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graphicdiva
12-28-2005, 04:11 PM
Hi everyone I hope you all had a wonderful holiday:wave:

I recieved a new printer for christmas from my boyfriend. It is a Canon i9900 large format 8 colour printer. I also have the smaller version i960, which I love. the colours are bang on and the resolution awesome. I have gone through the CP library and there isn't a lot about printing from desktop printers. I did however, read that some people print on Arches 140 pnd hot press paper and I was wondering if anyone here had experiance in printing their artwork themselves and what kind of paper they liked or didn't like. I want my coloured pencil and graphite to look as close to the originals as possible....
Thanks a bunch and happy new year!
Christina

Dave F
12-28-2005, 08:19 PM
Hi Christina,
I have recently asked similar questions. I asked art supply stores, office supply stores, and finally photography stores. I had no luck with the first two. In fact I was met with blank stares and lots of ummm's and duhhhh's. The professional photography stores actually had alot of good info. They recomended a few fine art papers that are specially finished for ink jet printers. They come in different finishes and weights and sizes up to 13 x 19. (Some are also available on 24 or 36 inch rolls if your printer can handle rolls that large) I then researched these on line. When I found some that I liked, I went back to the store and bought a selection of some of them. I'm away from my office right now so I can't tell you the exact names, but when I get back I'll update this note. The paper texture is heavy and looks like a professional fine art print. I must say that the results are excelent! I can't tell a difference between a professional giclee and my own prints. Of course the printer will make a difference also. I use an HP wide format printer. Your printer should be great also. I've heard good things about that printer. I hope This helps.
Dave

Meisie
12-28-2005, 11:55 PM
ooooooh! Are you going to sell prints Christina?

I'm just tagging along this thread for the info, can't help I'm afraid ;)

Meisie

Dave F
12-29-2005, 04:00 AM
OK here's the update. Some of the papers that I tried are:

Ilford Inkjet Fine Art Paper. It is the matte finish and it is 100% rag & acid free. Coated on one side for inkjet printers.

Legion Paper Somerset Photo Enhanced. It is 100% cotton, acid free, velvet finish and museum quality. I really like this paper, but it is a bit expensive. I use this for the good stuff only.

Epson Professional Media Matte Paper-Heavyweight. This is relatively inexpensive and a good all around paper. I don't know if it is 100% acid free or not. My best guess is that it probably is acid free.

Arches Infinity. I think that it comes in cold press and hot press. I haven't tried this one yet. It is supposed to be the same Arches watercolor paper that we all know but it is treated to work well in all inkjet printers. They advertise that their paper is 100% acid free and museum quality. I really want to try this one but I can only find it online. I just need to order some.

There are a few more that I haven't tried yet. I encourage you to try them on your printer to see how they work. Many paper companys will even offer small sample packs for a nominal cost. I hope this is more clear and I have been of some assistance.

Dave F

Paapu
12-29-2005, 01:04 PM
This is a thread I found in the CP library.. I don't have knowledge either.. hopefully this might have some input..:)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=69696

graphicdiva
12-29-2005, 02:43 PM
Dave- YOU ROCK!!! Thanks for all the wonderful info!
My next question to you is what were you printing?Was it coloured pencil?Do you print graphite drawings as well and do you have a preference as to which paper you use for colourd pencil and graphite....do you use different papers for different works?
I will probably have to order online since I am in canada.Asking for a sample pack from these companies is a great idea as well. Thanks again for taking the time to pass on all this information I greatly appreciate it:
Paapu-thankyou for posting the link, that is the one I read as well but it mostly talks about epson printers and I have a canon. Apparently Canon and HP printers are way more forgiving. you can put different types of papers in them from other companies where if you have an Epson you have to use their papers only...
I just want to get printing so bad!
charne-hi there!Glad to have you tagging along! and yes I am planning on selling prints. Did you have a good holiday?

