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Nickel
11-10-2006, 11:15 PM
VIII
LINE DRAWING: PRACTICAL

Speed recommends this book on human anatomy.
I don't know if it is still around or not.
If you have a good tip for a book on Human Anatomy for art
students, it'd be great to post the title and author here.

Sir Alfred D. Fripp on this subject, entitled Human Anatomy for Art Students.

I think I've been asked this question before.:)
Did you appreciate your subject?
This seems to be really good advice.

Form to be expressed must first be appreciated. And here the science of teaching fails.
"You can take a horse to the fountain, but you cannot make him drink,"
and in art you can take the student to the point of view from which things are to be appreciated, but you cannot make him see.

How, then, is this appreciation of form to be developed?

Simply by feeding.

Familiarise yourself with all the best examples of drawing you can find,
trying to see in nature the same qualities.

Another truism:

There never was an age when such an amount of artistic food was at the disposal of students. Cheap means of reproduction have brought the treasures of the world's galleries and collections to our very doors in convenient forms for a few pence. The danger is not from starvation, but indigestion.

I think this is good advice too, I've seen many artists that have a wall
of famous paintings to inspire.

You cannot avoid the good things that are hurled at you in these days, but when you come across anything that strikes you as being a particularly fine thing, feed deeply on it. Hang it up where you will see it constantly; in your bedroom, for instance, where it will entertain your sleepless hours, if you are unfortunate enough to have any.

This would be a great thread to post any line exercises you might do,
you don't have to do any
but if you do it'd be great to see them.

Also, if an artists inspires you, it'd be great to know who they are
and which paintings move you. Post an image if you like.
Try to list who painted it, where it is (museum name) and medium.

Sam Cree
11-11-2006, 09:43 AM
Nickel, I've got 2 posters of famous paintings hanging on my wall, one is Hunters in the Snow by Breughel, the other Tunisan Beauty by a Spanish Orientalist (forget his name for the moment!).

I'll post these if you can tell me how to do it...both are availabe at various internet sites and could be hot linked...I don't know how to hot link to this site, though.

Am currently enamoured by Waterhouse's The Tempest.

Nickel
11-11-2006, 01:26 PM
Nickel, I've got 2 posters of famous paintings hanging on my wall, one is Hunters in the Snow by Breughel, the other Tunisan Beauty by a Spanish Orientalist (forget his name for the moment!).

I'll post these if you can tell me how to do it...both are availabe at various internet sites and could be hot linked...I don't know how to hot link to this site, though.

Am currently enamoured by Waterhouse's The Tempest.

Sam I don't think we are to hot link to other sites. Technically. I know some do. Check out this link, it is by TThompie, a memeber here, shows how to save an image to your computer and upload to WC.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=4838277
If this don't work, let me know.
WC automatically resizes images now if larger than allowed so you don't
have to worry with resizing.

Can't wait to see what you post. :)

Sam Cree
11-13-2006, 01:00 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Nov-2006/36005-bru10.jpg

OK, Nickel, I think it worked. In any case, I have a poster of this painting on my office wall (my studio wall, I guess) for inspiration and admiration.

Sam Cree
11-13-2006, 01:05 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Nov-2006/36005-baro_b.jpg

I also have a poster of this watercolor by Jose Tapiro Baro, Spanish, 19th century. I saw the original at the Dahesh, where it is part of the permanent exhibit - it blew my socks off.

Sam Cree
11-13-2006, 02:13 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Nov-2006/36005-waterhouse_destiny.jpg

Recently John Williams Waterhouse has caught my attention. I don't have any of his stuff up, but I'd like to.

Nickel
11-13-2006, 02:13 PM
Sam the one by Jose Tapiro Baro is great, love the way he has modeled form, and the blue just jumps out at you with the richness of joy. I can get lost in a Bruegel but not on account of his style, just there is so much to enjoy. He was a master of line.

