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bjs0704
08-02-2006, 08:14 PM
Now, it's your turn to try the techniques that Bill describes in his workshop!

Post the paintings that you've done based on Bill's workshop.

Here's a link to the main workshop thread.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=362343

Barb Solomon:cat:

bjs0704
08-17-2006, 01:57 PM
I'm working on the charcoal drawing for this image from the Reference Image Library right now. I've toned a 16" x 20 canvasboard with a student grade Titanium white that I think has the same pigments as Permalba, plus raw sienna and burnt sienna.

Now, I'm working on drawing the petals of the flower!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Aug-2006/11410-sun_13small.jpg


Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
08-17-2006, 02:03 PM
Wow Barb, that is a gorgeous photo from the RIL. I'm looking forward to seeing your drawing and your painting as you work on it.

Ann

bjs0704
08-17-2006, 02:16 PM
Thanks, Ann! You can imagine that right now, it's taking a bit of patience to get the petals right!

What are you going to be painting?

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
08-17-2006, 06:50 PM
I think I am going to paint a photo by Ian Bruce from the RIL but am undecided. His photo has such beautiful light and darks yet I want to set up my own still life too just so I can see the actual shadows and light, using a box with a lamp. As you can tell, I am excited about doing this even though I don't paint very realistically. This should help though in that area :).

Sometimes I write too much for such a simple question :D,
Ann

idcrisis55
08-17-2006, 07:39 PM
Barb, here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/RefLib/showphoto.php?photo=53671&cat=500&ppuser=64870&sl=i) is the link to Ian Bruce's great photo, if you would like to see it :).

Ann

bjs0704
08-17-2006, 11:06 PM
Ann - Thatís a wonderful photo! It has a nice variety of textures and materials and you are right, the lighting is really wonderful in this photo!

How are you making your still life box and the set up?

Iím looking forward to seeing you post your version!

Barb:cat:

WFMartin
08-17-2006, 11:59 PM
Barb and Ann,

I would say you've both picked some beautiful and representative subjects to paint, using the methods that I described.

These both ought to be extraordinarily successful paintings, using the glazing process. I can't wait to see the results.

Bill

idcrisis55
08-18-2006, 12:31 AM
I like that photo so much that I have kept it "on hold" for months, looking at it, but not quite ready to try painting it. About the box, I read this great article (http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2514/127/) on how to fix a box for still life setups. So much useful info here at Wet C.

Bill, thank you. I have to admit I'm really nervous about starting this painting. I am telling myself it is just paint, canvas and a learning process. You know I will be re-reading your workshop notes frequently :D.

Ann

Granby
08-18-2006, 11:20 AM
UnderPainting: (almost finished - last time I'll be near a scanner), one last session to go on underpainting for minor fixes - should have it glazed and finished by monday. (Cross my fingers). Notes: it is not super polished; I think the subject matter makes it very important not to overwork it. Also, purposely leaving darkest shadows a bit light in value-due to prior tendency to go too dark too quick in my painting. Tried verdaccio with straight terra-verte - as practice for a revelation I had about why I was struggling with flesh colors.Wish me luck - I have a strong talent for ruining underpaintings.

stoney
08-18-2006, 11:26 AM
Barb, here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/RefLib/showphoto.php?photo=53671&cat=500&ppuser=64870&sl=i) is the link to Ian Bruce's great photo, if you would like to see it :).

Ann

Great photo. What other caught my eye is the replica ship from the stern. There's an idea I've had for some time which now can be developed when I have the time.

idcrisis55
08-18-2006, 12:25 PM
Granby, that was one of my concerns with the darker values. How dark to go in the underpainting? I have read that each additional glaze will make it even darker?

I think you are doing fantastic with your underpainting. Good luck with the glazing and I am looking forward to seeing your next update!

Stoney, Ian Bruce had some great photos of ships. I noticed those too. Do you think you will be painting the replica ship with the glazing method or a different one?

Ann

stoney
08-18-2006, 02:13 PM
Granby, that was one of my concerns with the darker values. How dark to go in the underpainting? I have read that each additional glaze will make it even darker?

I think you are doing fantastic with your underpainting. Good luck with the glazing and I am looking forward to seeing your next update!

Stoney, Ian Bruce had some great photos of ships. I noticed those too. Do you think you will be painting the replica ship with the glazing method or a different one?

Ann

I'm not sure. The painting would be different, on the humourous side. At this point in time I haven't developed the control or knowledge yet to do it justice.

