PDA

View Full Version : Atelier Interactive slow drying acrylic, buy how?


spiggle
10-18-2006, 12:08 AM
In a rather long thread called New Acrylic Paint I learned of a new acrylic paint called Atelier Interactive. http://www.chromaonlinenew.com and would like to try it. I have downloaded the PDF files for the color chart and such but do not know if I can buy it from their website or if I have to buy it at a specialty store. Dick Blick does not sell it or at least it doesn't list it under Atelier Interactive. Jerry's Artarama don't sell it either. Is there some special wholesaler I could get my local art store to order from?

This paint would allow me to paint wet over dry as usual but then on the final layer or so I could do a blending session not unlike oils. If spritzed with water the paint is workable and moist for a long time.

spiggle
10-18-2006, 01:05 AM
I guess the link to Jerrysartarama was an old one because this one now works:
http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discou...art-supplies/5

But these paints are EXPENSIVE. $7.00 for a tube? Sometimes more? Can these things be mixed or do we have to buy all shades like you do with pastels?

Sounds like an awesome product but the price is just too high.

Howard Metzenberg
10-19-2006, 05:00 AM
We have talked about carrying this product. We have a consultant (a professor at a nearby art school) who evaluates new products for us, and I was in the room as she tested it.

We were quite concerned about how different this product really is from other acrylics. It would require very different techniques, and a big learning curve for artists who already work in the medium. And they are indeed expensive. So the result was, we didn't jump on this new product immediately. We are taking a bit of time to evaluate it.

Howard Metzenberg
Dick Blick Art Materials
Highland Park, IL

Charlie's Mum
10-19-2006, 06:43 AM
We were quite concerned about how different this product really is from other acrylics. It would require very different techniques, and a big learning curve for artists who already work in the medium. And they are indeed expensive. So the result was, we didn't jump on this new product immediately. We are taking a bit of time to evaluate it.
That's good info - thanks Howard.
They are available in England - I think I saw them in a store last week - but haven't thought to try them yet.

Could you post us any further info as you get it please? - we could then put it into our Information Kiosk - I know there have been questions about this in the forum already. Thanks :D

Serenity
10-19-2006, 05:59 PM
I use the Atelier Interactive more so now than I do my regular acrylics and I LOVE them! To be honest, I don't work any differently with them than I do with my regular acrylics....I have always worked in layers and continue to do so. They seem to work just fine. The notable difference for me is the longer drying time they offer which is a huge benefit when it comes to blending. However, taking that into account the finished painting does take a little longer to dry completely so care in handling is a must.

As for mixing with other acrylics, it is possible but as the manufacturer states, the Interactive will lose it's longer time for blending capabilities and take on the basic characteristics of a regular acrylic. :)

Note - From what I have read in WC, some artists try them and love them while others try them and don't like them at all so I think it really boils down to personal preference. What works for some may not necessarily work for others.

a. ladd
10-20-2006, 01:56 PM
Actually, comparing the discounted web prices between standard Golden heavy body & Interactive, there isn't that much difference. Especially when you consider the Interactive 80ml tubes give you approx 33% more paint than 2 oz. tubes (though it is "creamier" or maybe "runnier" than other heavy body acrylics).

Howard Metzenberg
11-15-2006, 03:14 PM
We bit the bullet and ordered them. They will be on our website in a few days.

Now I am looking for threads here on Wet Canvas, and other on-line resources as well, that can help our Product Information group (the ones who answer the phone when you dial 1-800-933-2542) get ready for a deluge of questions. They will want to know, what kind of questions are people going to ask?

Any suggestions?

Howard Metzenberg
Dick Blick Art Materials
Highland Park, IL

spiggle
11-15-2006, 06:58 PM
One of the questions would be how much of the interactive could you mix with your regular acrylics and still be able to blend.

These paints, per tube, are expensive and so some people are not wanting to buy all the colors they usually use. I did because I had sold two small paintings and my pastels so I had the money to do so.

And yes, aladd, you do get a large tube. But If I remember correctly the Grumbacher acrylics are 90 Mil and only $2.98 a tube at Dick Blick. MUCH CHEAPER than interactive. :)

Also, be ready for lots of questions on mediums. Do you really need them for the blending? How do I paint in layers and have the layers NOT interact until I am ready to blend in the last few layers?