Sam Cree
11-13-2006, 03:48 PM
I haven't been able to put my finger on it yet, and Brueghel isn't really classical in some ways I suppose, but when I look at his paintings, I feel that I am really there, that I've been transported back in time to the 16th century. The paintings are pure magic.

In Hunters in the Snow, or Return of the Hunters, whatever its real name is, I feel like I can nearly feel the cold, can smell the weather, the fire, the humantiy and animals, feel the dampness of an impending snowstorm. I think the thing is just amazing.

Precious Mazie
11-14-2006, 12:26 AM
Beautiful and inspiring picutres Sam!

The following quotes from the chapter struck me the most.

“As it is only from one point of view that things can be drawn, and as we have two eyes, therefore two points of view, the closing of one eye will be helpful at first.”
“In Line Drawing shading should only be used to aid the expression of form. It is not advisable to aim at representing the true tone values.”
“Form to be expressed must first be appreciated…How, then, is this appreciation of form to be developed? Simply by feeding. Familiarize yourself with all the best examples of drawing you can find, trying to see in nature the same qualities.”
“There never was an age when such an amount of artistic food was at the disposal of students. Cheap means of reproduction have brought the treasures of the world's galleries and collections to our very doors in convenient forms for a few pence. The danger is not from starvation, but indigestion. Students are so surfeited with good things that they often fail to digest any of them; but rush on from one example to another, taking but snapshot views of what is offered, until their natural powers of appreciation are in a perfect whirlwind of confused ideas.”

I never really thought of our eyes as causing two points of view but as providing us depths of field. But the greatest discrepancy of these points of view are then you are sighting something close to you for a drawing. Your hand on the keyboard for instance can look like it changes almost an inch in position when looked at first with one eye and they with the other.
I like the idea that in line drawing shading should be for form and not tone values. I have messed up many a drawing because of this striving for tonal values and not just for form.

And how right that form to be expressed it must first be appreciated. I know it is much harder for me to draw say football player than just men sitting at a table. Not because one is in motion because snap shots are not in motion but because I really don’t appreciate football. And that like or dislike for the subject seems always to shine through.
And last the paragraph about artistic food probably speaks loudest to the internet, something that was not even thought of back then. We have art indigestion or could easily have. At least for me because I have thousands of pictures downloaded off the internet. I will pick one a week and put it up on my desktop so that I can slow down and appreciate it, learn from it. I have noticed that items that I thought were really well done years ago when I started my collection I now find to be of poorer quality then later items that have been collected.
I am reading this book on my laptop and had to print out sections of the chapter because I could not follow along with his ideas otherwise. The lettering on the illustrations where so tiny it was very hard to read. After printing it out and writing all over the illustration I did figure out what he was trying to say in his “dull” section. There is a lot of information to digest here and I hope to try this week to put some of it to use. Sorry for being so long winded but it was a long chapter!

azulparsnip
11-14-2006, 09:10 AM
I will finish this chapter tonight.

The encouragement to feed on art that speaks to you is water to my soul. There are several things in artists magazine that have touched me deeply , saved but don't keep out visible...but I will dig'em out and stick them o n the corkboard....

I like Brueghel (I think it is his) of the woman and man, the man has a wheel barrel and the woman has a sack hanging off her arm......like they are walking to town.

Waterhouse looks interesting. I bet my husband would like him.

Nickel
11-16-2006, 09:12 PM
Here is the link to chp 9

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=382985



I'm going to work on my wall of pictures this weekend.
Wonder what a good name for this wall is????
I'll post some pics soon.

Nickel
11-19-2006, 09:41 PM
Okie dokie, cut these out tonight and will be my pictures to start with.

I don't know that any are my favorites, but I try to be board-minded
when it comes to art. I like patch-worked quilts too. The old country kind
made out of what ever the person could scrap together.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2006/39040-Picture_001.jpg

I really like these, the Virgin Mary the most. Very beautiful balance to the compostion. The lady, elegant, with a beautiul vase and lace in this one.

