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JamieWG
08-22-2006, 10:40 AM
What are your favorite supports for egg tempera? Let's create a reference thread for archival supports that members buy or make for this traditional medium. I know nothing about egg tempera, so I need all the info I can get!

Jamie

spellbreaker
08-23-2006, 06:32 PM
The best supports for egg tempera are wood or masonite, because egg tempera turns very hard, like stone, with time. If you put egg tempera over a canvas, the painting will crack in time with the movement or rolling of the canvas.

JamieWG
08-23-2006, 06:37 PM
Spellbreaker, welcome to Wetcanvas, and thank you for your input! Can it also be used with canvas glued to wood or masonite? Can it be primed with either oil based gesso or acrylic primer, as if for oil painting?

Jamie

Richard Saylor
08-23-2006, 06:51 PM
Probably any support which is archival for tempera would also be good for casein, since it gets brittle as it cures.

Richard

spellbreaker
08-23-2006, 06:55 PM
Thank you for your welcome. It can be used with canvas glued to wood or masonite, but it must be primed with traditional thin gesso, without any kind of oil. You can experiment it too with an acrylic primer, but my experience is that is not better result that the one with traditional thin gesso.

deadsam
08-23-2006, 07:24 PM
I use masonite (no oil in it) and rabbit skin glue with marble chalk as a gesso heated up and painted and sanded, never had an issue with this.

spellbreaker
08-23-2006, 07:36 PM
I use too rabbit skin glue or grenetina, with titanium oxide and calcium carbonate, is an exellent gesso for all techniques

dbclemons
08-23-2006, 08:00 PM
Grenetina? That's a gelatine, isn't it?

spellbreaker
08-23-2006, 08:07 PM
Yes, It is. 70grms. of gelatine or rabbit skin glue hidrated in one liter of water 24 hours before heat it in order to disolve the gelatine. Then disolved and heated without letting it boil, add one portion of titanium oxide and revolve, then a portion of calcium carbonate and revolve, and on and on until it seems like comertial vynil painting for walls. Then put it on the wood or the masonite with a brush.

Starrpoint
08-29-2006, 10:06 PM
Where would you get this rabbit glue and such? I have heard others talk of the rabbit skin glue and marble dust but have no Idea of where to get it.

Richard Saylor
08-29-2006, 10:55 PM
2006-2007 Dick Blick Catalog p. 96 -

Gamblin Rabbit Skin Glue, 1 lb. - $15.79.
Fredrix Powdered Marble Dust, 4 lb. - $4.59.

richlll
08-29-2006, 11:55 PM
I use masonite (no oil in it) and rabbit skin glue with marble chalk as a gesso heated up and painted and sanded, never had an issue with this.
This is exactly right, btw, never use acrylic gesso with egg tempera.

See:
http://www.eggtempera.com/supports.html
"Acrylic primer is considered not compatable with egg tempera."

RS Glue, french chalk and zinc or titanium white is a perfectly smooth and slightly velvety ground for egg tempera, I've also tempered 140+ lb. watercolor paper with alum and painted on it for some quick work.

Richard Saylor
08-30-2006, 12:17 AM
...I've also tempered 140+ lb. watercolor paper with alum and painted on it for some quick work.Unless it's a trade secret, how do you temper the paper with alum? Thanks.

Richard

richlll
08-30-2006, 12:44 AM
Unless it's a trade secret, how do you temper the paper with alum? Thanks.

Richard

Hi Richard: No secrets here, usually size made from hide glue is a 10% solution, for sizing paper use a 3% solution, for a quart of this add a 1/4 tsp. of alum, use the solution as a bath for the paper and hang on a clip to dry, I saturate the paper. If you get some buckling I would press it between a couple sheets of newsprint when it is still damp, not dripping but damp in that you can feel it is cool with the back of your hand. I am just getting into all of these old ways of doing things and have become obsessed with seeing what works.

Get this book and you will lose days of sleep: Formulas for Painters by Robert Massey.

Rich

Richard Saylor
08-30-2006, 12:59 AM
Hi Richard: No secrets here, usually size made from hide glue is a 10% solution, for sizing paper use a 3% solution, for a quart of this add a 1/4 tsp. of alum, use the solution as a bath for the paper and hang on a clip to dry, I saturate the paper.Thanks, Rich! I'll get the Massey book.

