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Diana Lee
12-18-2006, 01:04 PM
I want to show a stilllife I did called Lemons. This is on a 9 x12 smooth white claybord. I used oil pencils. My pallette is... for the lemons I used Yellow, Yellow Orange, Orange, Red Orange, Red, Crimson Red, Terra Cotta, Yellow Green, Green, Burnt Umber, and Black. For the bowl I used Cerulean Blue, Blue, Indigo Blue, and Black. For the towel I used Cerulean Blue, Indigo Blue, and Black. For the wood surface I used Light Flesh, Yellow Ochre, Sienna Brown, Burnt Umber, Indigo Blue, and Black. I used some of the wood colors in the reflection on the bowl.
I am including some details and I will add more later. The first detail is a close up of the lemon on top. the next is a section of the table in the sunlight. I used the broad nib to create the texture of the wood. And on the lemon I used the pointed nib and the broad nib.

Diana

Bertoni
12-18-2006, 02:00 PM
Diana:
I don't think I've ever seen work in oil pencil!! You did a dynamite job with it together with scratch on the white Claybord!:thumbsup:

Diana Lee
12-18-2006, 02:04 PM
Actually, oil pencils are meant for wood work. It is very similar to color pencil, only a tad more transparent.

Diana

Trilby
12-18-2006, 06:33 PM
Very interesting medium. The lemons are beautiful, but I'm intriqued with the terry cloth towel. The texture of that is so spot on and life like. All very beautiful.
TJ

Diana Lee
12-18-2006, 06:39 PM
Thanks, here are some details of the towel. It was the ability to scratch that did the trick for the towel, everything white is scratched.

Diana

Obedec
12-18-2006, 09:21 PM
OK I'm inspired to go scratch...just as soon as I finish cards.
Karen

Garbonzo
12-18-2006, 10:29 PM
Diana this is truly awesome. I'm sitting here scratching my head in amazement at what you do with scratchboard. Wow!

Diana Lee
12-19-2006, 12:23 AM
Thanks Karen and Harold. You people sure know how to make a gal feel good.

Diana

Celticelf
12-19-2006, 11:13 AM
Diana, I keep learning so much from you. I have used my oil pencils on wood, but never would have thought to go this route. I have been afraid of the white clayboard, but now I have to try.
Diana, you are such a professional I have a serious question. You show us so much for our benefit, do you ever run into problems with your artwork being stolen or misused after being posted. This site is like the mountain art shows where it is exciting to meet other artists, but people warn me against posting artwork. I think that would be more a problem for writers. Opinion? Terri

Diana Lee
12-19-2006, 12:10 PM
Hi Terri,

That's a good question. I am not too worried. On this site, at most, the image is 500 x 600 pixels. At 300 dpi that makes the images actual size about 1 1/2 inches x 2 inches. If any one tried to enlarge it to print the quality would be so deteriated it wouldn't be worth a whole lot. If someone wanted to pass it around via the net so others could see it then that would be ok (but it would be nice if they gave me the credit), Heck that is what I am doing here, showing it to others. Most of my work is based on images from the Wetcanvas reference library so there is not need to copy my stuff, they could just go to the library and get the original.

I recently entered a piece called Tiger Cub in my local county fair. It won a first place ribbon. Someone took it right off the wall and walked out with it, with several hundred people in the building. My point being, where is it really safe?

If someone wants to rip me off, that's on their Karma (so to speak).

Diana

Celticelf
12-20-2006, 10:44 AM
Thanks! Terri

Meisie
12-20-2006, 05:14 PM
AHHHHHHHHHH that towel is to faint for :D really! I love the whole piece, but cannot get over the towel.

Someone stole you tiger cub? brazen @#$%^ I can't believe it! well, that one may want it of course, but steal it? Good grief!

I'm very sorry to hear that :(

Diana Lee
12-21-2006, 11:05 AM
Thanks Meisie, I was very upset when it happened and I didn't like the way the fair handled it at all. I did, however, get local news coverage (both tv and newspaper).

Diana

Rodman
12-27-2006, 11:38 PM
i like the lemons and the table...a lot..but, i freak'n LOVE hte bowl and the towel..that towel is something extra...thanks for posting..rod-man

Diana Lee
12-28-2006, 08:56 PM
Thank you Rod-man. I don't think I could have done the rough terrycloth texture of the towel if it were not on scratchboard. I really love this medium.

Diana

Bertoni
12-28-2006, 11:11 PM
OMG! Diana: I just saw the closeup of the towel.:thumbsup: I tell you, if a publisher doesn't grab your book they should be out of the book biz!!!!!!!!!!

uuglypher
12-28-2006, 11:14 PM
Diana-
As I recently mentioned, my experience with scratchboard technique is limited to a few pieces on stone. I've also recently begun to give serious attention to colored pencil paintings and have come quickly to the realization that layering of colors is basic to full development of the vibrancy of mixed colors. Have you found the clayboard to have adequate tooth to permit layering with CPs? Obviously, you were able to accomplish it with the oil pencils you used; I'm curious if you've had equal success with the wax-based pencils.

Your work is truly inspiring!

