes
02-09-2007, 01:25 AM
Sometimes the switch from brand to brand has proven to be a bit of an issue....especially if I start a painting, then come back to it much later and I can't match color....sometimes it's because of the paint.

lightfast
02-09-2007, 02:22 AM
Just a heads up for any folks who might want to know...I am currently taking a color theory course. We are using acrylics to go through all of the usual excercises and also Itten's book. Anyway I was using Winsor Newton Finity acrylics and the Quinacridone Red doesn't resemble the same color from other manufacturers. Now, I'll admit I am judging this from only one tube of that color which may have been fluke but, as far as I am concerned consistency is a damn important selling point. After it skewed some colors in my project the professor caught it and compared/examined the tube and requested that I buy a different brand.

it's easy to confuse the marketing name of the paint with the actual pigment used.

finity 'quinacridone red' is made with pigment pr209. for example golden markets a paint with the same name but it is made with pv19, a different pigment.

as quinacridone red is not a specific color with standard hue, value and chroma the paint manufacturers can use any pigments they like and call the result whatever they think will help sell more paint.

Richard Saylor
02-09-2007, 03:08 AM
...finity 'quinacridone red' is made with pigment pr209. for example golden markets a paint with the same name but it is made with pv19, a different pigment...Yes. Golden quin. red (PV19) is a very cool red, similar to what is called quin. rose by other manufacturers. Finity quin. red (PR209) is warmer, closer to a middle red.

Richard

Donna A
02-09-2007, 04:13 AM
Sometimes the switch from brand to brand has proven to be a bit of an issue....especially if I start a painting, then come back to it much later and I can't match color....sometimes it's because of the paint.

Yep! I learned forever ago that when considering , let's say, Green Earth----I needed to think of it in terms of Old Holland Green Earth or Such-and-Such Green Earth, etc. Each brand "sees" the pigment's color as something very independently. There have been particular pigments I liked using were on my palette from two different brands---and I considered them very different colors, even tho the "name" was the same (and I'm talking about the times when we did not have the humongous [and usually lovely] collection of synthetic pigments we have now.) Just as with my food, I want to read the label when considering a tube of paint---or a pigment. And even the "actual" pigment will vary from the supplier which each brand uses.

Experimenting----and our shared hope that consitency will prevail! Best wishes! Donna ;-}

Nitsa
02-09-2007, 05:55 AM
Verbal abuse? Daily beatings? Hey man, I just got out of the Air Force, the tone is the same but the language is actually a bit nicer!

Great sense of humour...You made me laugh out loud! :lol:

timelady
02-09-2007, 10:50 AM
Yup, you need to check the exact pigment number and get a brand with the same one your teacher wants you to use. :)

Tina.

Einion
02-09-2007, 11:43 AM
Lots of good info above, just wanted to add a few things.

First, obviously, the name on the tube can't be used as a firm guide to colour since it can be picked by the paintmaker merely to sound attractive to buyers.

Second, even with the 'same' pigment you can get some variation from maker to maker. Some pigment names (e.g. PR108, PB15) span a huge range of hues, with cadmium reds for example all the way from a vivid scarlet through middle red to dark, dull, maroons.

And on top of this, sometimes two paints that look similar in masstone can behave slightly differently in mixtures - some version of Cadmium Orange for example can make pinkish tints with white, while others tint as you'd expect, something more like salmon through to magnolia*.

*Common wall colour in the UK.

Einion

Paulafv
02-11-2007, 02:13 PM
Magnolia walls, eh. Then it's not the weather that drives so many UK folk to paint their beautiful, grey foggy wet skies; it's an antidote to the magnolia walls.

Such fun. Back to caulking the tub and laying yet another layer of joint compound. Reminds me of painting once I got the "rythym" of it. Contractor didn't want to travel between layers drying, so I said, brightly (stupidly): I can do that!