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View Full Version : Ideal set for a beginner to maybe sell work too though


junipaire
09-08-2006, 01:53 PM
Hi I'm a digital artist but now want to also experiment with acrylic painting and do some pop art canvases . I want to be able to sell hopefully these works so basically don't want to buy paints that are of not such quality however with not having painting traditionally since school I don't want to jump in at the deep end.

Basically looking for what paints people here paint with and what type brushes, I also want to know what canvases people use please.

If you would be so kind to help me , I have 120, yes I'm from the UK so I guess the manufacturers of USA paints may differ I dunno. if someone could tell me what best ways of spending the 120 would be in what paints , what brushes and how many, if an on desk easel would be OK or one that goes on the ground, I guess the size of canvas I want to be painting will be around 40 inch by 40 inch. what make of canvas do people use. And what else I will need

Really appreciate any advise anyone could give, being thinking about this for ages but finally feel like experimenting.

Cheers
Phil

timelady
09-08-2006, 02:09 PM
Phil - have a look at Great Art for canvases, they have very good prices and also occassional sales (they have some of the gallery wrapped ones on sale, can't remember the brand but think it started with an H). For paints Winsor & Newton is a good brand at decent price of artist quality. I don't know how prices compare to supplier to supplier tho as I don't use W&N so check out www.greatart.co.uk, www.jacksonsart.co.uk, and Atlantis at atlantisart.co.uk

Tina.

Einion
09-08-2006, 02:24 PM
Hi Phil, okay first off, size is important, and 40" x 40" is pretty big. The scale you intend to paint will make some difference in what kind of paint might be best to choose - large canvases can require quite a surprising amount of paint so you may need to weigh cost of the paint with quality; although personally I'd go with quality as the prime consideration not everyone would agree. The style may also be a factor in choosing a paint brand, as well as brush type and sizes, so can you post a pic or a link to something like you intend to do?

Since you have a limited budget, will you be buying online or retail?

There are a number of good artists' acrylics available commonly - the two obvious ones being Cryla from Daler-Rowney and Finity from Winsor & Newton - and if you buy in larger amounts the unit cost comes down but even a small palette won't be cheap if you're buying large tubes or jars/pots. There are a few decent studio ranges that you can get in London shops that aren't expensive for 500ml pots but aren't widely available elsewhere in the UK.

If you can find 40" x 40"canvases readymade then you may not need to buy any acrylic 'gesso', but if you stretch your own you will need some. Some people also like to apply a coat or two of their own primer to store-bought canvases to improve the surface to personal taste, commercial priming sometimes being a little slick.

Einion

junipaire
09-09-2006, 04:58 AM
Hi, thanks for the replies, seems it gets quite complicated that you need different paints for different art and different size.

well yeah 40 inch by 40 inch was just said cause I maybe will need a easil to accomidate that if I chose to do a bigger one sometime. Mainly I will paint on 24inch by 24inch. here is an example of what I plan to do, mainly pop art and abstract stuff.

With so much paint to buy and things you need it can be quite hard to know what is best, if anyone can say what brand works for them and what brushes they use andwhat easil is best to fit a 40 inch by 40 inch as max. I'd be most grateful.

I know its a limited budget but just 120 to get me the essentials and I can always add other things later.

Another thing is with good quality paint like the ones you mentioned like DALER ROWNEY CRYLA being 4.15 for a tube, how many colours do you have cause it could be expensive lol, how do people who sell on ebay and paintings go for little amounts like 20 how do they ever make any profit, are they using really dirt cheap paints, how long does a paint tube last like say on a 24 inch by 24 inch canvas.



Most grateful
Phil

junipaire
09-09-2006, 05:02 AM
it doesn't add my image for some reason with using insert image so I'm putting it as an attachment

jeff m
09-09-2006, 01:29 PM
If you want to paint solid areas of colour a small bottle of flow ehanhancer will really help, it will also save paint if you are on a budget. (one coat will cover and will be solid w/ no brush marks)
I think the E-Bay prices are just people clearing out what they don't want.

