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blondheim12
03-26-2002, 03:34 PM
I'd like to have opinions on using wax mediums. I have seen several paintings done with encaustics and they are a lovely texture. I have ordered some beeswax from Studio Products and can't wait to try it. Opinions?advice?
Love,
Linda

Wendy Booth
03-27-2002, 02:43 AM
I heard that Gaugin (and I'm sure lots of other people) used wax to get that smooth flat look. I love that look, but haven't used oils yet, so I'm keen to know how this goes for you. Doesn't stand oil give that flat look too? What is the difference?

Sorry I can't be of much help, but I hope you'll keep us up to date on your progress.

G.L. Hoff
03-28-2002, 12:15 AM
Originally posted by blondheim12
I'd like to have opinions on using wax mediums. I have seen several paintings done with encaustics and they are a lovely texture. I have ordered some beeswax from Studio Products and can't wait to try it. Opinions?advice?
Love,
Linda

I've used wax medium off and on for a year or so and I must say that I love it. It dries quickly, has a nice, matte finish, and gives a really smooth feel to tube paint when mixed sparingly. Great stuff. Stand oil, of course, smooths out and dries glossy, not matte.

But you mentioned encaustic and of course that's different. The wax/pigment mix is applied using heat and solidifies almost immediately. I use a wax medium made with turps and beeswax that't different from beeswax pastilles.

Anyway, happy painting with wax medium. Be interesting to hear your experience.

Regards

Luis Guerreiro
03-28-2002, 06:10 PM
Gary,
Well said. There was a confusion about "flat" and "matt". Wax doesn't necessarily give a flat surface, but it will give a MATT surface.
Stand Oil levels out into a flat surface, that is, without texture, and imparts a high degree of GLOSS.
Luis

gnomes99
03-28-2002, 11:49 PM
I have done some encaustic work through art school. The method we used was to heat up the wax and add oil paint to it. This was done with tuna cans on a electric frying pan.

The most important thing to do is not to use any of the cadmium colours or Naples yellow because this gives off toxic fumes when heated.

When you let your heated wax cool down it becomes a block that you can reheat again which is very economical.

If there is anyone there who can advise on the paints or pigments they used it would be good, because I would like to get back into it too.

artbabe21
03-31-2002, 10:57 PM
Gary, are you referring to use of Dorland's wax medium? I have some and the fumes actually bothered me so I never messed with it again.

But I think the original question was regarding beeswax which I'd be real careful with due to the flash point being low. I have some that I've not tried as yet, but was told the best way to use it was by heating it in a small { it's a mini size} crock pot, and you don't have to worry about it getting too hot, but the crock should only be used of course for this. In fact leave it in there once unplugged until you heat it up for use once again.
Cathleen~;)

G.L. Hoff
04-02-2002, 11:40 PM
Originally posted by artbabe21
Gary, are you referring to use of Dorland's wax medium? I have some and the fumes actually bothered me so I never messed with it again.

But I think the original question was regarding beeswax which I'd be real careful with due to the flash point being low. I have some that I've not tried as yet, but was told the best way to use it was by heating it in a small { it's a mini size} crock pot, and you don't have to worry about it getting too hot, but the crock should only be used of course for this. In fact leave it in there once unplugged until you heat it up for use once again.
Cathleen~;)

Nope, the wax medium I have is from Studio Products (try their website to order)...but it's fundamentally beeswax and turps (I think), so it might have fumes that would bother you, too...as to encaustic, dunno a lot about that but does sound interesting.

Regards

Leopoldo1
04-03-2002, 12:05 AM
Originally posted by blondheim12
I'd like to have opinions on using wax mediums.

Wax medium is wonderful to use with your tube pigments. It can be made easily, but with some caution of course, due to the low flash point of turpentine. A recipe of 1 part turps to 1 part beeswax (wax pastilles) heated slowly over a low heat until each has throughly mixed well together. Pour, while still warm, into jars with lids. Add a bit of the cooled concoction to each paint nut on your palette and paint away. The beautiful matte sheen along with paint strokes that stay put, similair to the thixotropic nature of maroger can definitely be of a desireable nature.

Encaustic is achieved with warmth. A traditional ground is used on either canvas or panel. A coat of heated melted pure beeswax is applied to your painting surface, upon subsequent reheating, this helps to amalgamate the colors you apply on top of it.....L

blondheim12
04-03-2002, 03:50 PM
Dear All,
Thanks for your great advice and comments. I am using Belize Copal 4 parts to one part beeswax as a medium, as Rob advised. I melted the wax into the copal and it is a lovely medium indeed. Sets up very well, lovely colors and finish. I really like it.
Love,
Linda
http://pleinairflorida.org