Richard

JeffG
08-30-2006, 08:41 AM
Traditional RSG (bunny glue) gesso on a rigid substrate is pretty much the only way to go with ET painting. If one works very thinly, like watercolor with minimal layering, I suppose one could do sketches on paper or illustration board with it; but if thats the case, why use ET?

Supplies for making your own panels are readily available on the internet throught the major suppliers (Dick Blick (http://www.dickblick.com/zz004/56a/), Daniel Smith (http://www.danielsmith.com), Studio Products (http://store.studioproducts.com/product.php?productid=16168&cat=255&page=1)) or through a decent art supply store (Fredrix or Gamblin RSG and whiting etc.). Some people find they enjoy making their own, and some (like me) would rather get on to painting.

Commercially available pre-made panels are hard to come by, but God bless the internet. The only ones I've found are:
1. Max Howard at www.realgesso.com (http://www.realgesso.com) offers excellent panels at good prices.
2. A product called "Claybord" by Ampersand works ok. Its a bit slick and paint applied to it can be prone to lifting, however. It's not really RSG gesso, but an absorbant clay mixed with acrylic primer. The biggest plus is that it is widely available at most retailers and art or craft stores, so if you just want to give ET a try, its not a bad starting point. Whatever you do, don't confuse it with another Ampersand product, "Gessobord", which is acrylic-primed and NOT suitable for ET.
3. "Panelli A Gesso" (http://www.jerrysartarama.com/art-supply-stores/online/4139) are available from Jerry's Artarama. I bought some once and didnt really like them. An uneven surface with lots of pinholes, and a plywood backing that didnt seem stable to me.

An artist in my area, Katharine Steele Renninger was a casein artist who would work on linen canvas that was glued to board (I assume). She painted thinly and "scuffed" the surface so that the weave of the canvas was obvious, giving the work an antique look. I'd think one could do the same with ET. See the examples at
The Michener Museum site (http://www.michenermuseum.org/bucksartists/artist.php?artist=203)

AriadneArts
08-30-2006, 10:03 AM
I've used RealGesso panels for awhile now, and am very happy with them. They will even custom cut at a reasonable price. I, too, am more happy when painting than I am when preparing to paint, but as a foody and cook, I can truly understand the 'from scratch' approach. Well, I guess that's what I do with my paints, though--I grind my own pigments, add fresh egg yolk and a drop of oil of cloves. I enjoy the process.

P.S. And I heartily second the person who said Never to use acrylic gesso with egg tempera--two different animals.

dbclemons
08-30-2006, 11:19 AM
Not all rabbit skin glue is of equal quality. Bad RSG can smell awful when mixed up. The better variety seems to be the powdered form rather than the small pellets. The last bag I got was from Sinopia (http://www.sinopia.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=88)and it mixes well.

richlll
08-30-2006, 01:06 PM
I suppose one could do sketches on paper or illustration board with it; but if thats the case, why use ET?
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True enough. For archiving a piece it should be mounted on board, sometimes when I work I tend to be more careful on board, ... but on paper....let it fly! Then if I like it I can mount it. Rich

Meisie
08-30-2006, 01:07 PM
Jamie, I assume this will become a sticky? I hope to need the info soon ;)

Meisie

JeffG
08-30-2006, 03:21 PM
...I grind my own pigments, add fresh egg yolk and a drop of oil of cloves...

Whats the oil of clove do for ET? I know used in oil paints, it extends open time. Does it serve the same purpose here?

AriadneArts
08-31-2006, 08:51 AM
The oil of cloves is basically a preservative (egg tempera can be attacked by little vermin over the years), and it may extend open time, some, as well.

JeffG
08-31-2006, 08:56 AM
The oil of cloves is basically a preservative (egg tempera can be attacked by little vermin over the years), and it may extend open time, some, as well.

Ah, thanks. I am having a silverfish problem on some pieces when I set them to cure, right at the end stage after I put a coat of dilute yolk "varnish" on them. They seem to like to nibble at the edges at that stage, but lose interest when it hardens after a week or so. I'll try adding that to those coats.

