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NYIllustrator
04-16-2002, 05:22 PM
What is the best paper to use for a lino print? Im new to printmaking and thought it would be the next logical step from the scratchboard I do. I tried using a paper with a tooth on a lino cut awhile ago, but it didn't pick up the ink well.

sassybird
04-17-2002, 12:28 PM
It depends on whether you are hand rubbing, or putting it through a press. I have always preferred Rieves BFK Heavyweight for my lino cuts.

NYIllustrator
04-17-2002, 03:47 PM
I am hand rolling it. I was wondering though, Ive seen people who do a lino over a monoprint. What exactly is a monoprint? I saw that one guy did a landscape monoprint, but the lino over the monoprint i saw, looked like the monoprint in the backround were washes of color, like watercolour almost. Also is it better to use a bayer for lino or speedball tools? Sorry I have all these questions, but Im interested in getting into this and totally lost where to start.

NYIllustrator
04-17-2002, 04:00 PM
ok this was the person Im talking about. The girls dress is the monoprint on paper and than the black lino cut went over it. Im wondering how to do that type of monoprint. Any tips that you may have to guide me to how this style is done is appreciated.

http://www.salon.com/weekly/jetter.gif

Gisela
04-17-2002, 11:37 PM
Originally posted by NYIllustrator
What exactly is a monoprint...

...Also is it better to use a bayer for lino or speedball tools?


Timelady did a mini-lesson on monotype here ;
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=25505

Here's an online video of the process ; (kind of cool)
http://nmaa-ryder.si.edu/collections/exhibits/monotypes/video.html

If you'd like to learn more about the many possiblities, check out Julia Ayers book, 'Monotype- Mediums and Methods for Painterly Printmaking' -- lots and lots of good info there!

Just to clarify a little bit -- a brayer is the name for the roller used to roll the ink onto the lino. Speedball brand tools are fine for starting out. I have some better tools now, but still use the old Speedball too. You can experiment and use whatever makes the marks that you like. :cool:

Gisela

Gisela
04-17-2002, 11:46 PM
Oh yeah...paper!

I'm really hooked on Japanese papers for relief printing. I use heavier printmaking paper for multiple color reliefs, but only because the paper has to take a bit more abuse. ;)

You can get a little booklet from Rembrant Graphic that has all the printmaking papers they carry. Each piece is just 4 x 7, but you can get a feel for all the different papers.
I made a little-bitty lino-cut (3 x 3) and tested the papers in the booklet to see what I liked.

Gisela

NYIllustrator
04-17-2002, 11:49 PM
thanks for all the help. Do you use the sppedball ink in the tubes as well? Also did you click the image link, I was wondering how that was done.

Gisela
04-18-2002, 12:05 AM
I used Speedball ink for quite a while. Sassy just turned me on to Graphic Chemical inks and I like that MUCH better!
(Thanks Sassy!)

I looked at your link -- very nice work -- reminds me of AmyH
somehow. ;)

Here's my guess at how that might have been done. The artist prolly did a pencil sketch first. He/she prolly transfered that to lino to see where to do the cutting.
Then, when doing the monotype, he/she simply placed the oringinal drawing (that was used to transfer to the lino) under the glass or acetate and painted the part that was to be transferred to paper.
Registration would have to be pretty accurate in that case.

Hope that helps.:)

Gisela

NYIllustrator
04-18-2002, 12:08 AM
thanks for all your help.

timelady
04-18-2002, 01:38 PM
For hand-rubbing I used two kinds of paper. Either a japanese paper, which is looovely to work with. :) Or something without a lot of tooth - my usual was a Fabriano paper. Because I liked my image to be quite solid and dark I also sanded the surface of the lino lightly with a fine sandpaper, like glass paper. And I would lightly mist the paper with water (blotting it if it looked "shiney" at all - too wet).

I personally don't like the speedball inks. Something about the stickiness of them. Ick. I switched to another brand of relief print inks, but they're made locally. (oil based of course!)

Tina.

NYIllustrator
04-18-2002, 04:45 PM
well I got all my supplies, so ill let you know how it turns out. Unfortunatley I got water based speedball ink, is oil better? Also can i heat the lino in the stove or microwave to make it softer? also you suggest misting the paper?