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trill4ian2
10-12-2006, 08:40 AM
Hi everyone! I noticed on this forum there hasn't been a real newbie post yet, so let me be the first :) I've dabbled in watercolours and oil pastels but haven't really felt comfortable. I really love the look of gouache and would like to pick up a few colours, but have really little clue as to where to start. So here are my questions.

1. Tubes or Pans? Does quality gouache come in pans as watercolours do? Will tubes dry on the palette, and can you rewet them again?

2. What kinds of brushes? I've got a few nice sables that I bought for WC, will these work?

3. What kind of paper? Can you use virtually anything? WC, oil, acrylic paper? Or do certain types work better than others?

4. Brands? Any favourite quality brands? Some to avoid?

5. Colours? I like working from a limited palette. Can I use the same colours that I would for WC? Which white is best?

6. Any downsides to using gouache I should know ahead of time? Lightfastness, chipping, toxicity, etc.

Thank you ever so much guys, I know I've asked a lot of bonehead questions, but I want to be prepared before I dive in. :)

term8or
10-12-2006, 09:02 AM
I'm really new as well, but I'll try to answer some of your questions;)

1. Tubes or Pans? Does quality guache come in pans as watercolours do? Will tubes dry on the palette, and can you rewet them again?

Personally, I've got both. Tubes for studio work, and pans for convenience in field. Tubes allow you to do many more effects & control the thickness of the paint you are applying better (plus less wear on the brush). Paint will slowly dry on the pallete, but just wet them down with spray. You can use dry paint by rewetting.

2. What kinds of brushes? I've got a few nice sables that I bought for WC, will these work?

Yes. Don't forget some hog hair as well (give a different texture)

3. What kind of paper? Can you use virtually anything? WC, oil, acrylic paper? Or do certain types work better than others?

You can use virtually any thick paper, especially WC, and you can also use canvas, linnen, cotten, and various boards. I've been using cartridge paper as a practice support with reasonable success (as long as I don't use a very watery a wash)

4. Brands? Any favourite quality brands? Some to avoid?

I'm using windsor & newton artist quality, and they are good enough for me;)

5. Colours? I like working from a limited palette. Can I use the same colours that I would for WC? Which white is best?
You can use the same colours as you use in WC, plus a white. You can mix them in the same way as WC, using white to tint the mix.

6. Any downsides to using guache I should know ahead of time? Lightfastness, chipping, toxicity, etc.
Same downsides as watercolur, although it is slightly more lightfast.

Alachua Artist
10-12-2006, 09:19 AM
1. Tubes or Pans? I didn't realize there were pans! Oh well. I use tubes - and go through a lot of them. I've learned how much I need so as not to let too much of the paint dry out in the pallet, but if that does happen, I can rewet it and continue painting.

2. What kinds of brushes? I use an array of brushes - some watercolor sables, stiffer boar bristles, liners, whatever. It just depends on the area of the painting I'm working on.

3. What kind of paper? I use mainly rice paper. But, I've painted on just about everything from illustration board to paper towels. It all works. I was stunned when I went to Paris and saw the paintings of Dega and Lautrec - they were painted on salvaged cardboard and used butcher paper!

4. Brands? I use Windsor Newton Designer Gouache. There really isn't much choice in the local stores, and I don't want to compromise color intensity in cheaper brands.

5. Colours? I work from a limited color pallet as well. I would think the names would be different for some of the colors. Experiment. That's part of the fun.

6. Any downsides to using guache? oh sure - but no surprises here. We're all going to die from our exposure to this stuff, but hey - what fun we are having, eh? :lol: Just keep in mind that gouache has a rather delicate nature (but then again, so do pastels) and needs to be framed under glass. It is very susceptible to moisture. It doesn't dry to a hard finish like acrylics, or even watercolor for that matter. And I DO NOT RECOMMEND GOUACHE VARNISH.

So with all that said, post your paintings and enjoy gouaching!
:wave:

Richard Saylor
10-12-2006, 08:13 PM
1. Use tube colors, at least while you are learning how to use gouache.

4. I've used Winsor & Newton, Maimeri, Holbein, Da Vinci, and M. Graham. I like them all.

5. I use a limited palette too. Titanium white is the best white.

BeeCeeEss
10-14-2006, 09:18 PM
Be careful about not scratching or damaging your painted gouache surfaces. It is very easily scratched. Also be careful not to get any oils or lotions from your hands on your painting surface or your gouache will not flow and adhere properly. I made a special lightweight cotton glove to wear on my right (painting) hand while I'm working with any water soluble paints like gouache or acrylics. I cut all the fingers out of the glove except for the pinky where I rest my hand on the painting surface. That leaves my other fingers free to grip my brushes properly. That's a tip I picked up from an illustrator's guide to using gouache.

If you intend to paint with heavy, thick layers of paint, you should choose only a rigid support. Gouache is brittle and can crack and flake easliy if the support is it painted on flexes or stretches. Watercolor paper is fine for thin applications of gouache.

Like watercolors, your gouache paintings should be matted and framed under protective glass.

Beverly

Richard Saylor
10-14-2006, 10:31 PM
I think gouache works better with distilled water than with tap water, although this may vary according to the mineral and chemical content of your tap water.

JamieWG
10-15-2006, 10:44 AM
I've used a few different artist quality brands and like all the ones I've tried. However, most of the brands have lightfastness issues with at least a few of their colors. Be sure to research the lightfastness tables and choose your limited palette from among the lightfast colors!

Jamie

ternik
11-16-2006, 11:56 PM
That's true Jamie...I have had the same experience. I finally got tired of all the changes in the tube products and as you say the lightfastness issues.
Since I like w/c, gouache and egg-tempera, I started using dispersions for many of the colors I need and then I fill in with pigments like cadmiums that are easy to disperse(but still a bit on the hazard side, if you are not careful). It is so easy and I get more control of what is in my paint. w/c and gouache are basically pigments and gum arabic; opacity is the major difference. For more than ten years I have been using dispersions from PigmentsPlus (they are not a hazard and they are user frindly);(...they have a demo clip on their 'mystery' page?....anyway check it out.