AriadneArts
08-31-2006, 09:01 AM
Oh m'gosh! Thanks for sharing that, Jeff. I haven't had any problem yet. Maybe the oil of cloves is why. Do let me know how it works.

AriadneArts
08-31-2006, 09:03 AM
Meisie, Good idea. I've just sticky'd this thread (assuming Jamie doesn't mind).

Jamie, I assume this will become a sticky? I hope to need the info soon ;)

Meisie

Meisie
08-31-2006, 06:05 PM
Thanks Eileen! :clap:

I would think the oil would work really well. Never thought of adding that! It is great to know! :D

Meisie

andymathis
09-01-2006, 09:30 PM
I have played with egg tempera on mounted paper, using it transparently like watercolor. Frame it behind glass, or seal and varnish over the top with no glass.

Glad to find this forum as I usually never go to the home page.

studiogarcia
12-06-2006, 08:42 PM
I use and love panels made by a company in Sant Fe called True-Gesso-Panels. They are traditional gesso panels made specifically for painting in egg tempera. the surfaces are a bit smoother than my own self-made panels but work just as nice, and I can get to paint much faster since I don't have to fuss with creating the actual support.

You can get them at www.true-gesso-panels.com. Eric (the owner) will even send you a free sample to test it out.

artbyjune
12-08-2006, 11:21 AM
Ready made true gesso panels must be good when you want to get cracking on a painting. I'd like to try those sometime. I've used hardboard (masonite) panel with traditional glue/gesso to date. But I have recently glued a piece of Daler ivorex paper to foam core board and plan to try this out with E.T. to see how it goes. I'll let you know!

valnorb
12-20-2006, 02:26 PM
What in the world is wrong with Clayboard smooth, 1/8", C'mon guys, it's year 2006, not 1690, goodness, leave the poor rabbits in their cages to breed and eat and whatever, have fun. Get Clayboard smooth and be on your way. I think that all that tempered masonite with the plaster on it is extremely heavy and also hard to store in my 3.5 ft. tall wooden printer rack that I keep about 8 portfolios (large) in. I'm all for letting somebody else do the supports and the framing (and cut off their poor fingers not mine, thank you very much). I'm the painter, not the support-creator, leave that job for the hacks. Later. Much later. [Better is the corner of a housetop than a wide house with a contentious woman - Proverbs, the bible][Better is a dry crust with peace and quietness than a houseful of sacrifices with strife - Proverbs, the Bible.]

dbclemons
12-20-2006, 03:30 PM
Ampersand's products use acrylic polymer, and as such, they are less than ideal for egg tempera, that includes Claybord. It's the same as their Gessobord except they use clay instead of marble dust. Making traditional gesso is fun for me, but I may be uncommon in that regards. My panels are by no means heavy from the gesso. I'm not plastering a wall.

artbyjune
12-31-2006, 02:44 PM
Painting with ET on ivorex paper glued to foam board gave me good results (comparable to panels).

I used this paper/foamboard combination unsized for a first attempt. I'll post a cat I did on this support in the forum. Actually, its in my signature at the moment...the white kitty.

I think the paper/foam board combo is useful for when you want to do a quick study in ET or for when you do not have a gessoed panel handy.

I have also gessoed another piece of this paper on foam board to try that. I suppose you could just size the paper/foam board support for similar results.

An advantage of this support is if you have to mail the painting overseas. Foam board is so light weight compared to panels.

However, having said all that, I think panels feel really wonderful to work on!!

ambrebrune
03-05-2007, 05:52 PM
My favorite support is wood with plaster. But I use gouache and tempera in a little spontaneous way...:wink2: http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Mar-2007/102875-Copie-de-Torse-en-noir-et-b.jpg

mendy1
03-10-2007, 05:17 PM
I have used gessogoard and smooth clayboard with success.

Eggy
07-05-2007, 08:11 PM
I agree with ambrebrune: wood. Did you mean gesso on wood ?

Kind regards,
Eggy

Sneuart
08-31-2007, 10:56 PM
[quote=artbyjune]Painting with ET on ivorex paper glued to foam board gave me good results (comparable to panels).

:confused:
I've never heard of ivorex paper, can you explain what it is and is it hard to find?

Thanks!