Meisie
12-29-2005, 04:45 PM
Busy holidays but good, yes thanks! :) lmk know prices when you start printing ok? I'm going to have to sell something soon! lol, I also want one of Nicole's prints! :D

Meisie

Dave F
12-30-2005, 12:28 PM
Yes, Christine, I do use different paper for cp & graphite. All the papers I've already mentioned work well for printing my cp prints. For graphite, I actually found a sketch paper that is VERY inexpensive. It is called Robert Bateman (named after the famous wildlife artist. He endorses the paper and signs his name to the pad of paper.) I don't remember who makes it. I will have to get back to on that. I tried it by accident and found that with my printer it works very well. It is a spiral bound pad of paper so it takes more prep time because you have to cut the spiral holes off of the paper. It comes in various sizes. It is made of recycled paper, but it is 100% acid free. Printing color on this did not work as well.

Making your own prints boils down to this: Finding what papers are easily available in your area, what papers work best in your printer, how much you are willing to spend to produce them. Just remember what works for one person may not work for everyone. Hopefully this will get you started in the right direction. The best way is to test them yourself. Let me know what works best for you.

Dave F

graphicdiva
12-30-2005, 01:18 PM
hey does the pad of Robert Bateman sketch paper have four quick sketches of a mountain goat on the front? I have a pad of it sitting right next to my computer. I also tried stonehege paper and it printed really well. the piece I had was off white and had a tint of yellow in it so it printed a tad green but I think this paper comes in a bright white so that should work even better....
what setting do you use to print at? I used a matte photo paper setting so I would get a little better resolution than using regular typing paper but it wouldn't totally satutate the paper like it would if printing on glossy paper.
I am extremely happy with the print quality from this printer! Dave,do you sign and number the prints coming off of your desktop like commercial prints?
Thanks again for all your help!
Christina

Meisie
12-30-2005, 01:54 PM
I'm rating this thread! Just too much wonderful info in here to be 'lost' :D

Meisie

BKWYRM
12-30-2005, 02:17 PM
This thread is just chock full of wonderful info! Like Meisie, I'm rating it as well because I would love to see it saved in the Library.

graphicdiva
12-30-2005, 03:45 PM
I'm so glad my little ol' thread is of use to you guys:)
Another thing:When I scan my graphite work I never set the scan to greyscale I leave it on true colour because greyscale only gives you 256 shades of grey. a graphite pencil has more colours in it than just grey...this makes the print look a lot more like the original drawing.I keep my scans (resolution) as high as I can usually 300-400 ppi.
And to save money I always create the artwork to fit a standard frame size this saves me/the buyer a lot of money. I find Ikea has nice looking frames in an assortment of styles at fantastic prices. If you are not near an Ikea Michaels carries a ton of frames and offers coupons at 40% off any item in the store every other week. I also use this coupon to buy the matte boards. I save a ton of money doing it this way.
People really appreciate it when they can just go and buy a frame at a store than having to get their artwork custom framed. We all know how pricey framing can be...

Dave F
12-30-2005, 04:01 PM
I think that is the same pad of paper. I will have to check which settings I use for my graphite settings. I know they are different than my cp settings. HP's settings are different than Cannon, but they probably do similar functions. I haven't done any limited editions yet, so I haven't numbered anything. Everything is open edition so far. I do hand sign each one though. Someday when I do a piece that I really like then I'll do a limited edition print of it.
Dave

Meisie
12-30-2005, 04:52 PM
Would you scan pen & ink as true colour too then? I do, but have not tried printing any, only for my records.

Interesting that Stonehenge prints well. Makes for a nice sturdy print.

Would this be the Bateman paper you're talking about? http://www.currys.com/paper/prodinfo3.asp?SubcatID=4142&catID=7

Meisie

Paapu
12-30-2005, 05:12 PM
Iam rating this too:) thanks for starting this christina and Dave for givin in lots of info:D

graphicdiva
12-31-2005, 01:08 PM
Would you scan pen & ink as true colour too then? I do, but have not tried printing any, only for my records.

