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GregS
10-17-2006, 03:40 PM
I've attached a couple of my early tries at acrylic painting. I have tried to paint a number of other types of subjects such as still life and landscapes with far less success. Drawing with graphite or charcoal is definitely easier that painting with brushes!

Anyway, I'm still at the point where I'm learning the feel of the the actual applying of pigment to canvas - both with and without gel medium. I'm also still very much just experimenting with color mixing. I don't want to have to buy 87 different tubes of paint to get 87 different colors, but my trial and error efforts will eventually pay off.

Both paintings are 18" x 24". Any and all comments and suggestions (especially suggestions:) ) are very much appreciated.

Lady Carol
10-17-2006, 06:43 PM
The learning curve takes a bit of time with all media, for the majority of people. You should have to buy 84 different tubes of paint either. The basic range should see you through for the majority of mixings.

Both paintings are very interesting and different in their own right. The irish knot must have taken a lot of patience to get that sorted out. Not sure I would be able to do that.

dreamz
10-17-2006, 07:49 PM
I agree with Carol about the learning curve, it takes a while to get comfortable and find a style that works for you. Even then we continue to learn. Both of these are very nicely done, personally they would have driven me crazy:lol: Have fun, explore.. and welcome to WC

rmc
10-18-2006, 08:27 AM
Hi - welcome. Your paintings are superb- Love the celtic knot - you've got great hands and concentration to do this so well!!!
Enjoy - I also am newish and have discovered that the adage of buy the best paints you can afford is so true - you will find that using a basic pallete will be your best bet to learn not only how to mix colours, but to produce a harmonious painting.

Just experiment - trial out your colour mixes first / do charts of shades and mixes will help your learning curve.

Another thing is photograph your work and convert the images to grey scale. As you are used to working in graphite and pencil - this may help too in introducing colour to your work.

Another thought is look up the threads on glazing / underpainting / graisille in the classroooms or elsewhere- these might be a more natural way for you to work with still life etc, by painting a value map first and getting the structure right before thinking about colour - which you will add in subsequent layers. Have fun!!!

idcrisis55
10-18-2006, 09:51 AM
I enjoyed both of your paintings. The first one reminded me of an old quilt. You have received some excellent suggestions and here is another thread to check out, a workshop by deadsam on Engraved Wall Illusions (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=366052) Seeing your Celtic knot reminded me of it and thought you might find it interesting.

Ann

GregS
10-19-2006, 08:31 AM
Hi - welcome. Your paintings are superb- Love the celtic knot - you've got great hands and concentration to do this so well!!!
Enjoy - I also am newish and have discovered that the adage of buy the best paints you can afford is so true - you will find that using a basic pallete will be your best bet to learn not only how to mix colours, but to produce a harmonious painting.

Just experiment - trial out your colour mixes first / do charts of shades and mixes will help your learning curve.

Another thing is photograph your work and convert the images to grey scale. As you are used to working in graphite and pencil - this may help too in introducing colour to your work.

Another thought is look up the threads on glazing / underpainting / graisille in the classroooms or elsewhere- these might be a more natural way for you to work with still life etc, by painting a value map first and getting the structure right before thinking about colour - which you will add in subsequent layers. Have fun!!!

Thanks for your comments and compliments. I had an art teacher at my local community college whose philosophy was to "cheat, take short cuts, and copy off your friends." :) On this piece I actually found this pattern and instructions on how to draw it on the internet. It took a lot of careful measurement and sharp pencils. I drew it on a piece of sketch paper then taped that paper to the canvas (after the ground was already painted). Then I used a sharp Exacto knife and cutout each section one at a time, carefully tracing the outline of each. Once the drawing was transfered to the canvas the painting part was not so difficult.

Just as an aside, I do agree with the above philosophy. The great art traditions of master classes throughout the Renaissance had students duplicating existing pieces to learn technique. And the Dutch masters used projection devices (mirrors and lenses) to get their perspectives exactly correct. At the bottom of it all, the end result is all that matters. So unless you're trying to pass off a forgery as an original, "borrowing" ideas shouldn't be a problem. After all, "imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."

Chloe_1
10-20-2006, 11:32 PM
Your first painting is very nice. The OM symbol surrounding the Lotus Flower, I presume.
You shouldn't have to buy so many different tubes of paint.
A good book on color mixing could be helpful
There are many books out there; but I could suggest you one that covers most medias,and I really like called COLOR MIXING FOR ARTISTS written by 4 successful artists. It's a complete reference for all artist showing how to create numerous colors in different combinations, using the minimum number of base colors.
Good luck..and have fun experimenting..;-)))