66bevbon
10-01-2007, 07:38 PM
Egg tempera can be painted on canvas, however. Look at the huge (and famous) canvases that have been painted in egg tempera, Bottechelli's "Venus" (standing in a sea shell) and the sister canvas "Primavera". These are in Florence, Italy and very impressive!

poetrypainter
11-09-2007, 07:24 PM
What about masonite prepared with Gamblin oil ground? Would the oil ground be a problem?

Andrewpainting
03-08-2008, 06:27 AM
Hi, I don't know how to do this thread business, being a 'new kid on the block' (what is the Quote button for?) Just a reply to 66Bevbon, the 'Primavera' is on wood panels. When I saw it in the flesh, so to speak, in Florence, I was amazed at how the panels were stitched together and not very flat, you could see the wood imperfections and texture quite well. And the 'Venus' is on Poplar wood panel, in London's National Gallery.

pinkrybns
03-08-2008, 07:20 AM
Hi, I don't know how to do this thread business, being a 'new kid on the block' (what is the Quote button for?) Just a reply to 66Bevbon, the 'Primavera' is on wood panels. When I saw it in the flesh, so to speak, in Florence, I was amazed at how the panels were stitched together and not very flat, you could see the wood imperfections and texture quite well. And the 'Venus' is on Poplar wood panel, in London's National Gallery.
Hit the quote button in the lower right of a post when you want to reply and you get the results I just did - where the person's post you want to respond to is shown in your reply. Type your message underneath (like I just did).

And you are so correct about the "Primavera" and the "Venus" being on wood panels ...thank you for pointing that out.

Judy

hot water
03-15-2008, 04:11 PM
please, Im new here, but love egg painting,cant even spell all the words! Its really wonderful stuff ! get on the computer, punch in on google cennino cennini before 1437 . right there is I think, all kinds of Info. I make my paint from [egg with daniel smith watercolors,brillant stuff] its a shortcut,but nice colors ,& safe,no dust,& quick. what color

MonaDC
03-17-2008, 07:09 PM
Nearly all the information covered in this thread is more thoroughly discussed in the Society of (egg)Tempera Painter's forum. I recommend also reviewing the information provided there on support panels, oil of clove, and all egg tempera topics, which is in-depth and detailed in numerous threads.

reeshoffer
05-21-2008, 10:15 AM
I would certainly like to get a definitive answer to this question: Is acrylic primer okay for use with tempera or not? I use acrylic primer on mdf and then egg tempera. I have read that it makes no difference and then I have read that it does make a difference. Who is right?

JeffG
05-21-2008, 11:08 AM
I would certainly like to get a definitive answer to this question: Is acrylic primer okay for use with tempera or not? I use acrylic primer on mdf and then egg tempera. I have read that it makes no difference and then I have read that it does make a difference. Who is right?

You're never going to get a definitive answer on that question that's going to come from a universal agreement. You have to look at the evidence supplied, look at the work and reputations of the people making claims, try it on your own, and ask yourself what you're willing to risk and put up with for the benefits you hope to gain.

After all, there is no consensus on whether MDF is a sound surface either. From a standpoint of long-term archival soundness in any art materials, there is very little absolute consensus, because there are so many variables.

reeshoffer
05-22-2008, 02:25 PM
Thank you Jeff.

I used mdf with acrylic primer but this weekend I am finally going to be able to buy the traditional materials, i.e., rsg & gesso etc.. So far I see no reason not to stick with mdf but I would like to point out that I first removed the wax from the mdf and coated it with mdf primer before applying the acrylic primer.
Since this is going to be my first try with traditional materials I could use lots of advice here. I figure I am going to have to remove the wax first before doing anything else. Is there anything else I should do with the mdf? I am thinking of painting one side of it with mdf primer to protect it from moisture but if anyone has any suggestions I would be glad to hear from them.

JLiszka
02-18-2009, 10:30 AM
What in the world is wrong with Clayboard smooth, 1/8", C'mon guys, it's year 2006, not 1690, goodness, leave the poor rabbits in their cages to breed and eat and whatever, have fun. Get Clayboard smooth and be on your way.

I agree, Claybord smooth is the way to go for us lazier types who like bunnies. I don't use sable brushes either (gasp!) and have had great results with synthetics.

