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View Full Version : How to extend Acrylics drying time....


dragonwolf
01-28-2007, 02:53 PM
I was wondering how to extend the drying time of acrylics other then using a retarder. I mean it is an improvement but i was wondering if there was a way to make it last longer then that.

Brent

mollynix
01-28-2007, 04:12 PM
Hi Brent!..in my experince, I find adding blending gel or glazing medium to the paint helps extend drying time..also pre coating your working area with either one of the beforementioned. There is also a palette wetting spray out by Liquitex which is a great help as well. Good luck! Molly

jgary1
01-28-2007, 05:10 PM
Brent: You may want to check out Atelier Interactive artist's acrylics. They are made by an Austrailian firm (Chroma) and have a patented formulation that allows blending as long as the paint is kept wet. Use of their "slow medium" allows the paint to be re-wet, supporting blending of the paint over several days (according to their literature).
G

Costas
02-25-2007, 07:49 PM
Yes!
Dissregard all stuff they sell in the art shops. You must use the retarder the manufacturers use in their formulas. It is called PROPYLENE. I use it for about twenty years now, as I do very large paintings.
Most paint manufacturers approached smartly, will give you some.
Offer a little painting for the office and make friends with the manager.
It's worth, because you will love the stuff, and it is not sold in the shops.
You get my drift?
Here is what I do when I need very extended blending time. I lightly rub the canvas with PROPYLENE, as well as all my prepared paints have a few drops of it. You will think you work in oils. You will have to promise the factory man not to spread it around, otherwise they'll kick you out. Let me know how you go. [email protected]
Good luck
Costas


quote=jgary1]Brent: You may want to check out Atelier Interactive artist's acrylics. They are made by an Austrailian firm (Chroma) and have a patented formulation that allows blending as long as the paint is kept wet. Use of their "slow medium" allows the paint to be re-wet, supporting blending of the paint over several days (according to their literature).
G[/quote]

Dueck
02-25-2007, 11:04 PM
Yes!
Dissregard all stuff they sell in the art shops. You must use the retarder the manufacturers use in their formulas. It is called PROPYLENE. I use it for about twenty years now, as I do very large paintings.
Most paint manufacturers approached smartly, will give you some.
Offer a little painting for the office and make friends with the manager.
It's worth, because you will love the stuff, and it is not sold in the shops.
You get my drift?
Here is what I do when I need very extended blending time. I lightly rub the canvas with PROPYLENE, as well as all my prepared paints have a few drops of it. You will think you work in oils. You will have to promise the factory man not to spread it around, otherwise they'll kick you out. Let me know how you go. [email protected]
Good luck
Costas

http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?from=R40&satitle=propylene+glycol

objectivistartist
02-25-2007, 11:42 PM
Ye might wish to be aware it is listed as a hazardous material --------
http://www.newjersey.gov/health/eoh/rtkweb/1609.pdf

Polygon
02-26-2007, 10:42 AM
Water! Doesn't work of course if you need thick paint, but I have found water (mixed into the paint, I haven't tried spraying yet) to be better than retardant in keeping the paint wet for blending. It works so well I often have to wander off for a few minutes once I'm done blending to wait for it to dry. It depends on your painting technique though as to whether this will be the answer for you, for glazes and blending I find it works great.

Costas
02-26-2007, 06:35 PM
My sincere apologies.
What I meant to suggest was PROPYLENE GLYCOL which the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has classified as "generally recognized as safe" which means that it is acceptable for use in flavorings, drugs, cosmetics, and as a direct food additive.
see further info at http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/tfacts96.html
But of course, we are talking here common sense careful handling anyway don't we?
Again my apologies for the previous suggestion.
Kind regards.
Costas

Phantelope
02-26-2007, 08:48 PM
golden makes a new workable medium, one of which supposedly stays open all day and can be re-whetted the next day. I have yet to try it, it sounds interesting.
The Australian paints are interesting, but I'm not going to replace all my colors, and most of the time I actually want things to dry fast, otherwise I'd just paint with my oils. But there are times where I'd like it open longer. I just got that palette spray from Liquitex and my initial play with it was not too impressive, but that was with a palette full of paint from days before, I'll see how it works on a fresh one.

Now, could somebody shine some more light on this propylene glycol stuff? First time I hear about this, certainly sounds interesting. Is this an archival approach? Any other things to consider?

Curious minds need to know :)