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Todd March
04-02-2002, 04:00 AM
Still in the learning phase of oils and their many mediums, I am wondering of someone can more fully explain the uses of the fabled Maroger mediums...

Most specifically, Gamblin's "Neo-Meglip"... I almost bought some today to try, but figured I should come here and learn more about what it is and what it can do, before parting with the bucks...

Thanks,

Todd

Luis Guerreiro
04-02-2002, 05:58 AM
Originally posted by Todd March
Still in the learning phase of oils and their many mediums, I am wondering of someone can more fully explain the uses of the fabled Maroger mediums...

Most specifically, Gamblin's "Neo-Meglip"... I almost bought some today to try, but figured I should come here and learn more about what it is and what it can do, before parting with the bucks...

Thanks,

Todd

Hi Todd,
If Gamblin is making a "Neo-Melgip", then it is not Melgip obviously, but a "SAFE" version of the traditional Megilp.
Megilp has nothing to do with Maroger Mediums, which in turn have many versions, much to the convenience of manufacturers, etc...
Joseph Sheppard, who used to be one of JACQUES MAROGER's students has given us an account of what such mediums are and how they are made. The recipes are available in his J. Sheppard's book "HOW TO PAINT LIKE THE OLD MASTERS", available from www.amazon.com and amazon.co.uk. It is a good book, although I don't recommend making them.
Also, there is accurate information on www.oils-studio.co.uk about such mediums.
Keep in mind that Maroger Mediums are poisonous and have to be handled with great care as they are rich in either lead or manganese components or sometimes both, depending on the manufacturer. They MUST be handled with gloves and no contact with skin, inhalation, etc should be allowed. If you have children or pets at home, make sure you LOCK dangerous materials such as these in a safe manner.
Regards
Luis:)

mirza
04-02-2002, 11:29 AM
From Gamblin's website:

MEDIUM COHESION / MODERATE DRY

Neo-Megilp is a 21st century formulation of one of the Old Masters' true secrets. This soft gel impasto, originally called Megilp and more recently called "Maroger" medium, can create a unified atmospheric, dimensional layer into which low viscosity color can be floated. Painters in the 18th century knew that this combination of lead boiled in oil and mastic varnish darkens significantly over time but still used it.

Neo-Megilp, based on alkyd resin, is made without lead or turpentine. The soft silky gel has less drag on the brush than the Galkyds
Neo-Megilp 90% + oil colors 10% makes a soft glaze impasto that is slow drying.

Depends how you feel about alkyd--but it's not Maroger and it's not megilp.

Luis Guerreiro
04-02-2002, 01:29 PM
Originally posted by mirza
From Gamblin's website:

MEDIUM COHESION / MODERATE DRY

Neo-Megilp is a 21st century formulation of one of the Old Masters' true secrets. This soft gel impasto, originally called Megilp and more recently called "Maroger" medium, can create a unified atmospheric, dimensional layer into which low viscosity color can be floated. Painters in the 18th century knew that this combination of lead boiled in oil and mastic varnish darkens significantly over time but still used it.

Neo-Megilp, based on alkyd resin, is made without lead or turpentine. The soft silky gel has less drag on the brush than the Galkyds
Neo-Megilp 90% + oil colors 10% makes a soft glaze impasto that is slow drying.

Depends how you feel about alkyd--but it's not Maroger and it's not megilp.

A couple of notes on the quoted marketing advert from Gamblin if I may:
1. Neo-Megilp is not a 21st Century formulation. Rubbish! LUKAS from Germany has been producing a gel medium for Impasto, called LUKAS No. 5 for donkeys years.
2. The soft gel impasto called Megilp did not became to be known Maroger. This is a gross inacuracy. Megilp and Maroger are different things. Anyone who actually has worked with Maroger knows that although a jelly, it wouldn't be stiff enough to make impasto, or at least I never used it for such purpose.
All modern "Megilp"-like impasto mediums are based on modern synthetic resins and alkyds, etc... I use LUKAS 5 for impastos, because this medium contains hexanone resin which allows a thorough drying from the inside out, preventing the impasto (if too thick) from wrinkling, which is just what I want.
Luis

jmorton
04-04-2002, 09:59 AM
Megilp is a gel medium which is created by combining spirit mastic varnish with a drying oil to which has been added lead salts to form a lead soap usually by cooking the oil with the lead salts, but also by combining the oil with the lead in a soluble form such as lead acetate. Maroger is a gel medium which is created by combining spirit mastic varnish with a drying oil which has been compounded with lead through cooking. Therefor, Maroger is a species of megilp. To say that it is not is to perpetuate a mistaken claim made by Maroger in his writings to deceptively distance his product from the notorious megilp of the late 18th and 19th centuries and, thus, void his claim that he had rediscovered the lost medium of Rubens which had been lost since Rubens' time.

Leopoldo1
04-04-2002, 10:34 AM
Originally posted by Todd March
Still in the learning phase of oils and their many mediums, I am wondering of someone can more fully explain the uses of the fabled Maroger mediums...

Todd,

I like maroger alot, to the point that I started to make it because of the expense of buying it over the counter. Years ago David Lefell's work caught my attention and that is his medium of choice. It has it's uses, but I find it best in alla prima techniques even though it could be brushed down in tighter strokes. Basically it dries your pigments overnight if this is one's way. It is also thixotropic which means your brush strokes are left as you put them on the canvas, no leveling out. Dries all pigments to a uniform sheen, where one can choose to circumvent varnishing afterwards. It has its uses. Below is a painting I did entirely with maroger, thick paint and all........L

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Apr-2002/deaddeer3.jpg