JLiszka
02-18-2009, 10:45 AM
Hi, I don't know how to do this thread business, being a 'new kid on the block' (what is the Quote button for?) Just a reply to 66Bevbon, the 'Primavera' is on wood panels. When I saw it in the flesh, so to speak, in Florence, I was amazed at how the panels were stitched together and not very flat, you could see the wood imperfections and texture quite well. And the 'Venus' is on Poplar wood panel, in London's National Gallery.

Actually these are both at The Uffizi in Florence, I was there not long ago. Would hate to see someone fly off to the wrong museum, although National Gallery has a lot of Botticellis. Primavera is oil tempera on wood (ET w/some oil added), Birth of Venus is tempera on linen canvas, although the canvas appears to be mounted.

goldsteinjanet
03-12-2009, 07:08 PM
Hi All: I have recently become interested in using egg tempera, mainly because I love the vivdly intense and vibrant colours one can achieve with this medium. I am currently preparing my first support or frame, coating with a mixture of rabbit skin glue, chalk dust and calcium oxide, which is heated and then brushed onto the support. I was having trouble with the first coat, as it was gelling the moment I took it off the double boiler. I visited a fix-it shop where a very serious russian artisan, who's job is to restore antique pottery, told me to mix some honey and beer into the concoction. Well, I didn't have any beer handy(I prefer to drink mine), but I did have drop of honey, and Voila... the mixture became instantly smooth and creamy. So far, I have poured about 8 layers of ground, allowing each to dry thoroughly and then sanding the layer until it is almost smooth. I was told I have to layer up to 12 thin coats, then sand until it is satin smooth. I'll let you all know how it goes. If I had to rely on this for a living, as one did in the 15th century I would starve. I haven't started with the paint yet. That will be another steep learning curve.

goldsteinjanet
03-12-2009, 07:25 PM
thanks for all the good leads and advice guys. I'm learning so much. There is something to be said about learning from the experience of others. This way I am saving myself lots of time, by not falling into the wrong rabbit hole, so to speak. (please forgive the pun).:thumbsup:

JLiszka
03-16-2009, 01:02 AM
Welcome goldsteinjanet. I too am learning slowly, from a friend who has many years experience and also from the many books I have collected. So far I have liked my results although I am breaking RULES! Cennini would be rolling in his grave. I would be starving also.

hoakley
03-16-2009, 06:07 PM
Forgive me for questioning established dogma, but recent discussions elsewhere have set me in this frame of mind.

What are are reasons for using traditional gesso rather than modern acrylic 'gesso' on a rigid support such as a panel, for egg tempera (or casein)?

The ones that I have seen advanced or hinted at include:
- acrylic gesso is flexible; however if used on a rigid support, it is as rigid as the support is, surely?
- acrylic gesso does not bind as well to the medium; however modern acrylic gessos seem able to bind well to almost anything, so I would be interested to know how egg medium differs.
- acrylic gesso is not proven to be archival in quality; whilst this is strictly true, all the indications from long experience with acrylic paints is now that acrylic media are excellent keepers, far better than many traditional media, and superior to poorly made traditional gesso (or iffy glue in gesso).
- acrylic gesso is not as absorbent as traditional gesso; but there is conflicting advice about possibly sizing traditional gesso if it proves too absorbent.
- acrylic gesso does not impart the same lustrous quality; used properly with glazing, this does not seem to be the case with oils, at least.

Are there other good reasons, or has the dogma perhaps become a matter of purism, much like the fact that 'real egg tempera artists never used tubed paint'?

Howard.

JLiszka
03-18-2009, 10:00 PM
Forgive me for questioning established dogma, but recent discussions elsewhere have set me in this frame of mind.

What are are reasons for using traditional gesso rather than modern acrylic 'gesso' on a rigid support such as a panel, for egg tempera (or casein)?

The ones that I have seen advanced or hinted at include:
- acrylic gesso is flexible; however if used on a rigid support, it is as rigid as the support is, surely?
- acrylic gesso does not bind as well to the medium; however modern acrylic gessos seem able to bind well to almost anything, so I would be interested to know how egg medium differs.
- acrylic gesso is not proven to be archival in quality; whilst this is strictly true, all the indications from long experience with acrylic paints is now that acrylic media are excellent keepers, far better than many traditional media, and superior to poorly made traditional gesso (or iffy glue in gesso).
- acrylic gesso is not as absorbent as traditional gesso; but there is conflicting advice about possibly sizing traditional gesso if it proves too absorbent.
- acrylic gesso does not impart the same lustrous quality; used properly with glazing, this does not seem to be the case with oils, at least.

