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celticrichard
08-27-2006, 09:53 AM
Hi thereĦĦ

Im back with a cold that doesnt allow me much drawing.

Thing is Im doing a big celtic knotwork and myth drawing in ink,its chinese ink,it keeps blocking my quill point,
Any suggestions?

Merry Scribe
08-28-2006, 08:43 AM
Hi thereĦĦ

Im back with a cold that doesnt allow me much drawing.

Thing is Im doing a big celtic knotwork and myth drawing in ink,its chinese ink,it keeps blocking my quill point,
Any suggestions?

Richard chinese ink is like a paint and it dries fast this is why it is blocking your quill point. Chinese ink is designed to be used with a brush not a quill. If you want to use Chinese ink with your quill you need to water down the ink. Better yet if you want to use something like Chinese ink that will not block you quill use guache it will give a bettter result.

Blessed Be Brian

scribblet
09-10-2006, 10:15 PM
Hi thereĦĦ

Im back with a cold that doesnt allow me much drawing.

Thing is Im doing a big celtic knotwork and myth drawing in ink,its chinese ink,it keeps blocking my quill point,
Any suggestions?

I like chinese ink but it stinks. One that comes recommended from a few people I know is Best Ink, it can be mail ordered. Or of course you can grind your own, very time consuming, it needs music to grind by of course :)- Try adding a drop of gum arabic as well as water (distilled).

Are you using real quills, and do you cut them yourself?

Alex22
09-16-2006, 07:28 PM
I tried once chinese ink,but I didn't like it.

xinsheng
10-01-2006, 12:52 PM
hi, I am a chinese calligrapher , I don't think it is stinks except you used a poor quality one.I have used the chinese ink for 30 years , painting or for chinese calligraphy it is perfect. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Oct-2006/91801-P5180197.JPG

callibeth
10-02-2006, 09:19 AM
There are so many kinds of Chinese ink, a blanket statement about it is impossible. This applies especially to pre-mixed ink in a bottle, some of which has lacquer in it. If your bottle of ink has lacquer, then it will dry waterproof on your quill (and it will corrode a metal nib).

My favorite pre-mixed ink is labeled KY6, made by Yasutomo. John Neal Bookseller sells it as Yasutomo Sumi. A close second is Boku-Eki, which is a little thicker but dries darker and shinier. I recommend that you go to JohnNeal.com and look at what the catalog has to say about each of the inks.

I got a bottle of Best Ink (John Neal sells it too). I found it to be gloopy and rather brown.

But really, if you're using a quill, I'd recommend grinding your own. You can control the fineness of the grind and the dilution of the ink, and to write with it is a lovely velvety feeling you don't get with bottle ink. Many ink sticks makers are looking to get a wide, smooth range of black-to-gray for sumi-e painting, and so some middle-quality ink sticks might have sacrificed a very black back for a full range of grays. This is not what we Western calligraphers are looking for. For a first stick, I'd recommend you buy the one that John Neal sells, since it was chosen with Western calligraphers in mind.

I have that stick, but it's not my favorite. My favorite, however, is not being made anymore. In fact, I don't think anyone is even making that *kind* of ink stick anymore -- wood-ash-based -- because it uses so much wood to make. Sticks today are made from oil ash.

P.S. I'm not affiliated with John Neal Bookseller in any way, except that I've been happy with their service for something like 20 years now.

scribblet
10-09-2006, 08:36 AM
Hi: There is (or maybe was) an excellent ink stick by Boku-Undo of Japan, they also made coloured sticks all excellent quality. I don't know if they are still available at John Neals or anywhere else but I remember these from Reggie Ezell's year long calligraphy class.

http://www.boku-undo.co.jp/HP/erub.htm

prairie painter
10-17-2006, 11:39 PM
I love the Chinese ink sticks, the whole process of grinding the ink in a stone is part of the experience. Use general black ink if you want to use a pen, Chinese ink just isn't made for that. Many sticks have an adhesive substance in them necessary for water-ink painting, helps to keep the ink on the backside of the rice paper from running when colors are applied on the other side.

scribblet
11-13-2006, 01:25 PM
I love the Chinese ink sticks, the whole process of grinding the ink in a stone is part of the experience. Use general black ink if you want to use a pen, Chinese ink just isn't made for that. Many sticks have an adhesive substance in them necessary for water-ink painting, helps to keep the ink on the backside of the rice paper from running when colors are applied on the other side.

Lots of other unknown substances in them too, some poisenous.

Don't forget the music to grind by while getting it ready :)