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PeggyB
08-21-2006, 04:43 PM
OK - I promised Charlye I'd demonstrate in pictures how a simple dust catcher can be made so here goes:

You can use any paper handy, but I happen to like waxed paper because it is thin and slippery so when I dump the dust into the jar I have for saving it, it falls easily out of the catcher - yes, I save dust. :lol: I use it to tone white papers or mix with sanded goop to add color to hand made paper surfaces.

1. Cut a length a bit shorter than the board on which you are going to tape your pastel paper. Waxed paper width is prefect, but if you must measure other paper, make it about 12 " wide. You don't have to be too exacting.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_1.jpg

2. Fold the paper in half, and then in almost half again - leaving about 1" at the top of the paper (this will go under your pastel paper on the board).
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_2.jpg

3. Open the fold, and turn the outer edges diagonally towards the fold. (like making a paper airplane!) On the left you'll see this step. Then turn in about 1" of the point. On the right you'll see this step, but it doesn't show up well here so see the picture on the right. A little more or less in this step isn't critical.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_3.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_4.jpg

4. Refold along the original fold, and tape the ends closed. Don't have the edges exactly even as you want a bit of a gap to form a catch cup.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_5.jpg

5. Use a thin tape such as Scotch tape to tape the dust catcher to the bottom of your board. You want a thin tape so there is no "lump" under pastel paper when you place it into the cup.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_7.jpg

6. Tape your pastel paper about 1/2" over the upper edge of the dust catcher. Tape the lower corners of the pastel paper down also.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_8.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher.jpg

Another way to keep the dust falling directly into the dust catcher is to slightly slant the easel upright forward. Here I've loosened the lower corners of the paper so you can more easily see that the easel upright is indeed slanted.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/68149-Dust_Catcher_10.jpg

I know some people go one step further because they don't save their dust, and want to make sure it stays in the cup. You can tape 2" masking tape to the inside fold of the cup. Or if you have some double sided tape, use several strips of that inside. That way the dust sticks to the tape, and you can easily throw it all away when finished. My way the dust catchers get used many times over as I just empty them and retape to my boards - I'm lazy! :D

Peggy

khourianya
08-21-2006, 05:18 PM
There are people here who have modified rain gutters and hung them ont heir easels to act as dust catchers. I've been meaning to do this too, but haven't found the time yet :)

There are a few threads out ther eon this, I just can't seem to search today. A quick search for dust catcher should bring up a ton of ideas too.

PeggyB
08-21-2006, 05:47 PM
There are people here who have modified rain gutters and hung them ont heir easels to act as dust catchers. I've been meaning to do this too, but haven't found the time yet :)

There are a few threads out ther eon this, I just can't seem to search today. A quick search for dust catcher should bring up a ton of ideas too.

True Cori, there are lots of ideas - but modified rain gutters? :lol: I can't imagine trying to haul that around while plein air or going to a class. My students all make one of these before they even start a session if they haven't already done so in a previous class. It is light weight, portable, inexpensive, and easy -

rain gutters - what will someone think of next?

Peggy

Charlye
08-21-2006, 06:19 PM
Thanks Peggy! Very clever. I know a certain someone who's going to need
an easel. It took a second to notice that the wax paper goes behind the
paper. It will work great, I'm certain. I bet aluminum foil could work too.
Keeping the dust... rainbow colored dust might come in handy. :)

Thanks. Charlye

PeggyB
08-21-2006, 06:58 PM
Thanks Peggy! Very clever. I know a certain someone who's going to need
an easel. It took a second to notice that the wax paper goes behind the
paper. It will work great, I'm certain. I bet aluminum foil could work too.
Keeping the dust... rainbow colored dust might come in handy. :)

Thanks. Charlye

Yes, aluminum foil will also work, but it creases more easily than waxed paper, and I happen to like mine as crease free as possible so the dust can flow more easily. Better warn your artist - there's nothing more disgusting than to have the little "funnel" of dust flowing nicely, and then have a child or dog come up and bump your arm! Believe me it is a mess & a wasted effort when it hits the floor! :envy: However, have Dany try both and see what she likes the best.

As for "rainbow colored" pastel dust, well you will soon see that when all mixed together it becomes various shades of gray unless you keep each color seperate as you use them, and I don't know anyone who is going to change the dust catcher every time you change pastel colors. I do have some that is all blue because I had bits and pieces of blue that for some reason all seemed to accumulate at the same time, and they are in a seperate container (wide mouthed containers are easiest to use). All I need to do to use them is crush them with a knife or the back of an old spoon or anything hard and smooth.

