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moonduck
07-27-2006, 06:33 PM
Does anyone do impasto painting in this forum? I was bored with a painting I was working on, so I just started blobbing on color with an impasto knife. It is fun, but I've never trid it before, so I'm guessing that there is probably a more correct was to do it then just blobbing it on. Can anyone give me a few tips? It certainly has livened things up!

ryster007
07-27-2006, 06:42 PM
Yeah I've tried it- its really liberating! here was my effort

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jul-2006/83841-Boat_at_cockenzie.jpg

I applied paint with pallette knife only and really went for it!!

I was inspired by a Scottish painter called John Lowrie Morrison (or JOLOMO as he signs his pics- i recomend you google him very inspiring) after seeing an exhibition. I guess this is an abstract expressionist type thing (at least that is how he described it!)

Just get stuck in and post us your attempts!!

Ryan

moonduck
07-27-2006, 06:51 PM
that's a fantastic painting. so alive! i love it. i'm already inspired. do you use different size and shape knives? i only have two at the moment...one rounded plastic and one pointed metal.

moonduck
07-27-2006, 06:54 PM
i just checked out John Lowrie Morrison. he's great.

ryster007
07-27-2006, 07:10 PM
that's a fantastic painting. so alive! i love it. i'm already inspired. do you use different size and shape knives? i only have two at the moment...one rounded plastic and one pointed metal.

Yeah i bought a really cheap pack of them! Although I have two that I regularly use. One is the shape of a wedge of cake (does that make sense?!) and size 3 the other is the one I used most which has a flat end to it at a 45 degree angle about an inch wide. this is really useful for applying the big wegdes of colour. the small one I used for detail. I wish I had a picture to illustrate!
Anyway make sure the ones you use to paint with have an angled head like a trowel- I think these are more properly known as painting knifes. Ones where the blade come straight out of the handle are pallette knifes- if you use these you cannot get the blade flat with the canvas as they're designed more for mixing colour than applying

Hope this helps- please post your attempts they may inspire more people!

Ryan

moonduck
07-27-2006, 07:27 PM
when i get something i kind of like i'll post. better get back to it RIGHT NOW.

loop
07-28-2006, 02:56 PM
This started out as a pretty classical pose, unfortunately the model couldn't hold it, so after about 15 Minutes we switched it up, and I scraped it off. The next pose lasted a solid 25 minutes and that was it for a model, painting a person from life was over so I scraped it off again.
Of course I needed to paint, so, using the still full piles of fresh paint and a painting knife I used the ghost of an image that was left behind when I scraped off the last pose, as a guide, to do this.
I used only 1 knife, the triangular one
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Jul-2006/6307-knifed.jpg
closeup
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Jul-2006/6307-knifedzoom.jpg

InkyTinker
07-28-2006, 11:28 PM
Moonduck, I say "go for it" - it really frees up your art and can be very expressive.

Ryan, your painting is great - it really works. (could painting in JoLoMo style be a "FauxJoLoMo" LOL!).

Loop - that portrait is fantastic, I love it!

Another impasto painter I really admire is Frank Auerbach, he paints so thickly, it is almost sculpture - google him too!

ryster007
07-31-2006, 07:07 AM
Hi Loop

I really love that portrait, its got a real haunting edge to it with the cool blues. The textural effect also work very well in the modelling of the face. This has a real Expressionist fell about it

Kari thanks for the kind words! I'll try and check out Frank Auerbach also.

Ryan

A Few Pigments
07-31-2006, 06:03 PM
You could study the work of Vincent Van Gogh http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/van_gogh_vincent.html he excelled at the impasto method.

Also, the WC member LarrySeiler http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/member.php?find=lastposter&t=351051 could tell you a lot about painting with the impasto method. Larry is a professional artist with more than 20 years experience.

ryster007
08-01-2006, 04:57 PM
You could study the work of Vincent Van Gogh http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/van_gogh_vincent.html he excelled at the impasto method.

Also, the WC member LarrySeiler http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/member.php?find=lastposter&t=351051 could tell you a lot about painting with the impasto method. Larry is a professional artist with more than 20 years experience.

Hi A Few Pigments :thumbsup:

Great to see you back:clap: ! I'm already in love with Mr Van Gogh's work- there's a great exhibition here at the moment in Scotland

http://www.natgalscot.ac.uk/index.asp?centre=html/2-galleries/2-indGalleryFS.asp?gallery=3-bCurr

the textures and colour choices are just awesome!

Ryan

A Few Pigments
08-01-2006, 05:34 PM
Ta very much for the link Ryan.

Rosic
08-01-2006, 06:38 PM
Here's a demo on one I did...
An Impressionistic "En Plein Aire" Demonstration... (http://artisticrelease.blog.com/search/?q=Art+Imitates+Life...+and+Vice+Versa...+)

ryster007
08-02-2006, 07:13 AM
Hi Bernie

Loved that demo, I must try that 'ugly' stage using the complementary colour- turned out really atmospheric

Cheers for sharing!

Ryan

Rosic
08-02-2006, 11:05 AM
Hi Bernie

Loved that demo, I must try that 'ugly' stage using the complementary colour- turned out really atmospheric

Cheers for sharing!

Ryan
Ryan... please do give it a try... I'd love to see your results and hear your thoughts. On this one I simply used thick paint but I really like the results of impasto work using Liquin Impasto in a tube (http://www.dickblick.com/zz004/45/) (Used in this painting... They Came In Peace (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=301893))... it allows for great texture and drys pretty quick too.

moonduck
08-15-2006, 05:37 PM
Well here is my first attempt at a knife painting. I only had one knife, so that's what I used. Did I just make a big mess? Are there some simple things I could do to improve the painting? It was fun using the knife. I'd like to try more.

ryster007
08-15-2006, 06:13 PM
Moonduck

That is superb- really good work! You definitely didn't just make a mess and I hope you try more. There's some really nice colour harmony going on as well as the great texture- love it!
As to improving it there's little if anything wrong. Possible could have introduced some subtle blues as these are the complement to orange might have worked. But this is being hyper critical as I would not touch it if it were mine!

Ryan

Carey Griffel
08-15-2006, 06:36 PM
Wow, that's great. I especially like the foreground and the sense of depth you have. I'm very impressed.

I'm curious, what size is this?

~!Carey

moonduck
08-15-2006, 07:02 PM
Thanks Carey and Ryan for the positive notes. I like the idea of blue. I have some soft blues on the background rocks, but it's pretty subtle compared to the yellow/oranges. It might be fun t make a few blues jump out in the foreground. I'm not sure I'm in love with that big branch coming into frame on the left and the redwood tree on the left might be too fat. Not sure. Carey, the canvas is a 20" x 20".

357mag
08-16-2006, 12:32 AM
That sailboat on the blue sea is outstanding. I really like it. I'm going to try some impastos sometime.

ryster007
08-16-2006, 07:42 AM
That sailboat on the blue sea is outstanding. I really like it. I'm going to try some impastos sometime.

Many thanks:thumbsup:

I really enjoyed doing this, felt really liberating and had no idea how it would turn out. You should definitely give it a bash- try to be bold and don't overwork it

Ryan

Eduardo Flores
08-16-2006, 09:12 AM
...I must try that 'ugly' stage using the complementary colour...
Dear Ryster and Rosic,
I saw in this demo two fundamental points: the first is the advantage of an underpainting with complementary colors, giving vibration and freshness to the final color (when this is well applied, without covering the underpainting completely).
The second is more general, referring to the existence, in any painting process, of a more or less pronounced "phase of ugliness" that, at the eyes of an inexperienced student, may result in a "dark night of the artist", whose result may be to abandon the project. Even warning my students about, many have great difficulty in accepting ugliness as part of the construction of beauty.
For this reason, every example is welcome, and with a thorough explanation; also, showing the final result, that in the case of Rosic's demo is vibrant, chromatically musical.

Eduardo

Eduardo Flores
08-16-2006, 09:28 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jul-2006/83841-Boat_at_cockenzie.jpg

I applied paint with pallette knife only and really went for it!!
Ryan
Few words are needed: everything, but mainly the sea, is GREAT!

Eduardo

Rosic
08-16-2006, 11:11 AM
Dear Ryster and Rosic,
I saw in this demo two fundamental points: the first is the advantage of an underpainting with complementary colors, giving vibration and freshness to the final color (when this is well applied, without covering the underpainting completely).
The second is more general, referring to the existence, in any painting process, of a more or less pronounced "phase of ugliness" that, at the eyes of an inexperienced student, may result in a "dark night of the artist", whose result may be to abandon the project. Even warning my students about, many have great difficulty in accepting ugliness as part of the construction of beauty.
For this reason, every example is welcome, and with a thorough explanation; also, showing the final result, that in the case of Rosic's demo is vibrant, chromatically musical.

Eduardo

A sincere thank you Eduardo... :wink2:

Nice knife work moonduck... :clap:

ryster007
08-16-2006, 11:28 AM
Few words are needed: everything, but mainly the sea, is GREAT!

Eduardo

Thanks Eduardo:)

I'm definitely going to atempt more of these and try Rosics tip with complementary underpainting- the end results is so vibrant!:thumbsup:

Ryan

Rosic
08-16-2006, 11:36 AM
I'm definitely going to atempt more of these and try Rosics tip with complementary underpainting- the end results is so vibrant!

Ryan... in fact I need to try it again... Eduardo was right... the colors did vibrate with excitement. I'll share mine if you share yours... we'll get past the UGLY stage together. :D

ryster007
08-16-2006, 01:00 PM
Ryan... in fact I need to try it again... Eduardo was right... the colors did vibrate with excitement. I'll share mine if you share yours... we'll get past the UGLY stage together. :D

Absolutely- I'm off to get my colour wheel!:evil:

Ryan