WFMartin
08-18-2006, 02:30 PM
Granby, that was one of my concerns with the darker values. How dark to go in the underpainting? I have read that each additional glaze will make it even darker?

I think you are doing fantastic with your underpainting. Good luck with the glazing and I am looking forward to seeing your next update!

Stoney, Ian Bruce had some great photos of ships. I noticed those too. Do you think you will be painting the replica ship with the glazing method or a different one?

Ann

I quite often tweak the curves on my reference photo using Photoshop to purposely lighten and flatten (darker highlights/lighter shadows) the reference photo. That way, my glazes will darken the darks a bit further, and my scumbles (just another word for "glazes" in lighter areas) in the highlights will lighten the lighter areas a bit further than the grisaille, itself.

I purposely did not lighten and flatten the reference photo that I used as an example in the workshop, because the main theme of the workshop dealt with proper rendering of tones. But, for use as a grisaille underpainting, with color glazes to follow, the lightening and flattening of the reference photo works very well.

Even if one were to make their grisaille full range in values, one can always lighten shadows and darken highlights with glazes. The grisaille is just a guide, and does not need to be followed exactly for tone values. There's nothing wrong with using your glazes to lighten an area that is too dark on the grisaille, or to darken an area that happens to be a bit too light on the grisaille. I do that quite routinely.

The grisaille is but a guide, and the color glazes can be used to adjust tones/values as you apply them--and, at either end of the value scale.

Bill

idcrisis55
08-18-2006, 03:10 PM
Bill, thank you so much for this explanation. It is really helpful. I'm working on my grid so I can do the drawing. I did the grid in photoshop on the photograph and also did one on plexiglass. The plexiglass will be used to tape my paper on :).

Ann

bjs0704
08-18-2006, 07:59 PM
Well, Iím still working on flower petals! :lol:


Ann - Thanks for the link! It looks good!

Granby - Your underpainting of the stuffed animals is cute! The stuffed dog is great!:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Hi Stoney! Thanks for cheering us on! Are you going to join in? :)

Thanks for suggesting photoshop, Bill!:)

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
08-18-2006, 09:58 PM
This is my first grid and I have attached it to share what has been drawn. My apologies for the poor photo. I need to check the ellipse of the plate and finish drawing in the window moulding. Tomorrow I will check for distortions, then transfer this to canvas.

Do most of you use a grid or do you draw freehand? I'm just curious :D.

Ann

bjs0704
08-18-2006, 10:19 PM
Ann - It looks good!

Iím using a grid for this one, but Iíve used a slightly different method from Bill. I have always divided my surface into 4ís, across and from top to bottom.

Good luck with the elipses!

Barb Solomon:cat:

rmc
08-19-2006, 01:43 AM
Ann, I just popped by to visit Bill's class , your reference photo is awesome and your sketch is looking great - am still rather nervous about intruding in a new site- but if o.k. will post my iris here as I tried to follow Bill's fantastically clear and informative instructions, I guess I did the grisalle too dark and prob obvious mistake to have only one purple - I couldn't mix any variations that weren't muddy and ended up glazing over and over with different blues and reds etc which is why the darkness problems.
Oh well it is all a glorious road to learning - failure represents an attempt to learn something new:lol: :lol: Ruth
This is the grisaelle
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Aug-2006/83066-iris4.jpg
The final, IRL colour is less blue and more?magenta like the image. (I think, although needs a bit of attention to some details and defintion of petal edgges)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Aug-2006/83066-iris9.jpg
Original image from RIF with thanks to madster
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Aug-2006/83066-BlackIris1.jpg

WFMartin
08-19-2006, 02:27 AM
You all seem to be off to great starts. As a first attempt at glazing, let me say that the first glaze always has quite a bit of the grisaille showing through. That is OK. Just let it dry, and apply another glaze layer. Don't be in a hurry to cover everything beneath each glaze layer, because it is the blending and melding of one layer over the other that eventually provides the depth of tone and color of the final painting.

I would advise that on your first attempt at the glazing, you perhaps carry the glazing on for a layer or two after you believe yourself to have completed the painting. You will sometimes be surprised at the impact that an extra layer of glaze will do. Just search out the weakest area to be glazed, each time you begin a session, and give your most attention to adding a glaze to that area.