How long does a tube last...........
Well I've been painting for two winters and just started again, 40+ paintings and I have just had to get a replacement blue and a T.White.
I paint thinly, but I wasted a lot when I started trying to mix colours.

Edited to correct my bad typing (twice) but I edit my paintings more

Einion
09-09-2006, 02:54 PM
Hi, thanks for the replies, seems it gets quite complicated that you need different paints for different art and different size.
It's not that you need different paints, it's just that some might be more suitable for doing large areas purely in terms of cost, and some are more suitable in terms of smooth application and solid coverage, and so forth. So different factors can determine what brand/range is a better choice. For example, you could use cheap student acrylics like those from WHSmith and paint just fine but they're not ideally suited to certain types of painting as they're relatively transparent. Larry Seiler's acrylics are done with Galeria, which is a similar type of paint, and many people wouldn't be able to use it to do the same kind of painting.

Mainly I will paint on 24inch by 24inch. here is an example of what I plan to do, mainly pop art and abstract stuff.
Okay, that's a good start. In that case, if you're intending to paint with a brush, I would recommend a brand or range that provides good coverage - you want the paint to give you a solid colour in as few coats as possible, keeping the surface smooth and free from brushmarks, yes?

For paint, it's a shame you don't live in the US as there's a lot more choice there. In the UK you'll very likely find it's cheapest to order online.

For brushes I'd recommend you get a few cheaper synthetic flats, white polyester or nylon, as your main painting tools. You'll probably need one or two rounds too, again synthetics (like Dalon) are probably good enough, size 2 or 4 maybe. I would also suggest you get at least one decorator's brush (2" at least) from the local B&Q or somewhere like that, look for one that has fairly fine hairs if possible.

Another thing is with good quality paint like the ones you mentioned like DALER ROWNEY CRYLA being 4.15 for a tube, how many colours do you have cause it could be expensive lol...
Palette choice was another thing I was going to tackle once we had some more detail. Most professional painters don't have that many paints - palettes of 12-15 colours aren't unusual - and some make do with just four, three primaries plus white, although I wouldn't recommend that for you. Palette choices are highly individual but as for what's best for you I'd recommend you get opaque paints almost exclusively. Unfortunately this will mean cadmiums for both the yellow and at least one red, which aren't cheap. For the blue Ultramarine is probably your best bet initially although I'd recommend you get a phthalo blue too at some point - those are the two blues, and thankfully they're not expensive. Titanium White is one colour you need of course, and if you'll be using any black get Mars Black. What else to get is dependant on your experience with mixing colour and how much mixing you actually want to do.

Oh, while I'm on the subject of mixing I'd recommend you get a painting knife or palette knife if you go with a brand that's fairly thick. If you choose something a little more fluid then you can mix in containers by stirring - a paintbrush handle, old chopstick, piece of dowel, anything really will do. You can also mix thinner paints by shaking in a small jar.

...how do people who sell on ebay and paintings go for little amounts like 20 how do they ever make any profit, are they using really dirt cheap paints, how long does a paint tube last like say on a 24 inch by 24 inch canvas.
Buying cheap paint in bulk and painting on dirt-cheap canvas would be a good start. 'Low' profits will mean different things to someone in China and to us in the West :)

And remember setup costs, from scratch, tend to be steep. In one of my hobbies you can get by with just a few simple tools but to be able to tackle a lot of different tasks/challenges you have to have dozens of things available, which one generally just accumulates over time. It's much the same with setting up a studio; the costs of a good easel alone could swallow your entire budget I'm afraid! Once you have the basics though the ongoing costs can be are minimal - Chuck Close used about "a teaspoon" of black pigment a year doing his monumental B&W face portraits because he painted so thinly :D

...how long does a paint tube last like say on a 24 inch by 24 inch canvas.
Very variable: depends on the specific paint and on the painting. If there's a lot of red in a picture then you'll use a lot of it, and if the red you're using doesn't cover well you could use half a tube, easy.

Einion

Charlie's Mum
09-10-2006, 02:12 PM
As there's plenty of info given above, I won't add to it!
Re: your image uploading - make sure your images are medium compression, below 100k and in jpeg - should load with the Uploader tool then :D