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jrm
12-26-2006, 11:01 PM
I'm a long standing portrait oil painter. Am very interested in digital art. I've been reading as much as I could find about this medium. Looked at artist sites, read this an other forums but haven't seen any references to printing final work. Would like info on printing, aspect ratios, etc. Thanks in advance.

madster
12-27-2006, 04:31 AM
You will need to study and understand Print Resolution, as well as enough Color Management Theory to understand the CMYK (Cyan Magenta Yellow blacK) limitations of print.
A fair understanding of Pantone colors would behoove you, as well.

In a nutshell, monitors display at 96 pixels per inch (72ppi for MACs).
Printers need at LEAST 150 ppi resolution to print decently, without excessively blurry edges. 300 ppi is optimum. This means that anything you create digitally will need to be a LARGE file, at a 300ppi resolution, and anything you create at 72ppi will be very small, very blurry edged, or both.

Monitors generally create in RGB mode (Red Green Blue), which is beautiful to look at, as your monitor can display over 5 million colors. Unfortunately, RGB does not print, and CMYK is not as bright or vivid in colors by a long shot. Hence the study of CMYK color management...
Check the Color forum here at WC, and read some of what Don Jusko has to say on the subject. You will want to use his Color wheel (http://www.realcolorwheel.com/rcwplotter.htm) for CMYK/RGB to best select the colors that you can use that are printable.

You will also either need to invest in a high quality printer, with expensive inks, or find a good quality professional service in your area. Either way, it can be an investment.

~M

jhercilia
12-27-2006, 01:39 PM
Today, there are also high quality RGB printer that use archival pigments. For paintings, you'll do more than great with only 150 dpi resolution as long as you painted at the final size you want to output it to avoid any degradation in quality. So, if you want your painting to be printed at a final size of 16x20, you would start your file with those dimensions at 150 dpi. 300 dpi is the requirements for outputting to magazines for example. So you won't have a huge file either since magazines are small. But for printing on canvas, watercolor paper, etc, 150 dpi will be more than enough.

What's important is to have your monitor calibrated to make sure that what you see in your screen is what is going to be printed. If you are sending your files to a printer, you can always send the file with one of your own proofs so that they can match your colors. In my case, I do all printing in my studio unless it is a size bigger than what I can print, then I will send it out together with my printed proof.

When you set up your file, and enter for example 150 dpi as your resolution, your image will look huge on the screen since the screen's resolution is 72 dpi on pcs and 92 dpi on macs, but the amount of pixels will be the same.

jrm
12-27-2006, 06:04 PM
Thank you both for the reply. I have the epson 2200 & a good monitor which will at least give me some way of testing, although not to a finished size. Arthritis is one reason I became interested in digital art since most of my pain is in my dominate hand. Can't see giving up painting altogether.

jhercilia
12-27-2006, 08:45 PM
I have that Epson too and it works great.

wabinodin
12-30-2006, 06:07 PM
Arthritis is one reason I became interested in digital art since most of my pain is in my dominate hand. Can't see giving up painting altogether.

Hello - just thought you like to know , you are not alone looking for an alternative in the arts. I became allergic to almost every thing I worked with i.e. oils , acrylics, metals (most) , many different types of clay . The digi realm is a wonderful place. Hang in there ! Best wishes ! :wave:

JTGMTZ
01-01-2007, 04:30 PM
If you sign up for a free gallery at Deviant Art you can set up any uploaded image to be printed using their printers. To get a 20X30 inch print, the artists fee is only about $16 not counting shipping. You can also get images printed on mugs, mousepads, canvas, etc. They say that the prints are archival and should last 70 years. They will also storefront your art. Basically they handle orders, shipping, etc. You will get paid quarterly for what work you sell. I have not tried it yet nor do I know how they compare with other printers. But you may find it worth looking into. The site has downloadable helps to walk you through sizing, uploading, and proofing.

A quicky guide to how to compute the resolution you need to set up at is to decide what the dimensions in inches you will want the final print to be at. Set your digital software to work at 300ppi (pixels per inch). Now multiply the inches by 300 to get the final resolution you will want. At deviant Art they want you to compute it a 75 pixel border too. For example, if I want the final image to be 16X20, I will need my image to be 4650X5800 to accomodate the white border. I just work at this size and add the border once I am done using my software's "Add a border' feature. The final image will be 4800X6000 pixels.

I hope to order my first print soon. I will try to give feedback on the quality and service of DA.

mttamjan
03-05-2007, 05:00 PM
Hi
I'm new to this site. I'm searching for some information regarding printing my digital photos onto canvas. I recently bought some 8X11.5 canvas at a computer show designed for inkjst printers. This is brand new to me. My print came out beautiful but now I need more info. How do you stretch this canvas, onto what? What I read on the web talks about stretching large canvas. How about small ones? Also, I would like to know if there is a preservative I should use. Right now I am working with a rather old Epson printer - the 890. Before I purchase anything more I want to kick this new media around. I would appreciate any information.
Thanks
Janet

JTGMTZ
03-05-2007, 05:44 PM
Maybe these link will help you:

http://www.liquitex.com/resources/GicleeVarnishing.cfm

http://www.inkjetart.com/misc/bulldog.html

I have also heard of Krylon acrylic spray being used.

Here is another one: http://www.gogiclee.info/inkset.htm

barryt
03-06-2007, 06:49 AM
Hi
I'm new to this site. I'm searching for some information regarding printing my digital photos onto canvas. I recently bought some 8X11.5 canvas at a computer show designed for inkjst printers. This is brand new to me. My print came out beautiful but now I need more info. How do you stretch this canvas, onto what? What I read on the web talks about stretching large canvas. How about small ones? Also, I would like to know if there is a preservative I should use. Right now I am working with a rather old Epson printer - the 890. Before I purchase anything more I want to kick this new media around. I would appreciate any information.
Thanks
Janet

I usually print my own onto A3+ paper using an Epson R1800 (pigment inks)
I have tried recently a commercial printer onto canvas and the picture below shows two hanging on my wall. I like the quality. The one on the left cost me 59 including postage.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Mar-2007/70662-DSC00592pm.jpg

JTGMTZ
03-06-2007, 08:37 AM
Here is a link with illustrative photos for the steps for stretching a canvas:

http://www.artsparx.com/canvasstretching.asp