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View Full Version : Need digital camera advice


hawaska
01-14-2007, 11:30 PM
I want to buy a digital camera but am not sure what to get. I saw a Kodak bundle w/ a printer and docking station for like $300, is that any good.

Kallistos
01-15-2007, 03:51 PM
The first thing to do is tell us what your budget is.

The second is to tell us what features you what. How big you want to print the pictures. What you'll be using it for etc.

Personally I wouldn't buy a Kodak digital camera. I also wouldn't spend money on a photo size printer (if that's what it was) and a docking station. My mum bought a kodak bundle (not sure what camera it was, was a few years ago) and it's absolute tripe. The printer only takes special cartridges that also contain the paper - it works out about 0.75 ($1.50) to print a 6x4 photo at home.

If you tell us how much you want to spend and what you want it for we can probably make a much better recommendation as to what would suit you more.

Windy
01-15-2007, 05:12 PM
The other thing about low end Kodak cameras is they are very flimsy, there are a lot more sturdier cameras around.
I agree with what Charlie says we do need more information. Asking about what camera is like asking about cars, there is a huge number out there and they vary in price from the dirt cheap to the super expensive, how much you want to pay depends on your budget and what you are going to use it for (you would not buy a sports car to go off-road trekking usually).

siyenna
01-17-2007, 10:00 AM
Hello, sorry for hijacking your thread, but I,too, am looking to buy a camera and would love any advice anyone could give me. I preferably want a DSLR but dont mind looking at high end compacts either, but most of all want good picture quality, easy to use and fully manual functions as well as automatic. I don't have a huge budget either, about 450-550 (around $900-950 I think) is this at all possible? I currently doing a photography A-level and am progressing from 35mm and the darkroom so I'm not a complete novice, but am new to digital! Thankyou!

Windy
01-17-2007, 06:15 PM
I am not sure of prcies in Britain but have a look at some of the entry level DSLR's (remembering that lenses are the big cost itmes here), you will need to work out what lenses will suit your needs. If you have been using a film SLR I think the prosumer models may frustrate you.
The high end prosumer cameras can offer some really good features.
Look on DPreview http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/compare.asp this allows you to put in the features you want and then what cameras may suit your needs (bear in mind it is not perfect but it is a start)
Read reviews, look on the net to see who has postitives and who has negatives about a camera (there will always be some negatives), unfortunately no single camera will suit all your needs.
I like the Fuji S9500 (now replaced by the 9600), but there are offerings from Canon, Nikon and Olympus (as well as others) that are just as notable.

Kallistos
01-17-2007, 06:24 PM
If you have already bought into an SLR system it might be best to buy the same brand, meaning all the lenses you already have will fit the new body.

I use a Canon 350D as my digital camera and you can get these at a good price second hand now, because they bought out a new model recently. Try to shop around for the best prices, although I got mine in the sale at Jessops, cheaper than anywhere else I could find!

siyenna
01-18-2007, 06:47 AM
Thankyou Kallistos and Windy for your advice- it has been very helpful!

Windy
01-18-2007, 06:52 AM
Our pleasure :)

cedarartworld
02-01-2007, 04:53 PM
Suggest you get the Canon XT 350d or 400D

TMeeks
02-05-2007, 10:32 PM
The most important factor in choosing a camera is to determine, first, how you intend to use it. It makes a vast difference in the type and brand that I would select for myself or as a gift for others.

If you have young, active children or want to shoot pets, then I'd suggest a Casio point & shoot becuase they fire the instant you push the shutter button.

If macro photography is your primary interest I'd either go with the Canon S3 or one of the Panasonic cameras with a 12x zoom. The Panasonic cameras are lighter and more intuitive to use.

If you are going to shoot in a studio or desire to create artistic photos, then any one of the SLR cameras will do the trick. I choose Canon simply due to the available lenses and an easily identifiable upgrade path (Full Frame). But, all of the SLR cameras perform well these days.

But, don't get caught up in the megapixel madness. Many times, a 10 megapixel camera will not perform as well as a 7 megapixel camera becuase there is often a trade-off between resolution and dynamic range.

Jawn Doe
02-15-2007, 05:57 PM
i have a canon s3 is and love it, i opted for it over a dslr because im a kid paying for my own camera and i wanted to wait for the prices on the dslrs to go down, so i got a versatile pro-sumer (i think im using that word right) for the meantime. the super macro function is so good it focuses on dust on the lens sometimes.
dont buy into the megapixel madness as TMeeks said, the only time megapixels come into play is when printing and the more megapixels you cram onto a tiny sensor, the more noise you get. the more important factors are the lens and the photographer
i'd reccomend canon if you get a point and shoot, out of all the point and shoots ive used the best have been canons (just about lab quality 8x10's from a 3.2 mp point and shoot.) as for dslr's i dont have much personal experience, but just remember that lenses are a bigger investment than bodies
i hope any of that helped

Kallistos
02-16-2007, 04:54 AM
Thing is, for the price of a Canon S3 (250) you can get a second hand Canon 350D with lens. Much more versatile, and in six months you won't want to trade up for a better model (well you will, but I guarantee it'll be the 4500 1DS MkII).

i have a canon s3 is and love it, i opted for it over a dslr because im a kid paying for my own camera and i wanted to wait for the prices on the dslrs to go down, so i got a versatile pro-sumer (i think im using that word right) for the meantime. the super macro function is so good it focuses on dust on the lens sometimes.
dont buy into the megapixel madness as TMeeks said, the only time megapixels come into play is when printing and the more megapixels you cram onto a tiny sensor, the more noise you get. the more important factors are the lens and the photographer
i'd reccomend canon if you get a point and shoot, out of all the point and shoots ive used the best have been canons (just about lab quality 8x10's from a 3.2 mp point and shoot.) as for dslr's i dont have much personal experience, but just remember that lenses are a bigger investment than bodies
i hope any of that helped

Oldthumbs
02-16-2007, 09:46 AM
the super macro function is so good it focuses on dust on the lens sometimes.

Now, THAT would be a good trick. :D

Ray

Kallistos
02-16-2007, 09:51 AM
Now, THAT would be a good trick. :D

Ray

I was wondering how it could do that, since the minimal focal distance for most P&S with Super Macro is about 4 inches or something.