Bill

idcrisis55
08-19-2006, 05:23 AM
Good Morning Barb & Everyone :wave:

Thanks for sharing your grid method, Barb. I will give that one a try too :)

Hi Ruth, good to see you here. As you know, I have been watching you paint this iris and think you are doing a tremendous job with it. I definitely don't think your darks are too dark, going by the photo of your painting, do you?

I will remember what you said, Bill, about glazing again when one thinks they are finished. Now to put all you have shared with us to use:)

Ann

stoney
08-19-2006, 12:28 PM
Hi Stoney! Thanks for cheering us on! Are you going to join in? :)

Barb Solomon:cat:

I'm going to try, but it'll take me a day or so as I've got to paint over a small canvas and select a subject.

I'm also trying to get 'Purple Lightening' finished for the N. Calif. fair. If not then I've got a jump on next year! :) [roughed in the foreground and the paint's drying]

stoney
08-19-2006, 12:41 PM
This is my first grid and I have attached it to share what has been drawn. My apologies for the poor photo. I need to check the ellipse of the plate and finish drawing in the window moulding. Tomorrow I will check for distortions, then transfer this to canvas.

Do most of you use a grid or do you draw freehand? I'm just curious :D.

Ann

'Rapt Attention' [eagle head in oil] was drawn freehand on the canvas then checked and adjusted via ruler.

Last weekends WDE 'Falkirk Wheel' was drawn freehand.

A large drawing paper one [16 x 24?] which is unfinished was done via grid.

idcrisis55
08-19-2006, 01:19 PM
Thanks Stoney, for sharing how you draw :) Looking forward to seeing what you decide to paint.

Ann

bjs0704
08-19-2006, 01:19 PM
Hi RMC! Welcome to the classical forum! Itís nice to meet you!

Your irises are lovely! The grisaille is beautiful, it practically sparkles! It does convey the sense of billowy petals that shine in the sun! I like how the final one turned out.

Iíve read of artist who like to use various mixed purples. They also often vary the color depending on whether it is in the shade or sun. Bluer in the shade, more red in the sun. But, I like how your iris looks! (You can see some plum colors in the center section of the reference.) Thereís many ways to approach the same subject. It doesnít look too dark to me!

Great job! It is really lovely!

Barb Solomon:cat:

bjs0704
08-19-2006, 03:38 PM
Stoney - I hear you! Iím still drawing out petals too!

ďPurple lightningĒ is such a nice painting! Good luck getting it in the show!

Barb Solomon:cat:

stoney
08-19-2006, 05:41 PM
Thanks Stoney, for sharing how you draw :) Looking forward to seeing what you decide to paint.

Ann

Welcome. I don't recall if I mentioned last weeks WDE where I drew the Falkirk Wheel freehand. The weird angles I got all wrong, but with a time limit there was no time to work things out.

stoney
08-19-2006, 05:42 PM
Stoney - I hear you! Iím still drawing out petals too!

ďPurple lightningĒ is such a nice painting! Good luck getting it in the show!

Barb Solomon:cat:

Hehehehhe. Thank you. I suspect it will be in the show next year, not this.
Ah well, I get a jump ahead on things.

rmc
08-19-2006, 07:05 PM
Thanks for your welcome Barb, you're right about the colour variations in the petals - They aren't clear in my photo but are the issues I had with the hues in the painting. I am new to art and still find it a wonderment to find something on my canvas - I try to follow the shapes / colours etc but often only 'see' the picture etc after I have painted it- it's like a whole new seeing - the closest to those feelings of wow from childhood, (such as discovering trees have leaves, and a million other little details when I got my first pair of glasses)

I really posted here to say thankyou to Bill for all his time and fantastic commitment to teaching this method:clap: :clap:

Will be popping back to see your progress Ann and Stoney :wave: - just as a suggestion I have found doing the grisaelle in two sittings best - the first lighter sort of 'blocking in the values', then I take a photo and compare this on the screen to my grayscale reference image - helps to see the areas that I have got wrong, then I do a second layer this time going for greater detail and accuracy - in fact sometimes I have done the grisaelle in three stages :) with my first rough go in raw umber or similiar - just to help me to focus on the different values - It takes me a lot of looking to work out what is going on.
I find a strong accurate as pos. drawing with the correct curvatures etc also helps in developing the 3d illusion. I grid on a 1.5in of the ref image printed out in 10x8 in size to help with this.