You also should consider this product, please: http://www.multimediaartboard.com

:)

spiggle
11-15-2006, 07:08 PM
Also, this post is for any of the interactive company people: you might consider smaller tubes at smaller prices so that people excited enough to want to try a complete pallete of these paints could afford 'testers'. You could market it as 'testers' 20 mils? 10 mils? That'd be enough to do a small painting.

:wave:

lensman
11-15-2006, 07:37 PM
I haven't tried them but what what I've read I just don't see the point in using them when we already have available mediums that will extend drying time for regular acrylics...

Glenn

tubbekans
11-15-2006, 07:38 PM
I know a question. Does a hairdryer help them dry faster? It does regular, old fashioned acrylics, but how about these new fangled ones?

Chroma has a sampler box of the mediums and 6 tubes of paint they were selling over the summer when they announced them. They called it the Interactive Starter Kit. That was a good deal if they still have it. It had TiWhite, Mars Black, Crimson, Naples Yeller, Olive Green, and Pthalo Blue all in the regular size tubes, plus all 4 mediums and a spray bottle. That was a good deal if they still have it.

Plaza art sells them, although their website seems to be down just now:
http://www.plazaart.com/

Jerry's has them on this page:
http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/online/5616/art-supplies/5

spiggle
11-15-2006, 08:31 PM
I haven't tried them but what what I've read I just don't see the point in using them when we already have available mediums that will extend drying time for regular acrylics...Glenn

I've used some of these mediums and it doesn't work for me. I guess it is all in the way you use the paint and the humidity of your workplace. Many factors.

If you use a lot of paint on the brush then the mediums might work. I don't know. I paint in thin layers and want ALL THE CONTROL I can have over the paint.

And that is the point of these paints: control. I want acrylics that work the way I want them to work not me having to try to paint in a totally unlikable style just so I can use acrylics. Someone once said that it was silly trying to get acrylics to work like oils because they are two types of paint. I think he, or she, wasn't getting the point. I want the acrylics to work for me the way I want them to work and blend and such more like oils not necessaraly be oils. I don't want all the mediums, the smelly chemicals, all I want is more blending time. And even the word blending could mean one thing to one person and not what I mean yet blending is the best word I could use.

The point is, I don't want to be having to paint YOUR way with acrylics or accepting the paint's limitations for lack of a more workable paint.

:D

Tiasa
11-17-2006, 02:12 PM
My questions would be:
1. How long before the paint is totally, completely dry. Sometime I don't want the paint to lift.
2. Is it archival?
3. Does it work well on canvas as well as paper?
4. It sounds like there are a lot of special mediums and binders that you must add to dry it or make it stick to the support. What happens if you don't use all those mediums?
5. Exactly how are the techniques different from regular acrylics? What are the 2 biggest differences?
6. Does anyone know how it is chemically different? What is in it? Detergent? Anti-freeze?? Other icky stuff?

mirizar
11-19-2006, 03:11 PM
I am using these new acrylics and I definitely like them. They are creamier than regular acrylics (more oil-like) but take longer to dry. In fact, they don't fully dry until a couple of days later (even when they feel dry to the touch). This is great when you want to do blending or if you want to remove a layer of acrylic after a few hours of painting it. Just wet it with a spritzer and use a palette knife to remove the paint. This actually produces very cool crumbling-wall like effects. I enhanced this effect by brushing transparent paint mixed with gel medium and love the final result!!! The problem with these paints taking so long to dry is that they remain very sticky for a few days and you may loose some of the paint around the edges if you store your canvas vertically on your easel. Other than that I love them!

Michelle

mirizar
11-19-2006, 03:13 PM
Another thing. If you use a fine mister to keep the painting from drying you can just do it in the first few minutes. After that you will start lifting the paint, which produces very neat results, but may not be what you wanted.

Michelle

theonoe
11-21-2006, 04:41 PM
Howard,

Have you decided to classify Interactive as "acrylic" paint? I seem to remember that in a previous post you wondered if it actually should be classified as a different type of paint.

Theonoe