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Turner
04-09-2002, 10:34 AM
I've done this study in photoshop... it's basically a filtered version of a photo of cranberry bogs near my home.

I'd like to execute this in acrylics.. but don't know where to start! (except the sketching part, of course... even that... well, I don't know.)

Some questions:

How to handle the sky blend? Lately, for some reason, I'm thinking that if the brushwork of the sky doesn't "match" the brushwork of the landforms, the painting will look too inconsistent.

Recommendations needed - basic palette! I don't know which ones to purchase to get this tonal range. I have a "starter set" but am unfamiliar with mixing.. ( accurately ;) ) and realize I may be able to get away with four or five tubes plus maybe red.. not sure.

How should I layer my forms/colors? I'm inclined to work "far to near", in other words, sky, then distant trees, then near trees, then far object plane, then mid field, then close...

Ok.. maybe a really dumb question... almost definitely! :) ...

I'd like to do small studies (5 x 7 or so) but then move up gradually to 3 x 4 feet. I realize I'll need different brushes, if only larger sizes of the same types of brushes I use for the studies..

So any recommendations? Through playing around with different brushes I have, I know some work better for some types of brushwork - obviously - but I'm not sure whether I should try to stick with a single, prominent brush type such as a filbert, or if I would get better results by using a different brush for underpainting, or broad details.

Whoo! Probably more questions later. If I could paint like what I can easily produce in Photoshop... I'll tell ya...

Thanks!

Andrew

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Apr-2002/cranberry.jpg

cmorrow05
04-09-2002, 01:47 PM
As a newbie myself, I'm interested in seeing what people here recommend. As far as palette, I've noticed that the more people you ask, the more paints you'll end up buying. :) But I'm currently taking an acrylics course, so here are my 2 cents.

Palette:
My instructor basically had us stick to red, blue, and yellow, a cool and a dark from each, then some exceptions. Here's what he listed, using Golden paints:

Red: Cadmium Red Medium and Quinacridone Red
Yellow: Cad Yellow Light, Cad Yellow Medium
Blue: Ultramarine and Phthalo Blue (Green Shade)
Others: Titanium white, Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, Raw Umber, Yellow Ochre, Red Oxide.

I think that was the list, I might have one of the yellows wrong. Anyway, I've found it to be a pretty versatile palette so far. But as I said, I'm a newbie as well, so take it with a grain of salt.

As far as mixing, I'd recommend making a chart of sorts, experiment with what happens when you mix various colors, see how colors react with others, their transparency, their relative intensities. By keeping a chart you'll have something to refer to when you forget.

IMHO, don't be afraid to mix up your brushwork. That's what changes the texture and adds another interesting element to the painting.

I think painting far to near would work in this case, but you might want to see what the others say.

Brushes: Can't help you there. I'm still playing with color. ;)

So there are my thoughts. Looking forward to seeing your work!

Andrew
04-09-2002, 02:23 PM
But for a palette I use:

Cad Red medium
Naphthol Crimson
Cad Yellow Med
Yellow Ochre
Pthalo Blue
Ultramarine blue
Raw sienna
Burnt Sienna
Raw Umber
Burnt Umber
Titanium White
Mars or Ivory black (rarely used)

And for special occasions
Diazionin purple
Vermillion
Alizarin Crimson

I pick an choose the few colors that I use per painting. But with the above I can mix nearly anything.

Andrew

Turner
04-09-2002, 03:02 PM
Thanks Colleen -


"As far as mixing, I'd recommend making a chart of sorts, experiment with what happens when you mix various colors, see how colors react with others, their transparency, their relative intensities. By keeping a chart you'll have something to refer to when you forget."

Funny you should mention that - I've been searching for a book, which I just found out was out of print for some outlandish reason - "The Acrylic Painter's Pocket Pallette".... I have the Oil version.

It's a huge mixing guide... Oh well.

Thanks for the advice!

Andrew

Turner
04-09-2002, 03:03 PM
Thanks Andrew -

I assume this palette is indeed for landscape?

Andrew

Originally posted by Andrew
But for a palette I use:

Cad Red medium
Naphthol Crimson
Cad Yellow Med
Yellow Ochre
Pthalo Blue
Ultramarine blue
Raw sienna
Burnt Sienna
Raw Umber
Burnt Umber
Titanium White
Mars or Ivory black (rarely used)

And for special occasions
Diazionin purple
Vermillion
Alizarin Crimson

I pick an choose the few colors that I use per painting. But with the above I can mix nearly anything.

Andrew

Andrew
04-09-2002, 03:38 PM
I use that set for everything. I rarely paint landscapes, as my studio time is at night ( I work days), and don't get out to paint much. I mostly do still life with a few portrait style works. These painting colors I derived from oil painting method books (which is what is available), and they correspond to Blake's choices for acylics too. I find these selections to be quite versatile.

Andrew

BlackTigr
04-09-2002, 07:24 PM
You're working with acrylics...Why do smaller studies? Just take what'cha got, and if that doesn't work, paint over it.

Love acrylics.