Are there other good reasons, or has the dogma perhaps become a matter of purism, much like the fact that 'real egg tempera artists never used tubed paint'?

Howard.
These are the two major ones, from what I have been told. You want an absorbent surface, almost like you would maybe use for watercolor, or a fresco, yet it must be stiff or else the egg cracks. I haven't tried acrylic gesso because I have been warned against it, same way watercolorists and oil painters are warned against using paper or canvas that isn't acid-free. You just stay away. I use old plastic lids (from anything that would otherwise end up trash) to mix my tiny paints in (has to be thrown away frequently) and I know et paints dont stick to the plastic lids at all. However, if I do a test strip on claybord smooth I have to scrape at it with my thumbnail to get it to barely flake a bit. So that is my educated guess: the binder will not stick to plastic/acrylic with any decent permanent bond.

hoakley
03-19-2009, 02:10 PM
Thanks for those comments. They are easy to substantiate, so I may play with some different acrylic primers and see how true the claims are.

Howard.

JLiszka
03-20-2009, 12:53 AM
Thanks for those comments. They are easy to substantiate, so I may play with some different acrylic primers and see how true the claims are.

Howard.

Let us know how your experiments turn out!

Bearlette
04-28-2009, 04:09 PM
What is the reason to put alum on WC paper?

Bearlette
04-28-2009, 04:12 PM
What is the reason for coating WC paper with Alum? (New at this stuff) Bearlette.

MonaDC
06-13-2009, 05:31 PM
The most ideal surface for egg tempera is rabbit-skin glue gesso panel. I use this for larger paintings in particular.

For my miniature painting, I paint with egg tempera on Kelmscott vellum. There can be some warpage if you apply the paint with too much water content, but for a very small painting area, this is a lovely surface, and it is secured under a matt and glass when framed.

I have also painted for most of my illustration career with egg tempera on Strathmore illustration board, and some of these paintings are still in great shape 25 years later.

Celadonite
09-22-2009, 08:37 PM
For my miniature painting, I paint with egg tempera on Kelmscott vellum. There can be some warpage if you apply the paint with too much water content, but for a very small painting area, this is a lovely surface, and it is secured under a matt and glass when framed.


Do you have to treat the Kelmscott vellum with anything before painting? What size work seems best suited to painting on vellum?

Do you mix your egg tempera differently for the vellum than for a gesso ground?

It's a wonderful idea, using vellum and I hope to try it soon, thanks!

Celadonite
09-22-2009, 08:46 PM
Has anyone tried using papyrus as a carrier for E.T.?

I saw a pic of an icon painted on papyrus in E.T. in a book by Solrunn Nes, so apparently it can be done.

Harry Seymour
11-17-2009, 12:35 PM
I use Claybord which has a wonderful obsorbancy quality that I like. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Nov-2009/131361-Eye-on-the-prize-wc.jpgHere is an example of a claybord painting --Eye on the prize -16x20.

Evelien1
09-13-2010, 04:17 AM
Hi there, I use either acrylic gesso (with caseine added), or a hide-glue/oil primer (homemade half-oil ground). But the latter is very absorbent, when I want it to stop absorbing, I seal it with dammar varnish. After that, I go over to oils.
I use egg-tempera on canvas, an underpainting for oils (they make sure the tempera remains flexible)

kiko2700
03-11-2012, 01:52 PM
Egg tempera looks and performs best on a flat panel, not on canvas or linen.

M.L. Schaefer
03-13-2012, 10:22 PM
Thank you StudioGarcia! My first time visiting this forum (wanted to learn more about E.T.!) But, alas, my heart shrank and my heart had tears at hearing that one must use bunny glue to make gesso priming boards.....But, a wonderful solution from you! I hope to add E.T. to my repertoire!

:heart: M.L.

karenlee
03-14-2012, 11:08 AM
I have been reading posts on the egg tempera forum from people who use egg tempera directly on watercolor papaer, no tempering. They say it's ok if you don't paint many layers.

scribblet
06-17-2012, 09:44 AM
Hi: I was interested in trying ET and was also wondering if anyone here has tried ET painting directly onto heavy W/C paper with no sizing .

