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View Full Version : which type of Glassine paper?


Mary Brigid
10-26-2006, 01:14 PM
Hi Everybody,
I have learned on WC about Glassine paper. It sounds great for interleaving or protecting paintings when in storage or bringing them to the framers. My problem is, that when I searched the online shops for the product there were 2 types. Glassine Interleaving Paper and Acid Free Glassine Sheets. Can you please advise me which one is the best for this purpose. I will be very greatful for your help with this.
Mary Brigid :wave:

Paula Ford
10-26-2006, 01:37 PM
Mary,

I think the one I use from Dick Blick's is the acid-free glassine. You can never be too careful.

Paula

Paula Ford
10-26-2006, 01:45 PM
http://www.dickblick.com/zz173/18/

:D

Mary Brigid
10-27-2006, 05:17 AM
Hi Paula,
Thank you very much for the information on glassine paper and supplying the link for same. Paula it works out rather expensive with shipping costs. Is it possible to clean and reuse this paper?
Regards
Mary Brigid :wave:

Paula Ford
10-27-2006, 06:18 AM
I don't see why not Mary. If you just take a soft cloth and gently wipe away the pastel from the paper, it will be just fine.

Oh, I see now that you are in Ireland (what a gorgeous country!). Do you have some big art stores there that you can find glassine?

Paula

Mary Brigid
10-27-2006, 11:39 AM
Paula, thank you for the information. I have rang around the art shops to find they have no glassine paper in stock. But one in Dublin is going to order it for me.
Yes Paula Ireland is a gorgeous country. One just needs every shade of green doing landscapes :lol:

Paula Ford
10-27-2006, 12:45 PM
:lol: Yup!

Donna A
10-27-2006, 03:47 PM
What I've come to like even better than the glassine paper is 5 mil mylar (acetate.) Definately the heavy 5 mil rather than the thinner sheets. I found over the years that the pieces protected long term and hauled back and forth both in town and across the country several times as examples when demoing or doing workshops fared drastically better (perfectly!!!) under the mylar than under the glassine.

AND----it's clear, so you can see the work and still keep it protected at the same time!!!

Perhaps the best thing is that the glassine can become wrinkled so easily. And it is thin enough that it is a bit more difficult to protect from the wrinkling as it is folded back from the painting and replaced again. And it is sometimes not replaced in exactly the same place.

Either way, both the glassine and the mylar can be cut just a bit smaller than a good foam-core board, which is just a bit bigger than your favorite size of pastel paper, and you can reuse the board/cover time after time after time!!! It's nice to have several boards prepared with their covers, in different sizes if you work with various measurements. I even wipe off any pigment that has transfered to the inside of the cover sheet each time before folding it back over the painting. Less pigment seems to transfer to the mylar than the glassine.

Just as long as a cover sheet is used!!!

And if the cover sheet is trimmed slightly smaller than the board, it can be "hinged" to the top or side of the board with 2" clear packing tape, half over the front of the sheet, and folded back over the back of the board. And then a tape tab fastener or clips to keep the open side in place is good.

I always stretch out the glassine above the painting before laying it down on to the painting so that it is the most likely to go back in just the same place---and without wrinkles. Definately without the wrinkles!!!

Mylar probably lasts longer, but glassine is probably less expensive per square inch. Best wishes with whatever you use to protect your pieces!!! Donna ;-}

Mary Brigid
10-27-2006, 06:27 PM
Donna thank you for taking the time to explain about myler acetate to me. I am a little confused when you say "cover" Am I understanding it correctly ? Place the painting on one piece of foamcore. Cover it with the myler acetate, and then place another sheet of foam core on top? Sorry about my confusion Donna. I am useless with instructions. Imagine what I would be like with the instructions to assemble a flat pack!!!!!! :eek:

Donna A
10-27-2006, 08:45 PM
Donna thank you for taking the time to explain about myler acetate to me. I am a little confused when you say "cover" Am I understanding it correctly ? Place the painting on one piece of foamcore. Cover it with the myler acetate, and then place another sheet of foam core on top? Sorry about my confusion Donna. I am useless with instructions. Imagine what I would be like with the instructions to assemble a flat pack!!!!!! :eek:


Hi, Mary! In this case, I'm talking about pastel paintings which I am working with in my studio ---or have finished and not yet framed----as well as pastel paintings the artists who study with me bring to class. They can easily transport their paintings between home and class on one piece of foam-core board with the pastel painting paper taped down on the board. The glassine or mylar is tape-hinged to the board. That makes it possible to fold it all the way behind the board when it is on the easel for painting----and then can be taken off the easel and the glassine/mylar folded back over from the back to the front to cover up and protect the pastel painting when not on the easel. Does that make sense?

Somewhere, I've written an article about this for our MidAmerica Pastel Society newsletter---directions. I just found the illustration I scribbled about making the tab. Maybe that will be a help to you and others.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Oct-2006/77048-Tab--Pastel-Backing-Board.gif

This does not illustrate making the whole board, but you can see the layers of different materials, at least.

And it is so great to be able to reuse these boards as you remove and frame---or :-) burn :-) other paintings. (Well, we've alllll done some we hopefully did that to!) :-) Or---with the Colourfix---wash off and start again---or even reprime! :-) But the reuse of these boards with their glassine or mylar covers are very economical and last for years and years and years and sooo many different paintings.

Just be sure to not use regular masking tape to hold down your paintings----especially not leaving masking tape on a long time. I did that ages ago when I did not know. It dries up, turns brittle, discolors what it is taped to and otherwise is an unhappy experience!!!!! Wish I'd known before. If you can find the white Artists' Tape that is non-acid----it will be your friend. But that will not stay sticky for a tremendously long time. It will also dry up eventually, but no discoloring, etc. thankfully!!!!

Best wishes!!! Donna ;-}

Mary Brigid
10-28-2006, 01:12 PM
Thank you so very much Donna for your time, trouble and patience. I understand it perfectly now.
With Best Regards
Mary Brigid