Nickel
11-19-2006, 09:43 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2006/39040-Picture_002.jpg

Nickel
11-19-2006, 09:45 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2006/39040-Picture_002a.jpg

Nickel
11-19-2006, 09:46 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2006/39040-Picture_003a.jpg

Not old woman cooking eggs...

Nickel
11-19-2006, 09:49 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2006/39040-Picture_004.jpg

Nickel
11-19-2006, 09:50 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2006/39040-Picture_005.jpg

Precious Mazie
11-19-2006, 11:03 PM
Nickel, Hi!

Christ and the Virgin in the House of Nazarath is a beautiful painting. I've never seen it before. I am often struck by the faces of women in painings. Rarely are they portrayed as happy. I wonder why? Is she looking at her son and seeing what his future will be? Was she never delighted to have a son and happy to watch him grow? Is a happy face boreing? The faces painted by DaVinci and Michealangelo though beautiful hardly ever are portrayed as joyful or happy. Is it because men painted them? Did women painters paint women as happy? Just wondering?
Debby

Precious Mazie
11-19-2006, 11:56 PM
Hi All,
http://www.cia.edu/dreams/surreal/MelancholicReverieTheme.pdf

After posting my last post I went exploring the net and I found this pdf at this site and thought if any one is intrested. It's about Christ and the Virgin in the House of Nazarath and other painting and what the artists were painting. Melancholic Reverie. But now its time for bed! Night all!
Debby

Nickel
11-20-2006, 08:49 AM
Debby that's a great article! Thanks so much! I enjoyed reading it!
Next time you are at the grocery store and walk by the magazines,
they all smile at you. I find it freaky compared to paintings that I normally
see, not many smiles, and your right most don't smile. Every one today is a big happy bubble according to magazines, to see how the real world looks today, sit in your car, or someplace and people watch, they aren't all smiling.
Not many of them look like Venus. nor do I. lol.Of course I do have a cherub that holds my mirror. hehe.

Precious Mazie
11-24-2006, 08:37 PM
Hi Everyone,
Hope your Thanksgiving was fun and that you were surrounded by friends and family! We cooked for three days and ate for two!

:wave: Nickel, yes you can sure see all the "Madison Ave sell it with sex" smiles :) on the magazines and that bugs me too, but I was talking more about an expression of a deeper feeling of joy or happiness in works of art. If art is an expression of life then why isn't there some works of art that show this. There must be joy or happiness in life. I was just wondering why itís not expressed as much as the melancholic or depression. :( Yes not all people you see are smiling but they are not all frowning or all sad or all mad, either.

This is one of the few drawings I made that I felt I captured the feeling of joy my daughter felt when her first baby was born. Itís just in the sketching out stage here. I did a full drawing and then it was accidentally destroyed. :crying: Its one of the projects I want to redo.

My personal experience in this however is that mostly when I draw a person smiling they look like Alfred E. Newman or the Joker from Batman. Is it harder to make a believable facial expression of joy?:confused:

I'm definitely not Venus either and any mirror held by a cherub for me would crack! :eek: LOL

Nickel
11-25-2006, 06:32 PM
Debby, a beautiful start and a lovely happy smile on your daughter's face!
I hope you will show more as you work on this. I like it very much!

Thinking about your question, I think some of the older paintings, they maybe are mostly a way to show a person as important. Maybe important people didn't smile or have happy moments, they just look serious. :D

Precious Mazie
11-26-2006, 02:25 PM
I did do a little research on the net and found a painting or two that expressed joy. Usually in a mother and child setting. I am a little rushed right now but when I have a little more time I will resize the pictures and post them. Thank-you for the encouragement. the baby is now three years old. I had a finished version and wanted to get it framed as a christmas present. I had put the picture up in a closet and when I went to get it it had mildewed beyond repair. I want to do it again but have not started. I really should before the baby starts college! Time just flys by and I never seem to get to do the things I would like.