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View Full Version : What do you think of Process Cyan? (new color)


Ian Bruce
10-22-2006, 11:18 AM
Winsor and Newton has a new (don't know how new) color; Process Cyan. I have heard of it before, as it is the primary blue used in the printing trade--supposedly the closest color to a true primary blue that has yet been formulated. I picked up a tube. The color is quite startling and I have not done anything much with it yet. Has anyone had a lot of experience with Process Cyan and any suggestions about what are its strong points and weaknesses? What color mixes is it good for? Do you like it?

Keith2
10-22-2006, 12:52 PM
I've tried it as part of a "spectrum colour" set used for demonstrating the colour wheel. It's Ok for that purpose, but for other subjects it's a cold blue green that takes a lot of getting used to.

Give me ultramarine blue and forget the rest !

Einion
10-22-2006, 01:02 PM
Winsor and Newton has a new (don't know how new) color; Process Cyan.
If this is in the Galeria line it's been available for some time. D-R have one too in their System 3 line.

I have heard of it before, as it is the primary blue used in the printing trade--supposedly the closest color to a true primary blue that has yet been formulated.
Just to note: tube paints of this name, as a rule, tend to be lightish in value to simulate (in masstone, the colour of the paint used thickly) the colour you see when cyan ink is applied to paper. This is always in a very thin layer, so we're not actually getting something that's the true equivalent of process cyan. For example here's a list of the pigments used in one set of process inks on the market:
AAOT Yellow 14, PR57:1, PB15:3, and Carbon Black.

The 'blue' here is Phthalocyanine Blue GS, which as you probably know is quite blue in masstone (which is much like cyan printing inks look like when you see them in their tubs). It's only when spread very thinly on a white ground that the cyan-like colour is seen since this pigment is blue in masstone but has a cyan undercolour.

IWhat color mixes is it good for?
Since it's much like a tint of Phthalo Blue GS that should give you some pointers :)

Do you like it?
For painting? Well I wouldn't want to be without Phthalo Blue GS but only as part of my normal palette, featuring as it does a mixture of opaque and transparent pigments.

A true primary palette has only transparent/semitransparent pigments - equivalents of CMY inks - and while you can certainly paint with them (and very well, look at Chuck Close's large-scale portraits done using CMYK) I personally prefer not to have to work only transparently.

Einion

timelady
10-22-2006, 01:25 PM
A friend uses a primary cyan for his acrylic airbrushing so Golden must have something similar? (I see a Pthalo Blue GS in their airbrush range, so that must be it.) He swears by primaries, black and white and makes stunning paintings. :) But I find his colour a bit dull for my own work - not the at all say that the colours on their own are! Must just be the way he works, sticking with CYMK isn't for me.

But his work shows that you don't have to keep it so vivid blue. Here's some of his work: http://www.starkgallery.com/terry-watts.html

Tina.

Ian Bruce
10-22-2006, 11:54 PM
Thanks for all the replies! I don't see myself using cyan straight. I will try a bunch of mixes and see what I get. Odd color.

a. ladd
10-24-2006, 12:04 PM
The CMYK colors are the "process" colors of 4 color printing - they are really made to be layered somewhat transparently in darkening succession (YMCB). Maxfield Parrish understood this process and layered his painting the same way for maximum glow and intensity in reproduction.

BTW: you'll notice that the cyan/blue is the only ink that doesn't appear to fade on those 4 color posters left too long in shop windows! :)