Peggy

Kathryn Wilson
08-21-2006, 07:14 PM
rain gutters - what will someone think of next?

Peggy

Yep, that's me and my imagination and the rain gutter works really well in the studio! I collect all the dust, brush it out one end, put it into jars and save it for making more pastels.

I'll see if I can find that thread :smug:

Post #142 in this thread: (pics too)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=275691&highlight=%5C%22rain+gutter%5C%22

nana b
08-21-2006, 07:36 PM
Good idea on the wax paper dust catcher! Might try it one of these days. For now I just hook a plastic bag (the medium sz from Hobby Lobby works great) on the bottom edge of the easel tray and blouse it out to catch the dust or throw used papers towells and simalar trash in. Then just tie it up whenever the mood strikes you and presto! :wink2: If you want to save the dust to make other pastels then just keep other trash out of it . Another idea to recycle plastic bags too. It's also pretty hard to accidently drop and spill with the plastic bags.

watergirl
08-21-2006, 11:22 PM
Great demo Peggy! I just have to remember to dump the saved dust before I pull the painting off, duh...

KJSCL
08-21-2006, 11:32 PM
Just thought I'd show what I use to catch dust. It's an inexpensive piece of corrugated plastic from the hardware store. I've cut it so there's a 1 inch border all around which catches the dust. There's a couple of advantages to this that I've found
1) cheap to make and 1 piece can make 2 supports, including one that will hold a full size sheet (19 x 26) of LaCarte, Colorfix etc.
2) can mount your painting and any reference pictures on it using plain old masking tape
3) catches all the dust so that you can take it outside to whack it on the back to knock off all the dust and loose pastel. (or you could collect it like Kat does but I know that it is highly unlikely that I would ever make my own pastel so I don't bother)
4) works great with or without an easel. On smaller paintings, I will sometimes work with it on my lap or desk
5) it's easy to clean because it's plastic. A couple of swipes with a baby wipe and all the dust is cleaned up that didn't come off when it was whacked on the back.

Here are a couple of pictures.




http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/22726-Picture3_002_small.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/22726-Picture3_004_small.jpg

PeggyB
08-22-2006, 12:35 AM
Interesting dust catcher Kathy. It is nice to have something so easy to clean and reuse. I have a question.

Am I seeing correctly that there is nothing along the bottom edge to keep dust from falling/blowing forward or away? I ask because one good sneeze (I'm allergic to most things "green" outside) or blast of wind and without the protection of a "cup" of some sort it looks as though it would blow all over. Maybe I'm just not seeing it correctly in the picture.

Peggy

KJSCL
08-23-2006, 12:06 AM
Heaven forbid - sneeze anywhere in the proximity of LaCarte - are you serious???? :evil: :lol:

I work with my easel either upright or tilted back a bit. I've tried with it tilted forward but it rhrew off my perspective for some reason. Anyway, the dust tends to drop and settle right in the crease of the bottom fold. I can pick up the painting and take it outside without any stray bits of dust falling off it until I turn it upside down.

Kitty Wallis
08-23-2006, 01:34 AM
I'm one of those who uses a rain gutter as a dust catcher on my studio easel. I love it since It's always ready to go for whatever size I'm working with.

For Plein Air I use a foam core drawing board. To make my dust catcher I use the bottom three inches of the board by cutting almost thru the back of the board and folding it up. I tape across the ends so the pastel dust stays in the catcher. I call it a trough. I'll be using one at the IAPS event in Albuquerque.

I reuse these boards, taping them along the sides with clear packing tape to prevent my masking tape from tearing it as I remove my paintings. When I'm at a trade show or convention, I get a new foam board in that town and cut and tape it as described since they cannot be carried on the plane in the size I like to use. 20x26

PeggyB
08-23-2006, 03:57 PM
Kathy thank you for the further information. Since I work with the slightly forward slant, it wouldn't be as useful for my purposes. However, I'm sure some others may like it.

Wow Kitty, your portable dust catcher/backing board looks like a good idea too - and light weight on top of that. Maybe I should rethink the raingutter method for in studio. It just seems so "strange" on first reading! :)

I learned to make backing boards from Alan Flattman using close-cell foam padding. I have different sizes of masonite boards (and two Ampersand boards that I "killed" by overwashing waaay back when - one 9x12 and one 16x20). I glue the foam to the backing. I like it quite a lot because it is firm enough, but also cushion enough. I can tape to it over and over again without tearing anything. If they get wet while doing a wash it doesn't buckle or warp. When they get too dirty, I just wash them with a wet cloth. They don't bend either. Of course I'd not try taking the large ones outside because they are heavier than foam core, but then I don't work large in field anyway. The blue backing you see in my photos above is the foam - old boy scout ground pads for under sleeping bags. I could spraypaint them white, but so far haven't bothered. I need to find another source though as I want one that is 24x30, and the pads are only about 22 inches wide.