Have a great day every one, Ruth

bjs0704
08-19-2006, 11:28 PM
Thereís always a bit of debate about how many of those colors to include. Sometimes, it can confuse things, but it can also be the detail that brings magic to a painting. Knowing when to copy and when to leave things alone takes time.

Thanks for the advice about doing the grissaille. It makes good sense!:thumbsup:

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
08-21-2006, 11:40 AM
:lol: :lol: Good Morning Everyone :wave:

Ruth, thank you for all the suggestions for working the grisaille. Your grisaille looked so professional and mine is looking like child's play. Hopefully though, that will change as I work more on it.

I decided to do the grisaille in acrylics. Because I take lots of breaks, it takes me awhile to paint anything:D. This is very rough as I am just blocking in values rather quickly. Once I have most of the values blocked in, I will readjust the values and shapes for more accuracy. Getting that perspective on the window is fun even though I sketched according to the grid. It still was(is) pretty confusing.

I have never painted oils over acrylics and thought to try that method with this painting. I think it will be easier to adjust the values and shapes with oils rather than with acrylic as the oils remain workable.

Don't you just love the ellipse of the plate, the wonky window, etc. :lol: :lol: :lol:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Aug-2006/15669-Pewter08-21-06__10.17am.jpg

Bill, I may not do your workshop justice, but I am certainly enjoying this.

Feel free everyone(anyone) to comment/critique as it is all about learning :)

Ann

rmc
08-21-2006, 09:52 PM
Ann, this is looking just fantastic - you have chosen a challenging image with so many different textures and subjects - little wonder you need breaks - You will really enjoy how once you are happy with the grisaelle, that the painting is in a win win situation and will paint itself-
I can tell you right now that if you are willing to part with it I will buy your painting, you have a sensitive eye for atmosphere and that is so well captured in this grisaelle. I'm looking forward to the next instalment, Ruth

idcrisis55
08-21-2006, 10:34 PM
Hi Ruth, I think I am blushing. Thank you for your kind comments as you really made my day.

Painting the values has been so enjoyable the pleasure must be coming through in the painting. I discovered that the objects are setting on a trunk which has a carved top. At first I thought it was just a different cloth on the viewer's right side. What a neat discovery.

I truly hope you are right, that once the grisaille is finished the color will fall into place. Why don't we wait until the painting is finished and then if you are still interested in it, you can PM me.

Thanks again for brightening my day,
Ann

bjs0704
08-22-2006, 10:11 AM
Here's the outline of my sunflowers. I still have a little bit of the grid showing on the bottom.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Aug-2006/11410-billsunflowerproject.jpg

Barb Solomon:cat:

bjs0704
08-22-2006, 11:17 AM
Ann - Your grisaille is looking really good!

So far, the values look right.

As a general rule, itís probably good to consider whether or not you need to adjust the values after you get the grisaille painted. Sometimes the blank white area makes dark areas seem too dark.

The sparkles on you glass look really great! Your doing a good job with all of the textures.

Ruth -:wave:

Barb Solomon:cat:

Granby
08-22-2006, 12:02 PM
Hello All - great work everyone:
Here is my finished version: I'm stopping before I tinker with it too much. In fairness, it was probably not the best idea to proceed with this painting for this particular workshop as I deviated from the workshop in several ways: I did the whole painting from a sketch instead of a photo, there is no background at all, and the underpainting was not a nuetral color. I'm very happy with how it turned out though, I think this is probably my best effort yet at acheiving a convincing three dimensional illusion.

bjs0704
08-22-2006, 12:09 PM
Granby -This little still life is looking great!:clap: :clap: :clap:

I can understand if you are going to want to leave the colors as they are. The warm, soft colors go with the subject matter so nicely!

I can imagine an implied wall behind the animals and can almost see the corner between the wall and what they are sitting on. You could probably keep going or stay with what youíve done!

Itís looking so good!:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


The concentration on tonal values that comes with making a grisaille really does make paintings look better!

Barb Solomon:cat:

Granby
08-22-2006, 12:35 PM
Thanks Barb,
For the sake of my art education I should probably continue working on it. But last night I hung it on the wall in a dark frame with a thick border, and it was really quite striking - I'm listening to my muse and leaving this one as is.

Good luck on your projects everyone.

idcrisis55
08-22-2006, 02:29 PM
Hi Barb, your outline of the sunflower is looking good. Have you begun the grisaille? I have a question for you, if you don't mind. Which is, did you do the grid and outline on a toned canvas? That is what it looks like and what a great idea. It saves having to transfer from drawing or tracing paper to the canvas.