Interesting that Stonehenge prints well. Makes for a nice sturdy print.

Would this be the Bateman paper you're talking about? http://www.currys.com/paper/prodinfo3.asp?SubcatID=4142&catID=7

Meisie

Yes I would scan all artwork as true colour because none of it, even pen and ink is ever just black and white.There are alsways different colours of black warm blacks cool blacks etc...and saving them as greyscale loses that.
I was very surprised to see how well the stonehenge printed. Although, I would never use it for colour i tested it and it did not work well for CP prints.
Yes that is the Robert Bateman paper, thanks for posting the link:D

I am going to test a bunch of papers and let you guys know how everything turns out...

HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE!!!!!:wave:

brynmr
12-31-2005, 02:17 PM
Hi Christina. I went the Epson route. I liked the archival pigmented inks they offered. I'm using Eson watercolour paper at the moment which I like a lot but for the big prints (17X...) I'll look for a heavier weight. How are your results so far? Are you happy with the results?

frida
12-31-2005, 03:32 PM
Great thread, everybody! I also rated it... :)

TessDB
01-01-2006, 08:34 AM
:wave: Happy New Year!

Wow, great info! this is one of those things on my do-someday list. And with that in mind, I'm also wondering what type of scanners y'all are using? Or are you photographing your work? Or...?

thanks for all the info. Lot's to think about.
Tess

frida
01-01-2006, 01:55 PM
I have a 5400c HP scanner, and I am not that happy with it, but I am getting better at handling it.

When I am scanning to get an image for the screen, I scan it at the set dpi as a JPG, which is 200. Then I reduce the dpi to 72, make it the size I want and balance the contrast and sharpness if necessary in PHSH.

However, for any future use of images of my work, I do the Master Scan in TIFF format at 300 dpi, which should be the minimum for printing purposes. Those images can be put to many uses, but I didn't make large prints yet.

I only photographed a large one because I didn't want to go through the trouble of stitching it in PHSH, and was eager to post the progress. It is better done with natural light, away from the sun, and have the work perfectly parallel to the camera, to avoid distortions. When you take it all in through the viewer, the margins let you know about it! And better use a tripod...!

This year I hope to reach a level that will justify to have my work photographed by a professional... :cool:

graphicdiva
01-01-2006, 02:32 PM
This year I hope to reach a level that will justify to have my work photographed by a professional... :cool:

I think you have reached that level a long time ago....You need to believe in yourself more:)

TessDB
01-01-2006, 03:30 PM
Raquel, I agree with Christina! You are most certainly there.

About the scanners... I was hoping someone had a review of a larger flat-bed that isn't out-of-this-world expensive. I hate doing multiple scans & putting them together in photoshop. And my photography skills leave a *lot* to be desired...

Tess

graphicdiva
01-01-2006, 04:57 PM
Hi Christina. I went the Epson route. I liked the archival pigmented inks they offered. I'm using Eson watercolour paper at the moment which I like a lot but for the big prints (17X...) I'll look for a heavier weight. How are your results so far? Are you happy with the results?

I was extrememly happy with the results on stonehenge when I printed my graphite work. They look like originals.But I need to shop around and test papers to reproduce my coloured pencil.I used to work in a print shop and we had a large format printer (the Canon CJ 500) it printed giclee prints (nothing like an Iris)and it's dpi was only 1440. the prints I am getting from my printer are a thousand times better. I am so happy with it. I will let you know what does and doesn't work for me when I test other papers.

About the scanners... I was hoping someone had a review of a larger flat-bed that isn't out-of-this-world expensive. I hate doing multiple scans & putting them together in photoshop. And my photography skills leave a *lot* to be desired...

Tess

I'm not sure what larger scanners run at...I must be wierd or something because I LOVE stitching scans together in Photoshop

frida
01-01-2006, 08:29 PM
Thank you Christina and Tess...!

Honestly, I am not fishing for compliments. It's just that I don't produce work regularly, and mainly for that reason I feel I haven't reached "that" special level!