Peggy

Peggy

khourianya
08-23-2006, 05:16 PM
aww - and to think I just sold two of those old camping mats for super cheap at my yard sale last weekend!!!

PeggyB
08-23-2006, 11:20 PM
aww - and to think I just sold two of those old camping mats for super cheap at my yard sale last weekend!!!

Oh NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! :lol: :lol: :lol: Sorry I didn't post this info sooner.
Honestly Cori, I think you'd like the surface if ever you find some camping mats again. It is the best use for the old ones. :) I especially like it with sanded surfaces. They seem to work just right together for me.

Peggy

Piper Ballou
08-24-2006, 12:16 AM
Great ideas here, I am pretty simple with my dust catcher, I take a poster board cut about 6 or so inches off, fold that section in half in a V shape and put the board I am using for support into the V.....fits on the easel quite well. I have made one for my plein air easel too that I carry outside....
Just another idea
piper

meowmeow
08-24-2006, 07:36 AM
I'm even more simple....but then I am very simple!...I learned this from the Terry Ludwig class I took. I have the really wide masking tape and take a strip and tape it across the bottom so there is a bit on the back but the wader part is out the front, across the bottom of the painting. It catches the pastel dust and the dust sticks to it! Yay! Then toss it and put on another piece for the next painting. It gets a little wrinkled sometimes but still catches the dust.

Sandy

Katherine T
08-24-2006, 08:11 AM
Wow - the innovation in this thread is "awesome" :D

Lots of really really good ideas - and certainly some I'd never even dreamed of never mind used!

PeggyB
08-24-2006, 12:25 PM
I'm even more simple....but then I am very simple!...I learned this from the Terry Ludwig class I took. Sandy

Well now of course Terry would have us throw away the dust - that way we need more of his pastels! :lol: :lol:

Just teasing Terry - actually this is another good idea. I'm enjoying seeing the various ways people use to deal with pastel dust - as Katherine said, "Wow - the innovation in this thread is "awesome".

Peggy

khourianya
08-24-2006, 01:50 PM
Oh NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Sorry I didn't post this info sooner.
Honestly Cori, I think you'd like the surface if ever you find some camping mats again. It is the best use for the old ones. I especially like it with sanded surfaces. They seem to work just right together for me.


well they certainly aren't fit to sleep on! :D so if I come across some more, I'll have to rig myself up a couple of boards for the studio! I like this idea better than using many sheets of newsprint (which I never do because it is so time consuming to set up when all I want to do is PAINT!)

dany
08-24-2006, 10:25 PM
Thanks for this thread, Peggy! When I start making some real dust, I'll have to rig myself up one of these dust catchers. I worked on my latest picture tonight (my mask stayed on the table this time--what a rebel!), with my board on my lap, as usual, and got only a few spots on my white t-shirt. I suppose I'd be surprized at how much dust I really make over the course of a painting. Thanks for the info! :)

artist_pw
08-25-2006, 11:54 AM
Hi:

For thicker metal type foil, check out some of the craft foils that come in rolls or heavy weight aluminum foil for cooking. Maybe that will help. When you pour the collected pastel dust into a container, do it over a piece of something like cooking parchment paper - that way, if any of it tries to escape, it will land on the paper, and then you can pick that up and pour it again. (I've seen baker's measure flour out onto parchment paper, and that looks like it would work well for pastel dust.)

I know artists who collect this dust, and when enough is accumulated, they'll rewet it with distilled water to form a paste, and roll it out like a pastel stick. If you haven't done this before, try it, because you can use a modification of this method to make your own colors from some of your existing pastels if you want to try experimenting. Anyway, hope this helps! :)

beebluefern
08-25-2006, 09:07 PM
These are great ideas...I've been wondering what to do with all the dust in my studio...:lol: Seems pretty smart to catch it at the bottom of the easel, so I'm going to give one of these a try for inside and another for plein air...I like Kitty's idea of foam core board! Rain gutter too!!! Wow

Tressa
08-27-2006, 09:16 AM
This is my dust catcher.. a piece of matboard cut at the sides to fold, and it lays on my easel and my backer board fits inside. dust catches, and I can dump in any time.

PeggyB
08-27-2006, 02:50 PM
This is my dust catcher.. a piece of matboard cut at the sides to fold, and it lays on my easel and my backer board fits inside. dust catches, and I can dump in any time.

Another good idea Tres. and now - How was the trip to Scotland?!

Peggy