Pandemonium
06-19-2012, 05:33 PM
If it's any consolation, most products labeled "rabbit skin glue" are really bovine in origin, so if you eat beef, you have no further cause for woe. If you are a strict vegetarian who never uses leather, then all bets are off.

aannggeell
01-09-2013, 02:14 PM
I used egg tempera paint on an, I believe, oil primed masonite. When I first started to paint it was leaving little dots. As though i was painting on something wet and it was not adhering. Then what I did was paint and wiped some of the the paint off in a circular motion. It was very effective for its purpose (the board served as a back drop) But now I'd like to be able to use the board for a more meaningful painting but not sure how to prepare it and what medium to go with, oil or acrylic?

karenlee
01-10-2013, 08:36 PM
Good luck on gesso making! My favorite ground is gessoed board but I am way way too lazy to do that; I get my prepared boards from True Gesso in Santa Fe. They also sell everything you need to DIY. What a wonderful outfit!

http://truegesso.com/cart.html

giancarlo80
03-19-2014, 12:55 AM
I'm a watercolor,pastel and oil painter and have done over 45 sketchbooks in my life. Done one egg tempera in my life and it was successful. I'm a lazy and cautious guy and when I read that you can poison yourself with the powdered pigment I said hey that's not for me.
I deal with a guy named Allessandro who works for a place called Kremer colors in NYC. He can answer any question you have. They sell all the powdered pigment you want and calcium carbonate and rabbit skin glue you'd want. My name is charles and you can see the one and only egg tempera I did on my website at charlessantopadre.com

giancarlo80
03-19-2014, 01:23 AM
I'm back and the name of the egg tempera is THE DINER

giancarlo80
03-19-2014, 07:43 AM
Maybe someone could help me. I wrote the stuff above about egg tempera and I have done many gouache paintings but I cannot show them because I'm a computer illiterate. For three or four days I unable to post my work because when I go to the posting page where the little mountain icon is and press it I get the scroll and download info page but keep getting the message that the image is too large and I have to re-size it. I continue to get the GIF file instead of the jpg file. and now it seems I lost all pictures.This new thread won't work. Not sure if my message comes through or not!

giancarlo80
03-19-2014, 07:50 AM
Had to re-post because I lost my edit button also.

giancarlo80
04-06-2014, 01:42 PM
I did an egg tempera of the interior of a diner and it's on my website at
charlessantopadre.com

giancarlo80
08-17-2014, 02:37 AM
I guess nobody wants to play

kathbarr
02-12-2015, 11:00 PM
There is one manufacturer in Italy that makes true gesso panels on poplar wood.
The panels are called Belle Arti and the company is P.E.R. Belle Arti.
They are good and not too costly.

olgadabrowska
03-23-2015, 08:15 AM
I recently started using egg tempera (Daler Rowney brand) as underpainting for oils and for this I use Ampersand panels - pastelbord and claybord. They are absorbent and smooth (well, pastelbord more toothy but still great surface).

jonquil
07-03-2015, 08:57 PM
My husband (an artist and art educator) is going to try egg tempera. We have chickens, and I'd like to see him create the tempera paint.. but we have never done it before! Following this thread. :)

Irene22
08-14-2015, 07:15 AM
Everyone wants to play! There are forums and threads on this huge web site which will help you with the technicalities of posting and adding photos. If you google jpg and other formats you will get simple information how to convert the tiff files. Generally people do not like to discuss items 'off the thread'

dreadedlocks
09-09-2015, 02:59 PM
I use masonite panels that I prepare myself. I size the panel with rabbit skin glue and then apply three layers powdered limestone mixed with the size. I've found that it is very important to size and prime both sides of the panel to prevent warping.

Thim
09-27-2015, 03:55 PM
I kind have taken an unconventional approach to this. I have spend the past few years experimenting and refining my system of recycling classroom paper from a local school. It allows me to have a textured surface which I'm able to manipulate to my liking. It also gives me a somewhat absorbent surface which helps me to achieve certain effects that I use in conjunction with the texture. I'm not sure if that makes much sense.