Thanks too for the comments on the beginning of the grisaille. I'm still working on it but getting closer to the final values.

Granby, if my painting turns out half as good as yours, I will be tickled. I like what you have done and the warmth against the cool.

Ann

bjs0704
08-22-2006, 03:22 PM
Hi Ann - Iím just starting the grisaille! Lifeís been getting so busy and Iím trying hard to make sure that I paint everyday!

Yes, I toned the canvas with the burnt sienna, raw sienna and Titanium white that Bill suggested. Then, unlike Bill, I gridded on the surface with vine charcoal. I usually divide my picture into 4 parts to make my grid.

I like this method because Iím less likely to have the transfer paper slip and Iím often REALLY picky about the placement of objects within the canvas. But, Iíve used a method similar to the one that Bill has used many times and itís often a really good method for detailed work.

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
08-23-2006, 12:41 AM
Hi Barb & Everyone :wave:

I'm looking forward to seeing your grisaille. I know what you mean about life being busy as I have to be out of the studio every day until Monday. Like you, that means painting when I can.

Thanks for sharing your method. It is always good to know different ways of doing things to arrive at the same goal.

I still have adjustments to make but it is slowly coming together. Below is an update which isn't the best photo. I had to do color removal and hit the contrasts to get it halfway close to what it really looks like. I still have work to do on that window sill. As you can see where the moulding meets the sill, the angles are different and not even the same height lol. I still have work to do on the lid, the apple and a little on the plate. I'm getting excited to put color on to see how it looks :D.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Aug-2006/15669-Pewter08-22-06_11.20pm_001.jpg

I hope others are painting away as I would love to see what everyone is doing.

Ann

idcrisis55
08-23-2006, 03:07 PM
I think the acrylic grisaille is finished and am now ready to begin the color. Comments/suggestions are more than welcomed.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Aug-2006/15669-Pewter08-23-06_1.40pm_001_500.jpg
Thanks,
Ann

idcrisis55
08-26-2006, 09:27 AM
Here is where I am with the overpainting. How are you all doing with your paintings?

I'm finding it hard to get a decent photo with oils because of glare. The wall on the viewer's left looks more like the upper portion of the opposite wall.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Aug-2006/15669-Pewter082606_6.50am_002.jpg

Comments, etc. ??
Ann

WFMartin
08-26-2006, 09:44 AM
Ann,

Your painting is looking really good! How do you find it to be painting over a detailed grisaille underpainting? I often find artists who at first thought it a waste of time to paint such a complete grisaille, to be quite enthused with the ease of applying color, once the color layers are begun.

Here's what I do to eliminate glare when photographing my work. I don't use flash. In fact, I don't use any direct light--even sunlight. I take my painting out onto my patio, or the front vestibule of my house, depending upon what time of day it is. I lay my painting flat on the floor, being sure that there is no reflection of anything upon the surface of the painting.

I straddle the painting, and, aiming my camera straight down at my painting, I set my digital camera on as full a zoom as I can, filling my camera window frame. I take a deep breath, and let half of it out, and snap the picture.

Using indirect light will eliminate glare. Standing directly above your painting will keep it square. Setting your digital camera on a high a zoom as you can, eliminates the barrel-shape so often prevalent with digital cameras. And, letting half your breath out, and holding that position while snapping the photo, prevents movement.

Give it a try.

You have a wonderful painting here.

Bill

idcrisis55
08-26-2006, 10:04 AM
Thanks Bill, so much for all of your comments and help. I really do like painting the grisaille first, especially for still life or even florals, but will try it with landscapes too. This painting has been a joy to do all the way through. There is still more work to do on this one but I'm taking my time with it. I am using water miscible oils so scumble instead of using a medium for glazing. I'm not sure what medium I could use with wm oils so am trying to fake the glazing :D.

Ann

rmc
08-27-2006, 08:57 PM
Oh Ann, this is trully a classical painting - it is looking soo good. I am a complete sucker for blue glass and you have done superbly on the reflections, can't wait to see it finished -Ruth

idcrisis55
08-27-2006, 09:58 PM
Hi Ruth and thank you so much. I worked on it a bit more today and am liking it better. I have a dental appointment to have a wisdom tooth pulled so probably won't feel much like working on it tomorrow :(. But hope to take a photo of it, setting it on the floor the way Bill suggested. I tried tonight and still have that lovely glare lol.

