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View Full Version : I'm thinking about trying gouache


adaus
11-20-2006, 04:23 PM
Should I? My experience is with oil paint, is gouache used like it basically?

The paintings I've seen look so good, so I've been curious. The only gouache in town is by Savoir Faire, does anyone here use these?

Well, any imput would be much appriciated.

Richard Saylor
11-23-2006, 03:11 AM
There are a few similarities between gouache and oils, but there are probably more differences than similarities. I would suggest reading the Wikipedia article on gouache and following up on its references. (Unfortunately, there is an error in the article which I will attempt to correct in the near future.)

Richard

adaus
11-24-2006, 09:19 PM
thanks for sharing

osidianrose
11-25-2006, 11:11 PM
I find gouache a real bitch to work with as a medium. They are opaque watercolours. They have higher pigments than watercolours and usually have some type of chalky substance to make it thick. I don't see any similarities between gouache and oil, except that they are both paint.

Richard Saylor
11-25-2006, 11:41 PM
I find gouache a real bitch to work with as a medium. They are opaque watercolours. They have higher pigments than watercolours and usually have some type of chalky substance to make it thick. I don't see any similarities between gouache and oil, except that they are both paint.The thickness and opacity of gouache really should come only from pigment concentration and not some additive. I'm fairly certain that W&N and Holbein consist almost entirely of pigment and gum arabic. An amount of chalk dust sufficient to change the consistency or opacity would adversely affect handling qualities and color.

Richard

dbclemons
11-26-2006, 12:10 PM
"Should you?" Absolutely! I would defintely say that oils and gouache handle very differently, specifically in how you blend or the washes you create with gouache, where washes of oil is not a good idea. The quality of paint you use is important. If you use gouache that dries more pale, as many do, it's a skill you'll have to acquire in how to manage that change of value. Some brands like Graham or Schmincke are very up-front with using no extenders or dyes. I'm not familiar with the Savoir Faire brand, but Blick lists it (http://www.dickblick.com/categories/gouache/)as a student grade paint.

Richard Saylor
11-26-2006, 02:57 PM
Opacity is another matter which is often misunderstood. Oil, acrylic, and gouache are usually considered "opaque" mediums. However, just as some acrylic and oil colors are quite transparent, so are some gouache colors, especially within the better brands. For example, I have a tube of M. Graham Quinacridone Red gouache which is just as transparent as my tube of W&N Quinacridone Red watercolor. This transparency is a property of the pigment PR209. Other colors, such as cadmium red PR108 or titanium white PW6, would be significantly more opaque.

Richard