--BT

Einion
04-09-2002, 07:33 PM
Hi Andrew, since you're planning on doing some small studies to begin with that's a great start. Nothing beats hands-on practice to get a feel for a medium.

A long subtle blend of the type in this sky is one of the very hardest things to do by brush with acrylics, the only advice I can give is to practice with glazing and scumbling, both of which can be used to build a transition from one colour to another. I would start with a flat colour, the lighter one for instance, and slowly work towards the opposing corner. You could of course try to blend this wet but it would be very difficult over the width of the final painting you are planning. Painting on canvas might help too as the texture of the support will helps you, smooth boards are very unforgiving for subtle transitions which is why many illustrators use an airbrush for skies and such but paint everything else by hand.

The palette question is a biggee, my core palette consists of two yellows, two reds and two blues, some earth colours plus black and white (very close to the one recommended by Colleen's instructor and the other Andrew's) which is versatile enough to paint a huge range of subjects accurately, certainly fine for landscape work. Since you already have some colours you might list them here so we can suggest any additions but you might not need any at this stage - many artists prefer working with a smaller palette (one of each primary plus white for example) which, although it doesn't allow accurate colour matching in the main, makes for easier control and helps form a cohesive picture. If you haven't already checked it out, have a look at the Color Theory/Mixing forum, there are many current and old threads with discussions on colour, palette choices and so forth.

Working back to front is the most common method people employ, and almost everyone probably does this to some extent when painting. It seems logical to most people to paint in this order and it also has some solid practical reasons why it is a good idea, as for instance there is often more texture in the brushwork in the middle- and foreground and this is easier to apply over the smoother background than the reverse would be.

You really can use almost any type of brush for acrylics, I have used everything from housepainters' 2" brushes to 000 W&N Series 7 sables. <A HREF=http://www.artspace2000.com/Art_%20Impact/june/choosing_the_right_brush.htm>This page</A> is worth a look. For the size you want to paint eventually a good basic selection might include a few large bristle filberts or flats, some medium bristles in various styles and a couple of sable rounds. I personally prefer synthetic bristle as hoghair gets a bit slack when wet and Kolinsky rounds over anything else for their spring and longevity. I have recommended something like this myself to people over the years but William Whitaker put it better:
A pretty good brush rule of thumb is to find the largest brush for the job, and then put it aside and actually use an even larger brush.

Einion

Bendaini
04-09-2002, 08:01 PM
The pallete they have listed here is pretty good sounding to me.

For brushes i would start with going down to walmart and going into the craft section. you will see a little pacage of 4-6 brushes in variouse sizes and shapes. You might want one of those.

For acrylics i would suggest a flat brush, an oval brush, a liner, and a stiffle brush, all in veriouse sizes. You might want one large and one small of each, or go for a wider range.

In oils i use a fan brush a lot. I also use a very small flat brush, and a 1 inch round brush that basicly surves as a stiffle brush. I have been trying to get a 2 inch flat brush but they are VERY expencive. They are also very needed for my landscapes.

The fan brush is really good for pine treese so you might want one. Its also good for blending.

Also, at walmart they do sell complete starter sets of acrylics AND oils for pretty cheep. I got my starter oils for 10 bucks. The one that came with a pallet, cups, oil, and brushes was about 20.

These are student grade paints, both oil and acrylic ones, so you can use these for starting. It will give you something to start working the colors a bit, and also let you find out how to use the colors.

Some people might think there is something wrong with getting your art supplies at walmart but i just sold a painting i made with suplies from there for a nice price... they work...

Turner
04-10-2002, 12:43 AM
Thanks everyone! Great info.

I don't have my paints handy to list, but I know I don't have most of the ones mentioned in this post, so I think I'll start there.

Cheers!

Andrew

Andrew
04-10-2002, 11:33 AM
Have you made a decision on those yet? I prefer the stiffer bristle brush. I get good life out of Grumbacher eterna , which Dick blick has for $1.39. Except for WC art projects that I will have to scan, I paint nothing smaller than 18x24, and my favorite brush is about 1" wide.

I have some synthetic brushes for detail work, which are between sables and bristle. My favorites are W&N, but I have a few Robert Simmons (Wally World specials) that have held up quite well.

Andrew

Turner
04-10-2002, 07:29 PM
Hi, and thanks again!

Huh... I don't have my brushes handy! I didn't want you to think I was just blowing off your question..

Anyway, I did go grab that pallette of paint - yellow ochre, I think, was called yellow oxide...

I'll be back to post my brushes... -but- I keep thinking about something Larry Seiler said... something about being happy with painting with a stick if he could get the paint on the canvas with it ;)

I wish there was a Dick Blick near me. I'm so impatient.

Andrew

Originally posted by Andrew
Have you made a decision on those yet? I prefer the stiffer bristle brush. I get good life out of Grumbacher eterna , which Dick blick has for $1.39. Except for WC art projects that I will have to scan, I paint nothing smaller than 18x24, and my favorite brush is about 1" wide.

I have some synthetic brushes for detail work, which are between sables and bristle. My favorites are W&N, but I have a few Robert Simmons (Wally World specials) that have held up quite well.

Andrew