Many thanks,
Dave Graham

uuglypher
12-29-2006, 03:04 PM
Diana-
I gotta admit, as a relative newby to the colored pencil world, that I'm unsure as to what you mean by "oil pencils". Are these simply colored pencils with a petroleum oil or vegetable oil base rather than a wax base, or something else altogether? What brand do you use?
My local Hobby Lobby and Michael's weren't sure what I mean't by the term "oil pencils" ... which seemed reasonable since I wasn't sure either.

Thanks,
Dave Graham

Celticelf
12-29-2006, 07:12 PM
Dave, I got small set of oil pencils at Michaels - they are stocked with the wood burning supplies. Staff is usually unaware of this though. For Christmas before Utrechts abandoned Houston, my guardian angel honey ordered me a huge gorgeous set of Faber-Castell Polychromos. Since then they have doubled in price, but they are luscious. I really don't find a lot of difference between using them and using Prismacolor, but a lot of difference compared to using the dryer Derwents. I am far from the expert Diana is, though, but I'm a compulsive pencil shopper:) For real.

Diana Lee
12-29-2006, 07:30 PM
Hi Dave,
Oil color pencils are meant to be used for wood working. The brand I use is Walnuthollow. Dick Blick sells a very small set with a few colors. They are very similar to color pencils except they are semi-opaque, so the woodgrain can still be seen. I like them on claybord. The one thing you have to keep in mind when working with color pencils or oil pencils is they need something to grab on to to get rich colors. First you may want to use a light grade sandpaper and sand the surface of the board. It helps to have your pencils very sharp at all times. And it really helps to use the crosshatching technique. I have never used color pencils on paper so I don't know if it applies, but with claybord you need to build up your darks starting with black for several layers of crosshatching, then you can add other colors using more crosshatching.
There isn't that much difference between oil pencils and color pencils, and since the oil pencils are a bit more difficult to find you may want to just use the color pencils.

Diana

Diana Lee
12-29-2006, 07:37 PM
Hi Terri, I didn't see you there before I answered Dave. Honestly, I am not the expert you may think I am. I am very new to color pencil. I have only done maybe a half dozen pieces and all on scratchboard, none on paper. I sure do like them, though. I have been experimenting on scratchboard with everything from oil paint to felt tip pens.

Diana

ScratchboardArtist
01-04-2007, 11:12 AM
Hi Diana,

I'm completely new to Wet Canvas. I wanted to let you know that I loved the richness of the color and texture of the piece. I hadn't thought about using oil pastels on scratchboard.

I am very excited about joining the Wet Canvas scratchboard forum and look forward to learning from the community.

Diana Lee
01-04-2007, 11:38 AM
Hi LinZ, I didn't use oil pastels, I used oil pencils. To add oil pastels before scratching would greatly cut down your ability to remove scratching debris without removing the pastel color in the process.

Diana

ScratchboardArtist
01-04-2007, 11:40 AM
That makes more sense. Thanks for the update!

Obedec
01-04-2007, 11:42 AM
Welcome LinZ, I checked you website...love your stuff.
Karen

ScratchboardArtist
01-04-2007, 11:48 AM
Thanks Karen for both the warm welcome and the compliments! I'm addicted! I checked out this forum a little yesterday and thought that I could learn a lot from the group. I've been impressed all around. I guess it's really hard for a group of scratchboard artists to get together outside of the internet. I haven't come across too many of us.

Thanks again,

Celticelf
01-04-2007, 02:58 PM
LinZ - I, too, just checked your site and your work is sooo fine. This forum has totally changed my definition of scratchart. WOW!

ScratchboardArtist
01-05-2007, 12:43 PM
Thanks Terri!

I like most people on this site, truly enjoy this medium. A glassblower gave me a piece of advice once that took my work to a new level: "However much time you spend on your work right now, spend twice as long on your next piece." I try to keep that in mind as well as the idea that life is short. Though I produce less pieces now, I feel like I'm coming closer to realizing my goal of leaving behind a portfolio of works that really represent my abilities and interests.

Currently, I am working on a series of American Architecture. I am finishing up a piece on the Supreme Court Building, and am having a hard time deciding whether to include a flag pole or use artistic license and ignore it. I usually dive right into my works instead of using the tracing paper technique like I probably should. Then again, the painter in me likes the freedom of not knowing exactly where everything is going. Do you have pieces on the internet that I can view?

Thanks again-

ScratchboardArtist
01-05-2007, 12:46 PM
Hi Terri-

I am so new to this posting and chatting thing... I missed your self-portrait. Sorry! I just saw it. I can never get as much white space as you were able to accomplish. I love the expression and the use of contrast. I sometimes get hung up in the detail and forget the contrast which is so necessary to be able to see the image from across a room.

Thanks again and HAPPY scratching!

JDuckett
01-05-2007, 02:20 PM
I like the different looks you achieve using different mediums with the scratching. Your detail is great.

ScratchboardArtist
01-08-2007, 09:57 AM
Thanks John! I see you are a new member as well. What do you like about Wet Canvas and what prompted you to join? I joined because I think as a scratchboard artist, that I felt pretty isolated.

I went to your site and enjoyed your work as well. In your scratchboard gallery I noticed that your work, like mine has a variety of subject matter. Are you interested in lots of different things or are they commissioned subject matter? Both reasons explain the variety in my own work. What do you enjoy the most in scratchboard and what subjects give you the most trouble?

Thanks again-I'm thrilled to meet so many cheerful and talented artists and art enthusiasts through Wet Canvas!