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Ian Bruce
09-21-2006, 07:36 PM
I am a water-colorist who has just started a portrait class taught by an instructor who uses only acrylics--so I am giving acrylics a try. So far, I like it. It is very much a beginners class, and I am impatient and would like to jump ahead a little. I noticed that I was having some success using glazing while doing the exercises painting eyes, mouths, etc. I'd like to have a go at doing a full portrait before my next class. I would like to try using glazing techniques for this. Is it necessary to start with a single color under-painting--or can I use different color darks for areas of the face that show warmer or cooler shadows, and different color lights for areas that show cool (blue or green reflected light) and warm (yellow, orange) highlights--and then glaze over this with varying intensities and shades of flesh-tones?
This may be ridiculously ambitious for a total beginner (and possibly a totally wrong-headed concept), but I always like to jump in the deep end and risk catastrophic failure rather than work my way in slowly! I learn quickly that way.
Any and all advice and suggestions would be very much appreciated!

tbolt
09-21-2006, 09:35 PM
hi ian, maybe the portrait forum would help you out too.

dspinks
09-21-2006, 10:00 PM
. . . or can I use different color darks for areas of the face that show warmer or cooler shadows, and different color lights for areas that show cool (blue or green reflected light) and warm (yellow, orange) highlights--and then glaze over this with varying intensities and shades of flesh-tones?
Oooh, that sounds exciting! You're definitely on a track that should show quite interesting results.

Debra

Lady Carol
09-21-2006, 10:12 PM
I think generally one colour is used for an underpainting, however don't quote me on that. Basically anything can go at the end of the day. What works for you is what works. I know Mustcreate (watercolours) used a purple underwash that she modified to be either cooler or warmer in the same painting before she applied the top colours. Her paintings were just to die for, visually.

Richard Saylor
09-21-2006, 11:55 PM
...I would like to try using glazing techniques for this. Is it necessary to start with a single color under-paintingOptional.

The traditional grisaille underpainting is a detailed monochromatic rendering of your painting. This takes so much work that some people are hesitant to begin the glazing phase for fear of messing it up.

--or can I use different color darks for areas of the face that show warmer or cooler shadows, and different color lights for areas that show cool (blue or green reflected light) and warm (yellow, orange) highlights--and then glaze over this with varying intensities and shades of flesh-tones?Yes indeed.

There are no hard and fast rules about glazing (except in the minds of over-opinionated teachers). Experiment and discover what works for you. Also check out the portrature forum and see what others are doing.

Richard

Ian Bruce
09-22-2006, 12:24 AM
Thanks for the help and support. I will take the suggestion about asking these questions in the portrait forum. Thanks!