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Rene'
01-02-2007, 09:29 AM
I already posted a sketch in the landscape forum but these two are
plein air related so, .... and i feel more @home here :rolleyes:

I really want to get into aquarel this year so a lot of comment will help!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jan-2007/54908-2_02_01_07.jpg
And the reference.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jan-2007/54908-Ochtendrook_Duiven_20_12_06.jpg

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http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jan-2007/54908-3_02_01_07.jpg
And the reference.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jan-2007/54908-Gezicht_op_Arnhem_25_09_06.jpg

Both aquarel are 7 x 9"
I wonder how this stuff ever will dry in the field, since i keep busy with a paint stripper.

brianc
01-03-2007, 08:09 PM
Rene',

I had to look up aquarel on Wikipedia.
"Aquarel is een schildertechniek waarbij een schilderij gemaakt wordt door gebruik van waterverf op papier." -> "Water-colour is a painter technique where a painting is used by water painting on paper."

In this case, you're using original oils as reference for the water colors.

I think they both appear brighter and lighter. You are using more color in your water color paintings, and I think less black. This makes them brighter and "sunnier". The first painting original has the feeling of a damp smoggy day, but the painting is warmer and the smoke from the stacks stays distant. Lots of sunlight coming through.

The second seems similar to me. The original has a dampness to it that is lesser in the water color.

I think these are great exercises. You should be able to let water colors dry for 10 minutes in the field and then pack them and go. If you're really worried, use a dry piece of water color paper in between the damp paintings.

- Brian

JanB
01-04-2007, 08:10 AM
I think #2 is successful in both watercolor and in oil. In number one I find the repetitive vertical grasses in the foreground distracting and a bit unnatural, though in the oil the texture you have is varied and interesting...now you need to find a way to get that same naturalness with the watercolors. A sea sponge and a fan brush can be fun with watercolors for that kind of stuff.

Rene'
01-04-2007, 10:40 AM
Thanks both of you,
It's a hell of a challenge indeed, although on rainy days these practices
are nice stuff. Today i did one on a suggestion to use only one colour
to getting more feel for the values and so here the result:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Jan-2007/54908-6_02_01_07.jpg
I really hope watercolors dries quicker in the field, because this one took
almost a whole day to make, ... putting on a wash let it dry, putting on a
wash, let it dry, ..... :confused: ow well C&C please!!

Bey! :wave:

brianc
01-04-2007, 10:57 AM
Thanks both of you,
It's a hell of a challenge indeed, although on rainy days these practices
are nice stuff. Today i did one on a suggestion to use only one colour
to getting more feel for the values and so here the result:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Jan-2007/54908-6_02_01_07.jpg
I really hope watercolors dries quicker in the field, because this one took
almost a whole day to make, ... putting on a wash let it dry, putting on a
wash, let it dry, ..... :confused: ow well C&C please!!

Bey! :wave:

My watercolor instructor had us use a heated hair blower to dry the washes quickly. In the field, things dry fairly quickly in the wind and sun. Not so sure about foggy damp days :)

JanB
01-04-2007, 12:33 PM
Like, no love, no really, really love this monochrome :clap: :clap: :clap: Watercolor paper also comes in several soft colors....which gives you a second "color" even when you only use one color of paint. The drying time might be becasue of the kind of poaper you are using.....I also second the use of a hair dryer in the studio.