Ann

idcrisis55
08-30-2006, 11:00 AM
Here is an update and I am attaching two photos so they can be seen side by side if you wish. The 1st one is taken outside at 9:10 a.m. and the 2nd photo is taken inside in natural light (lightened slightly with Fill Flash) at 9:30a.m. No contrasts were applied.

Bill, I took your advice and layed them flat to take the photo which worked like a charm. Thanks so much :D.

I have one little spot on the rim of the plate to correct, highlights to add, and some of the reddish/orange tone to the foreground front of the trunk to add a hint of color against the blues and other darks. I might lower the top knob of the pot so that the light rim plays against the green window sill rather than against the lights of the window.

C & C appreciated on anything you see or that you believe would make this painting better.

Thanks in advance,
Ann

bjs0704
08-31-2006, 09:16 PM
Bill - I always love reading your helpful answers! You are the best!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Aug-2006/11410-terrific.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Aug-2006/11410-terrific.gif


When I was in college, a prof asked me to take slides of my paintings by taking them outside and taking the picture. He then was upset about the keystoning that occurred on each slide. I never knew how someone avoided it. :eek: :confused:

Now, I know! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

With my luck, I would have probably gotten a great shot of my old gymshoes too!:lol: :lol:

Ann -Your painting has turned out superbly! The reflections on the glass and the silver and so beautiful!:thumbsup: :thumbsup:

I can see how the glazing method has probably helped in catching all the subtle colors, lights and shadows!:thumbsup:

Great job!:clap: :clap: :clap:

Barb Solomon:cat:

bjs0704
08-31-2006, 09:18 PM
Well, I'm slowly and surely working on the grisaille.

Here's the latest.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Aug-2006/11410-sunflower_two.jpg



Now, what did I say about keystoning!:D :D :D

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
09-01-2006, 05:57 AM
Hi Barb, I laughed about the gymshoes. I had to crop out my feet :D.

Your grisaille is coming along beautifully. It is already getting a glow to it! I'm staying tuned to see your next update.

Thanks for the comments on the still life too. I truly enjoyed doing this one.

Cheers,
Ann

Cafť LoLa
09-05-2006, 02:08 AM
I just started, and my project is the 3 apples on blue silk, from the Image Reference Library.

Attached are the Reference Image that I cropped down, and the desaturated image, and the WIP so far.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2006/87372-Apples_cropped.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2006/87372-Apples_desat.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2006/87372-apple_wip1.jpg

I've stepped back, and need adjust the values on the folds on the left side of the apples, and in the upper right corner as well. I've chose not to follow the fabric texture at this point. Maybe another project.

The WIP is on a 8"x10" wooden cradleboard, and painted with acrylics.

Comments welcome.

idcrisis55
09-05-2006, 07:59 AM
Hi Laurie, you have a good start and am looking forward to your updates. Those lights are already popping :).

Ann

bjs0704
09-07-2006, 05:38 PM
Hi Everyone,

Here's the sunflowers. I'm debating about whether I should do more on the centers or not. (I love details.)

Barb Solomon:cat:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2006/11410-sunflower3.jpg

bjs0704
09-07-2006, 06:06 PM
Thanks, Ann! I really appreciate the encouragement. :thumbsup:

Laurie - You are doing a beautiful job on the drapery! Those folds in the fabric are luscious! Keep up the good work! Iím really looking forward to seeing what is next!:clap: :clap: :clap:


Ok, Iím still working on this. I am a slow but steady sort of painter! :lol:


So if anyone else is out there, let me know! :)

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
09-07-2006, 09:19 PM
Your grisaille looks really good to me Barb. Have you begun the overpainting? I'm looking forward to seeing this one come into its own :)

Ann

bjs0704
09-07-2006, 11:59 PM
Thanks, Ann! Nope, I have started the color. Some of my WC friends have just about convinced me to try painting the center.:eek: :D

I may try it! If it doesn't work I'll repaint that area and do a simple version. I do look detailed paintings so it would be nice to try.

Then, I start the colors!:evil:

Barb Solomon:cat:

idcrisis55
09-08-2006, 12:16 PM
I agree with your WC friends, a little texture in the center would add to painting. Looking forward to your updates :)

Ann

bjs0704
09-08-2006, 12:35 PM
Thanks, Ann! I appreciate having an additional opinion! :thumbsup:

Barb:cat: