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chayanvinayak
07-15-2006, 02:28 PM
Please tell me the procedure of preparing CANVAS for painting

holidayhanson
07-17-2006, 01:03 AM
I will tell you what not to do.....I use acrylic and usually paint in the back ground sky and then sketched in my foreground with a pencil...which wouldnt show up...so i used a ballpoint pen...MISTAKE!!! Ballpoint pen will bleed through paints...many layers of paint at that. I later read about people sketching their shapes in with paint and then putting a clear coat over it so it will not bleed through.

But what I do know is a few hearty coats of gesso, some say the more coats the better, sanded lightly between coats, ...this will seal the absorbent quality of naked canvas...or else canvas will soak up your spendy pigments. after gesso and sanding spraying the back side of the canvas (if it is on strechers) will tighten up the canvas like a drum.

i am sure you will get more input... by more experienced folk...im new to this myself.

bertie291
07-17-2006, 09:01 PM
spraying the back side of the canvas (if it is on strechers) will tighten up the canvas like a drum.

What are you spraying the backside of the canvas with?
I have always gessoed and sanded my canvas, then after work is completely dried I either spray or brush varnish over oils, or nothing over acryllic......

holidayhanson
07-19-2006, 12:38 AM
What are you spraying the backside of the canvas with?
I have always gessoed and sanded my canvas, then after work is completely dried I either spray or brush varnish over oils, or nothing over acryllic......

Ooops...spray the back side of the canvas with water...after it dries it tightens up. As for varnishing or clear coat....I am refering to covering underpainting or pencil marks sketched on white gesso...this should prevent the pencil, paint, or pen from bleeding through paint. I do though use a high gloss varnish over my acrylic paintings when they are finnished to unify the luster of the painting...as some parts may or may not have been used with mediums. I also like the wet paint look and really brings out the color in acrylic paint too.

jarrystapleton
07-20-2006, 03:52 PM
hey guys, sand,dust, almost anything will gling to plastic..and you can t just 'dust' it off.. it is there ..lasting.. building up.. so please cover your dried plastic[acrylic paint] with 'forgiving, easy to remove and redo[will not have damaging effect] damar varnish....and you and you buying public will always for years and years say 'thank you'

mnpainter
07-20-2006, 07:27 PM
Slapp some gesso on and go at it!!!!!!!!! Oil prime, acrylic cheap gesso, household paint just to seal the support look to various thread here on WC they will tell you better

Ben

no1liksu
07-22-2006, 10:49 PM
After gesso I do the drawing, I seal the drawing with a light coat of acrylic matt medium. It's there for good after that.

midcoast
07-24-2006, 10:07 AM
First, stretch your raw linen or cotton canvas tightly on decent stretcher bars that are SQUARED up.

Acrylic prime: Once the canvas is stretched, just slap on some acrylig gesso (a couple of coats, letting dry between coats) and you're ready to paint. Sanding is optional.

Oil or Alkyd Prime: Stretch your linen or canvas. Mix up a batch of RabbitSkin glue. Apply to the stretched linen/canvas while the glue is warm. Let dry. The bunny glue protects the fibers in the cloth from the oils in the oil or alkyd primer (some people use PVA glue rather than RSG). Some people sand the surface at this point...I don't find it necessary. Apply a second coat of RSG if the first one was pretty thoroughly absorbed. Once that is dry, apply your oil or alkyd priming either as a thinned wash or straight from the can with a palette knife.

I'll make one note here...Ben (above) mentions using oil primer. As I said, if you use an oil or alkyd primer, you must seal the canvas or linen first with RSG or PVA, otherwise the oils in the primer will deteriorate the fibers in the cloth.

My preference now is to paint on portrait-grade linen with RSG and an alkyd primer. Beautiful surface!

Nancy